Mark Hellinger Theatre

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Mark Hellinger Theatre
Warner Bros. Hollywood Theatre (1930–1948)
51st St. Theatre (1936–1937, 1940–1941)
Mark Hellinger Theatre (after 1948)
Times Square Church (1989–present)
Times-square-church.jpg
Times Square Church, June 2007
Address237 West 51st Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′45″N 73°59′03″W / 40.76250°N 73.98417°W / 40.76250; -73.98417Coordinates: 40°45′45″N 73°59′03″W / 40.76250°N 73.98417°W / 40.76250; -73.98417
TypeFormer Broadway & cinema
Capacity1,603
Current useTimes Square Church
Construction
OpenedApril 22, 1930
Closed1989
Years active1930–1989
ArchitectThomas W. Lamb
DesignatedJanuary 5, 1988[1]
Reference no.1338[1]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedNovember 17, 1987[2]
Reference no.1339[2]
Designated entityLobby, basement lounge, and auditorium interior

The Mark Hellinger Theatre (formerly the 51st Street Theatre and the Hollywood Theatre) is a building at 237 West 51st Street in the Midtown Manhattan neighborhood of New York City, which formerly served as a cinema and a Broadway theatre. Opened in 1930, the Hellinger Theatre is named after journalist Mark Hellinger and was developed by the Warner Bros. as a movie palace. It was designed by Thomas W. Lamb with a modern facade and a Baroque interior. It has 1,605 seats across two levels and has been a house of worship for the Times Square Church since 1989. Both the exterior and interior of the theater are New York City landmarks.

The facade on 51st Street is designed in a modern 1930s style and is constructed with golden and brown bricks. The stage house to the west and the auditorium at the center are designed as one unit, with a cornice above the auditorium. The eastern section, containing the building's current main entrance, includes statues flanking the doors, as well as an overhanging marquee. The 51st Street facade was originally a side entrance; the main entrance was originally at 1655 Broadway but was closed in the 1950s. In contrast to the exterior, the theater has a Baroque interior. Its rotunda lobby contains eight fluted columns, a balcony, and a domed ceiling with several murals; a basement lounge exists under the lobby. The auditorium has a coved ceiling with murals, as well as boxes and a deep stage.

For the first two decades of the Hellinger Theatre's existence, it largely served as a cinema under the Hollywood Theatre name. Vaudeville was presented in 1932, and some legitimate productions were shown intermittently from 1934 to 1942. The theater was briefly known as the 51st Street Theatre in 1936 and 1941 and as the Warner Theatre from 1947 to 1948. Anthony Brady Farrell bought the theater and renamed it after Hellinger, reopening it as a legitimate theater in 1949. The theater was subsequently acquired by the Stahl family in 1957 and the Nederlander Organization in 1976. The Hellinger hosted some hits from the 1950s to the 1970s, including My Fair Lady and Timbuktu!, but its later productions were mostly flops. By 1989, a lack of Broadway productions prompted the Nederlanders to lease the theater to the Times Square Church, which bought the building two years later.

Site[edit]

The Mark Hellinger Theatre is on 237 West 51st Street, on the north sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Broadway, in the Midtown Manhattan neighborhood of New York City.[3][4] The irregular land lot covers 23,650 square feet (2,197 m2), with a frontage of 225 feet (69 m) on 45th Street and a depth of 200 feet (61 m). The bulk of the theater exists on 51st Street, with a wing extending north to 52nd Street.[4] The Mark Hellinger shares the block with the Neil Simon Theatre to the west. Other nearby buildings include the August Wilson Theatre to the north; the Broadway Theatre and 810 Seventh Avenue to the northeast; the Winter Garden Theatre to the southeast; and Paramount Plaza (including Circle in the Square Theatre and the Gershwin Theatre) to the south.[4] An entrance to the New York City Subway's 50th Street station, serving the 1 train, is just south of the theater.[5]

Design[edit]

The Mark Hellinger Theatre, originally the Hollywood Theatre, was designed by Thomas W. Lamb and was constructed in 1930 as a movie palace for the Warner Bros.. While the interior was designed in a Baroque style, the exterior was treated in a modern style.[3][6]

Facade[edit]

Former Broadway[edit]

The Hollywood Theatre's main entrance was originally at 1655 Broadway, with a narrow lobby leading to a grand foyer on 51st Street.[a] At the time of the theater's construction in 1930, cinemas that premiered films in the Times Square area typically had entrances on Broadway, regardless of the width. While the Broadway entrance was narrow, it contained a bright marquee and a huge lighted vertical sign. The Broadway entrance was closed in 1934 and converted to retail space.[7]

The roof of the Hollywood Theatre's Broadway wing originally contained a "V"-shaped steel sign measuring 80 feet (24 m) tall and 210 feet (64 m) wide. Described in 1929 as "the largest electrical display in the world", the sign weighed 115 tons. A dedicated generator illuminated the sign's 20,000 bulbs, which were arranged so that 8-foot-tall (2.4 m) letters could be flashed.[8]

51st Street[edit]

The only surviving facade is on 51st Street and consists of two modern-style sections, both made of brick and designed with vertical motifs.[7][9] The eastern section is a narrow entrance tower containing the building's entrance. The other section, which contains the stage house and auditorium, is shorter but wider.[9] Although the 51st Street facade serves as the building's current front entrance, this was originally a side entrance.[7]

Entrance detail

The entrance section has a water table made of black granite. The entrance itself contains five double doors below transom windows, all made of glass with bronze frames. On either side are tall figures holding globe-shaped lanterns, as well as bronze display boxes. A modern marquee is mounted over the building's entrance. The facade is made of gold brick, with three strips of brown-brick rectangles above the marquee, rising to a set of three brown-brick squares. On either side are fluted terracotta panels, topped by stylized urns that contain plant forms. On all stories, the theater's brick courses step outward to the left and right of the tower. The top of the entrance's facade contains a parapet with zigzag patterns.[9]

The stage house to the west and the auditorium at the center share a facade, with gold brick above a black-granite water table. Horizontal brown-brick strips run across the first story. The first floor also contains display boxes with brick headers around them, as well as an office door, a former stage door, and a wide garage door. On the upper stories, the central section (auditorium) contains a large brick panel surrounded by soldier courses. There are rectangular openings to the east (right) of this panel, with grilles above them. The top story of the auditorium contains stylized brick brackets, which support a decorative copper cornice; there are octagonal panels between the brackets. The stage house contains window openings between shallow brick piers. The stage house has a setback on the upper stories, with plain brick behind it.[9]

Interior[edit]

The Hellinger's rococo interior was similar to that of other 1920s movie palaces. The interior spaces were designed by Leif Neandross, chief designer of the Rambusch Decorating Company.[7][10] The original decorative scheme was gold with red and blue.[11]

Lobby[edit]

Rotunda ceiling
Rotunda column decorations

The original lobby from Broadway (since demolished) was designed in a modern French style.[7][11] It was Art Deco in design[12] and led to the present main lobby.[13][11] According to a contemporary account, the Broadway lobby had mirrored walls with bronze and marble decorations, in addition to a plaster ceiling.[11] The Broadway lobby was designed to potentially support a taller building that was canceled during the Great Depression.[10]

