Mark Hertsgaard

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Mark Hertsgaard at the 2011 Brooklyn Book Festival

Mark Hertsgaard (born 1956) is an American journalist and author who is the environmental correspondent for The Nation.[1] He was formerly a cultural reporter for New Yorker magazine. His best-known work as an author is On Bended Knee: The Press and the Reagan Presidency (1988), which described the way the Reagan White House "deployed raw power and conventional wisdom to intimidate Washington's television newsrooms".[2] He has also written for magazines and newspapers such as Vanity Fair, Time, Harper’s, The Guardian and Le Monde, and for the website Salon.com.[3]

Life[edit]

Hertsgaard received a B.A. from Johns Hopkins University in 1977 and was one of the founders of the Baltimore City Paper. According to his fellow Johns Hopkins alumnus Russ Smith, he worked in the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC after graduation.[4]

Whilst compiling a feature article for The New Yorker in 1993, Hertsgaard broke the news that the three surviving members of the Beatles were due to issue previously unreleased music from the group's career, as part of their multimedia Anthology project, in addition to reuniting to work on new recordings.[5] At this time, he was granted rare access to the band's EMI recording archives in London, gaining an insight that informed his 1995 book A Day in the Life: The Music and Artistry of the Beatles.[5]

During the 1990s, Hertsgaard's attention turned to the ecology of the Earth. He embarked upon a seven-year global tour to investigate the issue of environmental degradation. The journey spanned four continents, 19 countries and hundreds of interviews.[2] This resulted in the book Earth Odyssey: Around the World in Search of Our Environmental Future (1999), which was reviewed favorably in The New York Times Book Review and Time magazine.[6]

Hertsgaard also wrote climate change adaptation, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, titled Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth (2011).[1] From 2011 to 2013, he was Schmidt