The main lobby is a double-height oval rotunda with eight fluted columns holding up a domed ceiling.[13][14][15] According to the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC), the lobby's design is similar to the interior of the 18th-century Basilica of the Fourteen Holy Helpers in Germany.[12] The Times Square Church uses the lobby to sell religious products such as books and CDs.[16] The main lobby's columns are placed on marble pedestals, and they are topped by Ionic-style capitals. Above the columns is a marble entablature with cherubs.[14] The ceiling has paneled arches and coves, which converge at a rope molding that surrounds the oval dome at the ceiling's center.[17] A classical mural is painted in the middle of the ceiling;[13][15][18] the mural was intended to symbolize arts and learning.[11] A large multi-tiered candelabra hangs from the middle of the dome.[15][18]

The lobby's walls contain marble bases, above which are panels surrounded by ornamental moldings. Lighting sconces are mounted onto the walls, and there are openings to the auditorium's orchestra level on the west wall.[17] Doors on the south wall lead back to the ticket lobby.[18] The north wall contains a grand staircase to a balcony at the auditorium's mezzanine level. Additional staircases connect to that level from the lobby's entrance.[14]

The balcony overlooks the lobby.[11][18] The staircases from the lobby contain wall panels with ornamental moldings as well as lighting sconces; there are also mirrors at the landings. Underneath the balcony, next to the columns on the north wall, are segmental arches that are supported by console brackets. The balcony itself has a balustrade with motifs of scallops and cherubs, while the underside of the balcony has moldings. The walls of the balcony also have panels with moldings; there are doorways decorated with cartouches and swags, which lead to lounges. Ribs divide the balcony's ceiling into panels, and there are moldings along the border of both the ribs and the panels. Candelabras and globe chandeliers are suspended from the balcony ceiling.[18] There was originally furniture along the balcony.[11]

Auditorium[edit]

View of the proscenium from the balcony

The auditorium has an orchestra level, one balcony, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The auditorium is slightly wider than its depth, and the space is designed with plaster decorations in low relief.[19] The auditorium's seating capacity is 1,603,[20][21] though historically it could fit 1,506 people.[7] The orchestra alone could fit 900 people.[20] The seats are upholstered in red velvet and finished in wood.[22] From the outset, three hundred seats were equipped with "Warner Theatre-phones" to both amplify and clarify sound for hard-of-hearing users. Damask curtains were placed on the walls to increase insulation.[23][24] The auditorium curves inward near the proscenium.[25]

Seating areas[edit]

The rear (east) end of the orchestra contains a shallow, curving promenade.[19] The walls of the orchestra promenade have doors, above which are exit signs with flanking volutes. Both the orchestra and the promenade contain flat pilasters on the walls, between which are panels with moldings on their borders.[26] The orchestra is slightly raked, sloping down toward an orchestra pit near the stage.[25]

The underside of the balcony, above the orchestra, contains globe-shaped light fixtures and three coves with scallops and foliation.[27] Though the balcony is also raked, its underside is convex, preventing sound-deadening air pockets from accumulating at the orchestra's rear wall.[23] The balcony also has a promenade at its rear, separated from the main balcony by decorated vertical piers.[26] The balcony and promenade walls contain flat pilasters and panels with molded borders. The side walls contain arched doorways with molded frames.[19] The rear wall has a standing rail and lighting sconces.[28] The balcony level is divided into front and rear sections by a crossover aisle,[25] which runs between metal railings on either side.[28] The balcony's front railing has foliate motifs, which are aligned on a vertical axis.[19] A projection room was placed at the rear of the balcony, measuring 30 feet (9.1 m) long and 12 feet (3.7 m) tall.[23]

View from the right of the auditorium, looking toward the boxes and left wall

On either side of the proscenium is an archway with a single box that is curved outward. The balcony's front railing extends onto the box's front railing, supporting two fluted Corinthian columns on either side of each box. Underneath the front railing of each box is an arch at orchestra level, which contains a pair of console brackets with a cartouche at the center. There are also cartouches beside the arches, under each pair of columns; these in turn are flanked by brackets with cherubs and swags. Above each box is another arch, which rises from volutes atop the Corinthian-column pairs.[26] Small pendant chandeliers are placed in front of the boxes' column pairs.[28]

Other design features[edit]

Next to the boxes is an inverted proscenium arch. The proscenium arch contains Corinthian-style fluted piers and columns on either side, topped by console brackets. The top of the arch is designed as an ornate entablature.[19] The center of the proscenium contains a large plaster-of-Paris crown,[7][13] supported by a broken pediment with winged figures.[26] The stage has a depth of 45 feet (14 m).[29] Although the Hellinger was built as a cinema, the theater's large stage could also be used to present large musical shows.[11][23]

Proscenium cove

Below the ceiling, wrapping around the whole auditorium, is an entablature with a leaf molding.[26] The edges of the ceiling are split into numerous coves, separated by console brackets with cartouches at their centers. Each of the coves contains a painted mural with a round frame and a cartouche above.[26] There are twelve frames in total, which depict 18th-century French aristocratic scenes;[13][28] each mural signifies a different part of the year.[11] The main portion of the ceiling contains additional molded bands, which contain more murals and surround an oval panel at the center.[27] The oval panel contains a fan design while the surrounding panels are designed in the Adam style. There are small pendant-style chandeliers hanging from the outer panels of the ceiling.[28] A large globe-style chandelier hangs from the center of the oval panel.[22][28]

Basement[edit]

Directly below the lobby is an oval basement lounge.[18] There are eight pairs of imitation-marble columns, topped by Tuscan-style capitals.[30] The walls contain panels with molded borders, and there are molded doorway openings with entablatures.[25] One wall contains a fireplace, the mantelpiece of which consists of a shelf supported on console brackets. The immediate opposite wall has doorways to the women's and men's restrooms.[30] The lounge formerly also had a bar, which was installed in the 1960s.[31]

The ceiling dome is shallow and contains a central medallion with overlapping circles, from which hangs a large chandelier. The rest of the ceiling contains moldings and beams, which divide the ceiling into sections, each with a central medallion and a smaller globe-style chandelier.[25] A staircase curves upward to the lobby and contains paneled walls with molded borders, as well as a paneled ceiling with suspended globe-style chandeliers.[30]

History[edit]

Movie palaces became popular in the 1920s, between the end of World War I and the beginning of the Great Depression.[32][33] In the New York City area, only a small number of operators were involved in the construction of movie palaces. Only a few architects were generally responsible for the designs of these movie palaces, including legitimate theater architects Thomas Lamb, C. Howard Crane, and John Eberson.[34]

Hollywood Theatre[edit]

Development and opening[edit]

Marquee

In April 1929, the Warner Bros. leased the lots at 217 to 233 West 51st Street and 234 West 52nd Street at an annual rate of $40,000. The lease was to run for 17 years, with options for two 21-year extensions. The Warner Bros. immediately started planning a movie palace on the site.[35][36] The company planned to build an entrance from Broadway, on the eastern end of the block.[36][37] The theater was to have 1,600 seats on an orchestra and a balcony level, and it would be the first Broadway theater built specifically for films.[37][38] The Warner Bros. had chosen this site specifically because it was close to the established Theater District around Times Square. That area, by the 1920s, was starting to see the development of movie theaters alongside legitimate venues.[39]

The Warner Bros. Hollywood Theatre opened on April 22, 1930, with the Warner Technicolor musical film Hold Everything, starring Winnie Lightner and Joe E. Brown.[40][41] The storefronts on Broadway were leased out for uses such as a Lindy's restaurant.[42] For its first two years, the Hollywood only screened films.[43] These included Moby Dick[44] and The Beggar of Bagdad in 1930,[45] as well as Bought[46] and The Mad Genius in 1931.[47] Lou Holtz announced his intention in early 1932 to lease the theater for vaudeville.[48][49] Holtz's vaudeville revues opened that February,[50] but they stopped two months later because Holtz said his simultaneous acting and producing of these revues were "strenuous".[51] Vaudeville returned in November 1932 when Arthur George Klein took over the theater for twice-a-day revue.[52][53] By February 1933, the Hollywood was again dark,[54] and the theater returned to hosting films afterward.[55] During 1933, the Warner Bros. acquired additional land at 235 to 239 West 51st Street from the Shubert brothers.[56][57] Generally, the Hollywood's films were not successful, and the venue stood empty for long periods.[58]

Alternating live shows and film[edit]

Top of the entrance

The Warner Bros. announced in October 1934 that they would renovate the stage for theatrical use and add 32 dressing rooms.[59] These changes were to accommodate Hollywood's first theatrical production:[60] Calling All Stars, a musical revue with Martha Raye, which opened in December 1934[61][62] and ran 35 performances.[61][63] In October 1935, the Hollywood hosted the premiere of the Warner Bros. film A Midsummer Night's Dream, starring James Cagney and Olivia de Havilland.[64][65] The following March, Earl Carroll negotiated with the Warner Bros. to rename the Hollywood Theatre for himself[66] and stage musicals there.[66][67] The theater was leased to George Abbott and renamed the 51st Street Theatre in late 1936.[68][69] The theater's main entrance was relocated from Broadway to 51st Street,[70][71] as the Warner Bros. wished to use the Broadway entrance for films and the 51st Street entrance for legitimate productions.[70] Abbott's play Sweet River opened that October[72][73] and closed after just five performances.[63][73]

The 51st Street Theatre reverted to film in 1937;[60][74] the Warner Bros. planned to either host their own films or rent the theater out for screenings.[74] The Hollywood Theatre name was restored in August 1937[55] with the screening of The Life of Emile Zola,[75][76] the first premiere at the theater since A Midsummer Night's Dream.[76] Further films followed until October 1938, when another live production opened, the Gilbert and Sullivan-themed musical Knights of Song.[71][77] This was followed by the 1939 edition of George White's Scandals, a transfer from the Alvin Theatre,[60][78] which ran for a month at the Hollywood.[79] In 1940, the theater was again renamed the 51st Street Theatre,[80] presenting a revival of Romeo and Juliet with Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier that May.[81][82] Though the play had been highly promoted,[83] it ran for only 36 performances.[84][85] This was followed in October 1940 by a three-week performance by the Ballet Russe de Monte-Carlo,[86][87] then in November by performances from Colonel Wassily de Basil's Original Ballet Russe.[88][89]

The theater reverted to the Hollywood Theatre name and again began showing films.[83] A renovation of the Hollywood Theatre was announced in mid-1941, when Eddie Cantor's musical Banjo Eyes was booked.[90] Banjo Eyes opened in December 1941 and ran for 129 performances,[85][91] ultimately closing after Cantor became ill.[92][93] Following Banjo Eyes, the Hollywood returned to showing films exclusively for several years.[80] The film Casablanca, which subsequently became a hit and a classic, premiered at the Hollywood in 1942.[94][95] Among the films screened at the Hollywood in the mid-1940s were This Is the Army (1943),[96] Old Acquaintance (1943),[97] The Adventures of Mark Twain (1944),[98] The Corn is Green (1945),[99] and Night and Day (1946).[100] The Hollywood Theatre became the Warner Theatre in August 1947 with the premiere of the film Life with Father.[83][101]

Mark Hellinger Theatre[edit]

Late 1940s and 1950s[edit]

Signboard and brickwork next to entrance

Wealthy producer Anthony Brady Farrell agreed to purchase the Warner Theatre in June 1948 for about $1.5 million;[102][103] the sale was finalized the next month.[104][105][106] Farrell planned to rename the theater for Mark Hellinger,[107] a Broadway journalist and critic who had died the year before,[108] and he proposed to renovate the theater for legitimate plays and musicals.[104]

The theater was dedicated under its new name on January 16, 1949,[109] and Farrell's musical All for Love opened the next week on January 22, with Paul Hartman, Grace Hartman, and Bert Wheeler.[110][111] All for Love lost money[83] but ran 121 performances.[111][112] This was followed by S. M. Chartock's three-week-long showcase of Gilbert and Sullivan productions in late 1949.[113][114] Despite a string of early losses, as well as a weekly expenditure of $4,500 to $5,000 for the Hellinger's maintenance, Farrell was optimistic about the theater's potential to make money.[115] Farrell's musical Texas Li'l Darlin', featuring Kenny Delmar, opened at the end of 1949.[116] Texas Li'l Darlin' was the first hit in the Hellinger's history,[55] running for 293 performances.[113][117]

Tickets, Please! transferred from the Coronet Theatre in late 1950,[118][119] followed by the Harold Rome revue Bless You All at the end that year.[119][120][121] Premiering in 1951 was Two on the Aisle with Bert Lahr and Dolores Gray,[122][123] which had 279 performances.[124][125] Three Wishes for Jamie opened the next year and lasted for 91 performances.[126][127] Chartock returned in late 1952 with a four-week engagement of Gilbert and Sullivan productions,[126][128] followed by Guthrie McClintic and the Greek National Theater with two plays by Sophocles.[113][129] The musical Hazel Flagg by Jule Styne opened in 1953;[130][131][132] by then The New York Times had reported that the Broadway entrance had been "discontinued".[132] The Broadway lobby was then leased out to a clothier in late 1953.[133]

The Girl in Pink Tights, the final show of the late composer Sigmund Romberg,[134] premiered in 1954[134][135] and closed after 115 performances.[136][137] The Ballets Espagnols also performed at the Hellinger that November for a four-week run.[138][139] The Amish-themed musical Plain and Fancy opened in January 1955[138][140] and was a hit with 461 total performances (some at the Winter Garden Theatre).[136][141] The same year, the Hellinger hosted Ankles Aweigh for 176 performances.[142][143] The Hellinger had its greatest success with the musical My Fair Lady, with a score by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe.[144] My Fair Lady opened in March 1956[138][145] and, with 2,717 total performances, was the longest-running Broadway production ever at the time.[146][147] Prior to the success of My Fair Lady, there was a rumor in the theatrical community that the Hellinger was destined to never host a hit.[148] A year after My Fair Lady opened, Farrell sold the Hellinger to Max and Stanley Stahl, who had already purchased the neighboring building on Broadway.[149][150] The new owners chartered a company called Mark Hellinger Theatre Inc.[150]

1960s to mid-1970s[edit]

Statue and signboard to the west (left) of the entrance

In the 1960s, the Hellinger continued to host several popular musicals.[71] Richard Rodgers and Samuel Taylor tried to stage their musical No Strings, but My Fair Lady's producer refused to move.[151] The New York Supreme Court ruled in February 1962 that My Fair Lady had to relocate,[152][153] but Rodgers and Taylor had booked another theater by then.[154][155] The Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The Sound of Music then transferred to the Hellinger from the Lunt-Fontanne for the last seven months of the musical's run.[156][157] The Italian-language Rugantino was staged in 1964[158][159] with live supertitles on the proscenium,[157][160] though it flopped in spite of critical acclaim.[157] Styne, Betty Comden, and Adolph Green's musical Fade Out – Fade In also opened in 1964,[161] featuring Jack Cassidy and Carol Burnett.[144][162] On a Clear Day You Can See Forever opened in 1965 with a score by Burton Lane and Alan Jay Lerner.[144][163] The same year, a 40-foot-wide (12 m) alcoholic bar was installed in the lounge's rotunda.[31]

The late 1960s was characterized by several unsuccessful musicals.[157] The musical A Joyful Noise in 1966, with choreography by Michael Bennett,[158] ended after just 12 performances.[164][165] The Martha Graham Dance Company had a limited engagement at the theater the next year.[166] Also staged in 1967 was Illya Darling with Melina Mercouri,[158][167] which ran 319 performances[146][168] without turning a profit.[138] A third flop followed in 1968, the Biblical musical I'm Solomon with Dick Shawn and Karen Morrow.[158][169] The same year, the Hellinger hosted ballet performances from Les Ballets Africains;[138][170] a premiere of the documentary New York City—The Most;[171][172] and a limited concert engagement by Marlene Dietrich.[138][173] Two productions followed in 1969: Jerry Herman's Dear World, featuring Angela Lansbury,[174][175] and Alan Jay Lerner and André Previn's Coco, starring Katharine Hepburn in her only Broadway musical.[174][176]

The Hellinger hosted its first Tony Awards ceremony in 1969;[177][178] it also hosted the 1970 Tony Awards.[179][180] The Hellinger next staged the flop Ari[174][181][182] and the final performances of the long-running off-Broadway production Man of La Mancha in 1971.[174][183][184] This was followed the same year by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's Jesus Christ Superstar, another classic,[174][185] which ran for 720 performances[b] over the next two years.[187] A mixture of successes and failures followed.[188] The Martha Graham Dance Company returned in 1974[189][190] and 1975[191][192] to critical acclaim.[188] Conversely, the all-male revival of As You Like It (1974),[193][194] The Skin of Our Teeth (1975),[195] and 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (1976)[196][197] were all flops that managed less than ten performances each.[198] Meanwhile, the Stahls had unofficially put the Hellinger on the market by 1975,[199] and the Nederlander Organization bought the theater the next year.[200]

Late 1970s and 1980s[edit]

The cast of Legs Diamond posing at the theater, 2017

The Hellinger was not successful in its 1978 productions of Timbuktu! with Eartha Kitt[201][202] or Platinum with Alexis Smith.[203][204] This was followed in 1979 by Sarava, a musical with a score by Mitch Leigh;[205][206] the Joffrey Ballet, with featured artist Rudolf Nureyev;[188][207] and The Utter Glory of Morrissey Hall, which closed on its opening night.[208][209][210] The Hellinger finally saw a success in late 1979 when Ann Miller and Mickey Rooney costarred in the burlesque Sugar Babies,[211][212] which ran 1,208 performances over the next three years.[213][214] The Tony Awards returned to the Hellinger in 1980[215][216] and 1981.[217][218] After the closure of Sugar Babies in 1982,[219] Comden and Green produced A Doll's Life, which closed after five performances.[213][220] Magician Doug Henning costarred with Chita Rivera in the 1983 musical Merlin,[221][222] which ran for 199 performances.[213][223] Merlin ended to make way for Chaplin, a musical that never opened.[224] Afterward, the British musical Oliver! had a short run at the Hellinger in 1984.[213][225]

Michael Bennett negotiated to buy a half-interest in the theater's ownership in 1984,[29][226] the same year that Jerry Weintraub purchased a stake in the operation of the Hellinger.[227][228] In 1985, the Hellinger hosted Grind for 75 performances[221][229] and Tango Argentino for about 200 performances.[221][230] The 1985 film A Chorus Line was also partly shot on location at the theater.[231][232] Throughout the remainder of the 1980s, the Hellinger showed short runs, solo shows, and industry bookings.[233] The musical Rags ran for just four performances in 1986,[234][235] and dance production Flamenco Puro appeared later the same year.[236][237] The Hellinger then hosted the 1987 Tony Awards,[238] as well as personal appearances from Smokey Robinson/Jean Carne, Virsky Company, Rodney Dangerfield, and the Georgian State Dance Company.[237] The Hellinger hosted Shakespeare's Macbeth with Glenda Jackson and Christopher Plummer in early 1988.[239][240] At the end of the year,[241] the theater premiered its last-ever legitimate production, Legs Diamond.[242][243]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started to consider protecting the Hellinger as a landmark in 1982,[244] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[245] The LPC designated the Hellinger's interior as a landmark on November 17, 1987,[246] followed by the facade in January 1988.[1] This was part of the commission's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[247] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[248] The Nederlanders, the Shuberts, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Hellinger, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[249] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[250]

Times Square Church[edit]

Lease[edit]

Stage house

In February 1989, the Nederlander Organization leased the Hellinger to the Times Square Church, headed by the Rev. David Wilkerson, for $1 million per year on a five-year lease.[251][252] At the time, the church occupied the 1,150-seat Nederlander Theatre, which was at standing-room only capacity five days a week.[253] In addition, the Broadway theatrical industry was struggling to stage works, and James M. Nederlander said: "It's a short-term lease—five years is short term for me. It'll pass before you know it."[254][252] Had the Nederlanders retained the Hellinger as a legitimate venue, the organization could have rented the theater to a large musical for $1.04 million a year, but it would be far from a consistent income stream.[254] Legs Diamond closed later the same month.[255][256] According to The New York Times: "To many theater people, the leasing of the Hellinger, [...] which has long been considered one of the best and most beautiful theaters for musicals, was a sad symbol of both the state of Broadway and of the Nederlander organization."[257]

The Times Square Church moved to the Hellinger in March 1989.[253] That August, the LPC held a hearing on whether the westernmost 26-foot-wide (7.9 m) section of the theater could be demolished to make way for a hotel developed by Silverstein Properties.[258][259] The planned hotel would have used air rights from above the theater, which would have necessitated restoring the Hellinger for legitimate use.[259] The producer Cameron Mackintosh expressed interest in leasing the Hellinger for his production Miss Saigon in 1990, but he ultimately leased the nearby Broadway Theatre.[260][261] Rocco Landesman of rival chain Jujamcyn Theaters had also offered to buy the theater, but he said high maintenance costs precluded him or any other producer from offering more than $7 million.[262]

Purchase and subsequent years[edit]

Ultimately, in December 1991, the Nederlanders sold the Hellinger to the church[260][263] for a reported $17 million.[262] Wilkerson then spent several years renovating the theater for his congregation.[264] In the years after the Times Square Church's purchase, the church became so popular that the Hellinger could not accommodate all congregants, despite the theater's 1,600-seat capacity.[15][265] The congregation at the theater numbered 4,000 in 1997 and doubled within the next year.[266] As a result, in the late 1990s, an 800-person overflow room and eight secondary meeting rooms was leased in the neighboring Novotel hotel.[265][c] By 2001, screens were installed both in the lobby and in a neighboring annex to allow additional congregants to view services.[15]

Theatrical producers have made several unsuccessful attempts to buy the theater from the Times Square Church. As early as 1993, Andrew Lloyd Webber proposed buying the theater from the Times Square Church for his production of Sunset Boulevard.[268] In addition to Mackintosh and the Bennett estate, offers were reportedly made by former Canadian impresario Garth Drabinsky, theatrical operator Shubert Organization, and corporate producers Disney and Clear Channel.[269] The Times Square Church maintains the theater's historic interior decor and opens the theater to the public for regular services.[269] The church also hosts tours of the theater,[270] as during Christmas 2016, when it gave tours along with live performances of the Nativity play Bethlehem on Broadway.[271][272]

Notable productions[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ William Morrison's book lists the original legal address as 1655 Broadway & 217-33 West 51st Street.[7]
  2. ^ Sometimes cited as 711 performances[186]
  3. ^ The Novotel building was built in the early 1980s over the structure that formerly housed the theater's Broadway entrance.[267]
  4. ^ a b In both 1949 and 1952, the Gilbert & Sullivan plays were performed in the following order: The Mikado; Pirates of Penzance; and H.M.S. Pinafore in repertory with Trial by Jury. Iolanthe was also performed after Trial by Jury and H.M.S. Pinafore in 1952.[275]
  5. ^ a b Presented by Guthrie McClintic and the Greek National Theater as part of their series of two Sophocles plays.[113]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 303. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c "237 West 51 Street, 10019". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  5. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: 50 St (1)". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved December 11, 2015.
  6. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 11.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Morrison, William (1999). Broadway Theatres: History and Architecture (trade paperback). Dover Books on Architecture. Mineola, New York: Dover Publications. p. 163. ISBN 0-486-40244-4.
  8. ^ Allen, Kelcey (October 23, 1929). "Amusements: Provincetown Playhouse Plans Experimental Group". Women's Wear Daily. 39 (81). p. 7. ProQuest 1653332348.
  9. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 22.
  10. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 163.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i Allen, Kelcey (April 20, 1930). "Amusements: Warner Brothers' New Hollywood, B'way At 51st, Has Brilliant Opening: Restful Atmosphere Created". Women's Wear Daily. 40 (80). p. 12. ProQuest 1653814581.
  12. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 15.
  13. ^ a b c d e Theatre Historical Society (U.S.) (2001). Marquee: The Journal of the Theatre Historical Society. The Society. p. 16.
  14. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 22.
  15. ^ a b c d e Dunlap, David W. (April 13, 2001). "Xanadus Rise to a Higher Calling". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  16. ^ Cimino 2013, p. 37.
  17. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 22–23.
  18. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 23.
  19. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 24–25.
  20. ^ a b Corry, John (June 8, 1981). "The World Is Audience at Theater Tribal Ritual". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  21. ^ Coe, Richard L. (June 8, 1980). "The Tonys: A Big Opening Night". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  22. ^ a b Cimino 2013, p. 38.
  23. ^ a b c d "New Film Theatre". The New York Times. April 27, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  24. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 16.
  25. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 24.
  26. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 25.
  27. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 25–26.
  28. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 26.
  29. ^ a b Freedman, Samuel G. (November 9, 1984). "'Chorus Line' Director Seeks to Buy Share of Theater". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  30. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 23–24.
  31. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (August 24, 1965). "More Theaters Installing Bars; Mark Hellinger and Palace to Sell Alcoholic Drinks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  32. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 8.
  33. ^ Hall, Ben M. (1975). The Best Remaining Seats: The Story of the Golden Age of the Movie Palace. C. N. Potter. p. 12. ISBN 978-0-517-02057-9.
  34. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 9.
  35. ^ "Warner Bros. Plan Broadway Motion Picture Show House". New York Herald Tribune. April 3, 1929. p. 45. ProQuest 1111201657.
  36. ^ a b "Assemble Theatre Site; Warner Brothers Plan New House in 51st Street, Near Broadway". The New York Times. April 3, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  37. ^ a b "Warner Brothers To Build Broadway Theatre". Women's Wear Daily. 38 (68). April 6, 1929. p. 13. ProQuest 1699911181.
  38. ^ "Harvard Glee Club Sings Varied Concert Program". New York Herald Tribune. April 7, 1929. p. 20. ProQuest 1111999937.
  39. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 14.
  40. ^ Hall, Mordaunt (April 23, 1930). "'Hold Everything' Opens New Theatre; Walker and Mayor Mackey of Philadelphia Speak at Ceremonies in the Hollywood". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  41. ^ "Black And White Favored At Hollywood Theatre Premiere: Ermine Over Black Gowns And Velvet Wraps Trimmed With White Fox Worn At Opening Of "Hold Everything"". Women's Wear Daily. 40 (80). April 20, 1930. p. 4. ProQuest 1653816946.
  42. ^ "Lindy's to Open Branch In Hollywood Theater". New York Herald Tribune. May 27, 1930. p. 41. ProQuest 1125413214.
  43. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 164; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 291.
  44. ^ Hall, Mordaunt (August 15, 1930). "The Screen". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  45. ^ Hall, Mordaunt (October 31, 1930). "The Screen; The Beggar of Bagdad. A Load of Laughter". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
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  47. ^ Watts, Richard (October 24, 1931). "On the Screen: 'The Mad Genius'--Hollywood John Barrymore". New York Herald Tribune. p. 10. ProQuest 1114230202.
  48. ^ Allen, Kelcey (January 27, 1932). "Amusements: Popular Price Scale For Hollywood Theatre". Women's Wear Daily. 44 (18). p. 13. ProQuest 1653172223.
  49. ^ "Revue for Film Theatre; Hollywood to Be Opened Feb. 15 With Lou Holtz Heading Bill". The New York Times. January 25, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  50. ^ J.b (February 16, 1932). "Mr. Holtz Experiments". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  51. ^ "Lou Holtz to End Vaudeville-revues; Says Strain of Producing and Acting Is Reason for Aban- doning His Project". The New York Times. April 21, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  52. ^ "First Radio City Show Is Announced in Part; Martha Graham and Kreutzberg, Tuskegee Choir, and Possibly Amos 'n' Andy to Appear". The New York Times. November 22, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  53. ^ "Vaudeville: Vaude Back to Broadway Area With Heavy Plans Announced". The Billboard. 44 (48): 6. November 26, 1932. ProQuest 1032011568.
  54. ^ "Rialto Theatre Closes Its Doors; Paramount-PublixRelinquishes Control After 15 Years Owing to Admissions Slump". The New York Times. February 2, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  55. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 164.
  56. ^ "Warners Buying Realty.: Site Back of Hollywood Theatre May Be Used for Expansion". The New York Times. August 19, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  57. ^ "Building Near 5th Avenue Purchased by Investor; Port Authority Buys Flat". New York Herald Tribune. January 19, 1934. p. 34. ProQuest 1222206041.
  58. ^ "Pictures: N. Y. Legiter to House 'Citizen Kane' Day-and-Date With RKO Palace, B'way". Variety. 142 (5): 6. April 9, 1941. ProQuest 1285762120.
  59. ^ "Calling All Stars' for the Hollywood; Revue, Prepared by Lew Brown, to Reopen Theatre During Thanksgiving Week". The New York Times. October 1, 1934. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  60. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 164; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 291; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 19.
  61. ^ a b c The Broadway League (December 13, 1934). "Calling All Stars – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
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  62. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 14, 1934). "The Play; Lou Holtz and Phil Baker in a Revue Entitled 'Calling All Stars.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  63. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 164; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 291; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 28.
  64. ^ Brown, Gene (1995). Movie Time: A Chronology of Hollywood and the Movie Industry from Its Beginnings to the Present. New York: Macmillan. p. 125. ISBN 0-02-860429-6.
  65. ^ Sennwald, Andre (October 10, 1935). "Warner Brothers Present the Max Reinhardt Film of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' at the Hollywood -- 'Pepo' at the Cameo". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  66. ^ a b Allen, Kelcey (March 2, 1936). "Amusements: Carroll Wants Hollywood Theatre". Women's Wear Daily. 52 (43). p. 9. ProQuest 1653643742.
  67. ^ "News of the Theaters: Cohan Returns to Broadway". New York Herald Tribune. March 2, 1936. p. 10A. ProQuest 1237461906.
  68. ^ "Abbott 'Sweet River' Due Oct. 28 at 51st St.; Next Week's 8 Shows". Daily News. September 24, 1936. p. 688. Retrieved December 15, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  69. ^ "Legitimate: Wholesale Switching of B.O. Men On Broadway as Indies Take Over". Variety. 124 (3): 55. September 30, 1936. ProQuest 1475908167.
  70. ^ a b "B'way Front OK For Pix; Side St. Entrance For Legits--WB's Idea". Variety. 123 (13): 1, 59. September 9, 1936. ProQuest 1475904626.
  71. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 19.
  72. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 29, 1936). "The Play; ' Sweet River,' Being George Abbott's Version of 'Uncle Tom's Cabin.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  73. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 28, 1936). "Sweet River – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
    "Sweet River Broadway @ Hollywood Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  74. ^ a b "Pictures: WB's 51st St., N.Y., as Permanent $2 House". Variety. 127 (6): 25. July 21, 1937. ProQuest 1505676925.
  75. ^ Allen, Kelcey (August 12, 1937). ""The Life Of Emile Zola" A Superb Screen Production: (Hollywood Theatre)". Women's Wear Daily. 55 (30). p. 26. ProQuest 1653664262.
  76. ^ a b "Many Celebrities at Opening of 'Zola'; Capacity Audience of 1,400 Sees Film--Special Traffic Detail Handles Crowd". The New York Times. August 12, 1937. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  77. ^ "Knights of Song' Opening Tonight; Gilbert and Sullivan Parts to Be Played by Nigel Bruce and John Moore". The New York Times. October 17, 1938. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  78. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 28, 1939). "George White's Scandals [1939] – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "George White's Scandals [1939] Broadway @ Alvin Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  79. ^ "News of the Stage; 'Scandals' to Close Dec. 9--Four Plays End Their Runs Tonight--'Male Animal' Finds a Sponsor". The New York Times. November 25, 1939. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  80. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 164; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 292; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 19.
  81. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (May 10, 1940). "The Play in Review; Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh Act the Title Roles in a Revival of Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet' at the Fifty-first Street Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  82. ^ ""Romeo And Juliet" Rich In Color And Silhouette Inspiration—Suggests New Formal Costume Types: Caramel Browns With Soft Medium Blues A Favorite Combination—Vivien Leigh Wears Frocks With Richly Embroidered Bodice—Soft Colorful Boots, Interesting Jackets And Capes Further Design Influence". Women's Wear Daily. 60 (93). May 10, 1940. p. 4. ProQuest 1699916272.
  83. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 164; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 292.
  84. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 9, 1940). "Romeo and Juliet – Broadway Play – 1940 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Romeo and Juliet Broadway @ 51st Street Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  85. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 292; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 29.
  86. ^ Martin, John (October 15, 1940). "Season Is Opened by Ballet Russe; Monte Carlo Dancers Are at the Fifty-first Street Theatre After South American Tour". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  87. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 14, 1940). "Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo – Broadway Special – 1940 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
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  88. ^ Martin, John (November 3, 1940). "The Dance: Vale Et Ave; Monte Carlo Ballet Gives Way to de Basil Company at the Fifty-first Street". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  89. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 3, 1940). "Original Ballet Russe, Colonel de Basil's – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
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  90. ^ "Owen Davis Play Is Relinquished; F-S-K Corporation Released From Agreement to Stage 'Family Honeymoon'". The New York Times. July 30, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  91. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 25, 1941). "Banjo Eyes – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Banjo Eyes Broadway @ Hollywood Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  92. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 292.
  93. ^ "Show Is Terminated by Illness of Cantor; 60 in 'Banjo Eyes' Jobless -- Star on Radio From Hospital". The New York Times. April 16, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  94. ^ Gelmis, Joseph (April 10, 1992). "Here's Looking at You, 'Casablanca': As Time Goes by, This Film Is Better Than Ever". Newsday. pp. 84, 85. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
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  96. ^ Strauss, Theodore (August 1, 1943). "Salute to 'This Is the Army'; The Warner Brothers' Version of Irving Berlin's Fabulous Hit Is a Fine Expression of the Screen's Public Spirit". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  97. ^ Crowther, Bosley (November 3, 1943). "The Screen; 'Old Acquaintance,' With Bette Davis and Miriam Hopkins, a Drama of Two Women, Opens at Hollywood Theatre Here". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  98. ^ "Of Local Origin". The New York Times. May 3, 1944. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  99. ^ Crowther, Bosley (March 30, 1945). "The Screen in Review; Corn Is Green,' Starring Bette Davis in Role Played on the Stage by Ethel Barrymore, Opens at Hollywood Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  100. ^ "The Screen; 'Night and Day,' Warner Version of Cole Porter's Life, Opens at Hollywood--Cary Grant and Monty Woolley in Leads". The New York Times. July 26, 1946. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  101. ^ "' Life With Father,' Starring William Powell, Irene Donne, Recaptures Charm That Made the Lindsay-Crouse Play a Hit". The New York Times. August 16, 1947. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  102. ^ Zolotow, Sam (June 9, 1948). "Spending 2 Million to Make Show Pay; A.B. Farrell to Buy Warner Theatre to House 'Hold It!,' Losing $10,000 Weekly". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  103. ^ McCord, Bert (June 9, 1948). "News of the Theaters: Farrell Buys Warner Theater". New York Herald Tribune. p. 18. ProQuest 1335358040.
  104. ^ a b "Warners Sell Large Theater On Broadway: Anthony B. Farrell Will Use Building at 51st St. for Legitimate Shows". New York Herald Tribune. July 18, 1948. p. D2. ProQuest 1324163377.
  105. ^ Calta, Louis (July 13, 1948). "Offer of Pay Rise Refused by Equity; Actors' Unit Spurns Increase of $15 in Minimums -- Groups Meet Again Tomorrow". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  106. ^ Sylvester, Robert (July 13, 1948). "Hey, Look! Real New Money Is Handled by Broadway Boys!". Daily News. p. 389. Retrieved December 15, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
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  108. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 164; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 19.
  109. ^ "Heart Unit Sponsors Tribute to Hellinger". The New York Times. January 17, 1949. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  110. ^ Calta, Louis (January 22, 1949). "Premiere Tonight of 'All for Love'; Revue Starring the Hartmans and Bert Wheeler Will Bow at Mark Hellinger Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  111. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 292–293; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 29.
  112. ^ The Broadway League (January 22, 1949). "All for Love – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
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  113. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 293.
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  117. ^ The Broadway League (November 25, 1949). "Texas, Li'l Darlin' – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
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  118. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 1950). "Tickets, Please! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
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  122. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 164; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 293; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 19.
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  126. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 293; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 30.
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  128. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 11, 1952). "At the Theatre; ' Iolanthe' Put On by S. M. Chartock's Gilbert and Sullivan Company at the Mark Hellinger". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  129. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 25, 1952). "' Oedipus Tyrannus' Is Second Bill Put On by Greek National Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
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  132. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (February 11, 1953). "Premiere Tonight for 'Hazel Flagg'; Miss Gallagher Bowing as Star in Styne-Farrell Musical at Hellinger Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  133. ^ "Broadway Space Leased; Former Theatre Lobby to Be Occupied by Clothier". The New York Times. October 31, 1953. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
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  138. ^ a b c d e f Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 294.
  139. ^ Martin, John (November 1, 1954). "Teresa, Luisillo Open Ballet Run; Husband-and-Wife Team and Company Offer a Spanish Program at Hellinger". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  140. ^ Calta, Louis (January 27, 1955). "'Plain and Fancy' Arrives Tonight; Musical Comedy Will Have Its Debut at Hellinger -- Scene Is Amish Pennsylvania". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  141. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 27, 1955). "Plain and Fancy – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Plain and Fancy Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  142. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 18, 1955). "Ankles Aweigh – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Ankles Aweigh Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
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  145. ^ Calta, Louis (March 15, 1956). "Curtain to Rise on 'My Fair Lady'; Musical 'Pygmalion' Arrives Tonight at Hellinger With Harrison, Julie Andrews". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  146. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 294; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 31.
  147. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 15, 1956). "My Fair Lady – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "My Fair Lady Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  148. ^ Gamerman, Ellen (August 29, 2009). "A Web of Superstition". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved December 17, 2021.
  149. ^ "Theatre Is Acquired; Hellinger, Where 'My Fair Lady' Is Playing, Sold to Stahls". The New York Times. March 19, 1957. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
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  155. ^ Sylvester, Robert (February 20, 1962). "Dream Street". Daily News. p. 86. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  156. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 16, 1959). "The Sound of Music – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
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  157. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 165; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 294.
  158. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 165; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 294; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 31.
  159. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 6, 1964). "Rugantino – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Rugantino Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  160. ^ "Irishman 'Moves' Italian Musical; Linguist at 'Rugantino' Runs Projector With Titles". The New York Times. February 14, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  161. ^ "Theater: 'Fade Out—Fade In' Opens; Carol Burnett Stars in Musical at Hellinger". The New York Times. May 27, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  162. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 26, 1964). "Fade Out - Fade In – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Fade Out - Fade In Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  163. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 17, 1965). "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  164. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 15, 1966). "A Joyful Noise – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "A Joyful Noise Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  165. ^ Calta, Louis (December 24, 1966). "Sad Silence Falls on 'Joyful Noise'; Producer of Closing Musical Blames Critics' Reporting". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  166. ^ Barnes, Clive (March 8, 1967). "Dance: Graham Season Nears Its End; Pleasing Newcomer in 'Appalachian Spring'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  167. ^ Kerr, Walter (April 12, 1967). "Theater: Melina Mercouri in Musical 'Illya Darling'; Show Is Adaptation of 'Never on Sunday'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  168. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 11, 1967). "Illya Darling – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Illya Darling Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  169. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 23, 1968). "I'm Solomon – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "I'm Solomon Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  170. ^ Barnes, Clive (February 25, 1968). "Ballet Across The Seas". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  171. ^ "500 View Premiere of Film on New York". The New York Times. June 4, 1968. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
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  174. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 165; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 294; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 32.
  175. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 6, 1969). "Dear World – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Dear World Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  176. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 18, 1969). "Coco – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Coco Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  177. ^ "Legitimate: Tony Award Sidelights". Variety. 254 (10): 72. April 23, 1969. ProQuest 1505839722.
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  180. ^ Gent, George (April 20, 1970). "'Applause' and Bacall Win Tonys". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  181. ^ The Broadway League (January 15, 1971). "Ari – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
    "Ari Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  182. ^ "'Ari' Will End Brief Run". The New York Times. January 27, 1971. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  183. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 22, 1965). "Man of La Mancha – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Man of La Mancha Broadway @ ANTA Washington Square Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  184. ^ "La Mancha' to Close At 2,328 Performances". The New York Times. June 16, 1971. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  185. ^ Bahr, Sarah (October 12, 2021). "'Jesus Christ Superstar' at 50: What Was the Buzz?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
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    "Jesus Christ Superstar Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  187. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 294–296; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 32.
  188. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 296.
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  191. ^ Barnes, ByClive (December 14, 1975). "Dance: Martha Graham's 'Appalachian Spring'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  192. ^ Zakariasen, Bill (December 10, 1975). "A golden Graham gets going". Daily News. p. 83. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
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    "As You Like It Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  194. ^ "'As You Like It,' 'Thieves' To End Runs on Broadway". The New York Times. December 7, 1974. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
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    "The Skin of Our Teeth Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  196. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 4, 1976). "1600 Pennsylvania Avenue – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  197. ^ "'1600 Pennsylvania' Will Close Tomorrow". The New York Times. May 7, 1976. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  198. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 296; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 32.
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  201. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 166; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 296; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 19.
  202. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 1, 1978). "Timbuktu! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Timbuktu! Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  203. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 166; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 296; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 33.
  204. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 12, 1978). "Platinum – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Platinum Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  205. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 166; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 296; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 32.
  206. ^ The Broadway League (February 23, 1979). "Saravá – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
    "Saravá Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  207. ^ "Ballet. Nureyev Dances 'Petrouchka'". The New York Times. March 8, 1979. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  208. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 296; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 33.
  209. ^ Eder, Richard (May 15, 1979). "Stage: 'Second Thoughts,' a Musical". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  210. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 13, 1979). "The Utter Glory of Morrissey Hall – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "The Utter Glory of Morrissey Hall Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  211. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 166; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 296–297; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 19.
  212. ^ Kerr, Walter (October 9, 1979). "Stage: 'Sugar Babies,' Burlesque Is Back". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  213. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 297; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 33.
  214. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 8, 1979). "Sugar Babies – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Sugar Babies Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  215. ^ Blau, Eleanor (June 9, 1980). "Tonys to 'Children of Lesser God,' 'Evita'; Win Choreography Award". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  216. ^ "Legitimate: 'Evita,' With 7 Wins, Tops 'Tonys'; 'Lesser God.' 3 Nods, Leads Plays". Variety. 299 (6): 83, 88. June 11, 1980. ProQuest 1438315261.
  217. ^ Blau, Eleanor (June 8, 1981). "Tonys to Lauren Bacall, 'Amadeus,' '42d Street'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  218. ^ "Legitimate: 'Amadeus,' 'Pirates' Favorites As Best-Show 'Tony' Contenders". Variety. 303 (5): 81, 84. June 3, 1981. ProQuest 1438315961.
  219. ^ Daley, Suzanne (August 30, 1982). "A Tearful Goodbye for 'Sugar Babies'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  220. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 23, 1982). "A Doll's Life – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "A Doll's Life Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  221. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 166; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 297; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 33.
  222. ^ Kerr, Walter (February 20, 1983). "Stage View; Why Make the Audience Do All the Work?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  223. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 13, 1983). "Merlin – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Merlin Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  224. ^ Freedman, Samuel G. (November 10, 1983). "Why 'Chaplin' Is Not Opening on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  225. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 29, 1984). "Oliver! – Broadway Musical – 1984 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Oliver! Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  226. ^ Hummler, Richard (November 14, 1984). "Legitimate: Bennett Ankles Shubert Sphere, Takes 'Scandal' To Nederlander, Gets Half Interest In Hellinger". Variety. 317 (3): 99, 106. ProQuest 1438436369.
  227. ^ Freedman, Samuel G. (September 26, 1984). "Weintraub Buys Interest in Nederlander Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  228. ^ "Hollywood figure buys into theaters". Newsday. September 27, 1984. p. 171. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  229. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 16, 1985). "Grind – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Grind Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  230. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 9, 1985). "Tango Argentino – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Tango Argentino Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  231. ^ Berman, Janice (February 10, 1985). "Getting a kick out of 'Chorus Line'". Newsday. p. 123. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  232. ^ Gold, Richard (February 6, 1985). "Pictures: 'A Chorus Line' Ready To Wrap; Producer Sees Wide Audience". Variety. 318 (2): 6, 26. ProQuest 1438429720.
  233. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 166.
  234. ^ Koenenn, Joseph C. (August 28, 1986). "The Producers Decide 'Rags' Won't Reopen". Newsday. p. 209. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
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    "Rags Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  236. ^ Kisselgoff, Anna (November 2, 1986). "Dance View; Savoring The Art And Mystery of Flamenco". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  237. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 297.
  238. ^ Gerard, Jeremy (June 8, 1987). "'Les Miserables' and 'Fences' Win Top Tonys". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  239. ^ "'Macbeth' to Close June 26". The New York Times. June 18, 1988. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  240. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 21, 1988). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 1988 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Macbeth Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  241. ^ Rich, Frank (December 27, 1988). "Review/Theater; 'Legs' Opens After 9-Week Preview". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  242. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1988). "Legs Diamond – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Legs Diamond Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  243. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 166; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 298.
  244. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
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  247. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  248. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). "28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  249. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). "Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters' Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
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  251. ^ "A Church to Occupy the Mark Hellinger Theater". Newsday. February 9, 1989. p. 155. Retrieved December 14, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  252. ^ a b "Hellinger Theater Going to Church". Back Stage. 30 (7): 4A. February 17, 1989. ProQuest 962771570.
  253. ^ a b Singleton, Don (March 5, 1989). "SRO for Jesus on Broadway". Daily News. p. 23. Retrieved December 14, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  254. ^ a b Rothstein, Mervyn (February 8, 1989). "The Hellinger Theater Is Leased to a Church". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  255. ^ "'Legs Diamond' to Close". The New York Times. February 16, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  256. ^ "Curtain comes down on 'Legs'; theater to become church". The Herald Statesman. February 20, 1989. p. 7. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  257. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (May 24, 1989). "Empty Theaters Bringing Concerts to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  258. ^ Dunlap, David W. (August 23, 1989). "Developer Plans 52-Story Hotel Atop 2 Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  259. ^ a b Berkowitz, Harry (August 23, 1989). "Luxury Hotel Planned Atop B'way Theaters". Newsday. pp. 21, 28. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  260. ^ a b Collins, Glenn (December 7, 1991). "Hellinger Theater Sold To Church". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  261. ^ ""Miss Saigon" Finds Home & Record Prices". Back Stage. 31 (9): 3A. March 9, 1990. ProQuest 962913634.
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  263. ^ "Hellinger Sold To Church Group". Back Stage. 32 (50): 4. December 13, 1991. ProQuest 962935922.
  264. ^ Maurer, Daniel (December 4, 2005). "New York in Focus; Now Showing: God". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 17, 2021.
  265. ^ a b French, Liz (September 1998). "Changing times". TCI. 32 (8): 16–18. ProQuest 209646778.
  266. ^ Bell, Charles W.; Allen, Michael O. (April 12, 1998). "City's Multitudes Catching the Spirit". Daily News. pp. 6, 7. Retrieved December 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
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  269. ^ a b Simonson, Robert (November 16, 2010). "Will the Mark Hellinger Theater Ever See a Show Again?". Playbill. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  270. ^ Culwell-Block, Logan (July 6, 2019). "9 Former Broadway Theatres Still Visible Today". Playbill. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  271. ^ Viagas, Robert (December 13, 2016). "Times Square Church Offers Tours of Broadway's Former Mark Hellinger Theatre December 17". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  272. ^ Rajamani, Maya (December 12, 2016). "Times Square Church Staging Outdoor Nativity Play Featuring Live Animals". DNAinfo New York. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  273. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 28.
  274. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 29.
  275. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, pp. 29–30.
  276. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 30.
  277. ^ The Broadway League (November 19, 1952). "Electra – Broadway Play – 1952 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  278. ^ The Broadway League (November 24, 1952). "Oedipus Tyrannus – Broadway Play – 1952 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Oedipus Tyrannus Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  279. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 31.
  280. ^ The Broadway League (May 8, 1962). "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Broadway @ Alvin Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  281. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 32.
  282. ^ The Broadway League (March 18, 1973). "Seesaw – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Seesaw Broadway @ Uris Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  283. ^ The Broadway League (September 25, 1976). "Porgy and Bess – Broadway Musical – 1976 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Porgy and Bess Broadway @ Uris Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  284. ^ The Broadway League (January 7, 1975). "Shenandoah – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Shenandoah Broadway @ Alvin Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  285. ^ The Broadway League (November 23, 1977). "Lou Rawls on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
    "Lou Rawls on Broadway Broadway @ Mark Hellinger Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2021.
  286. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1988, p. 33.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]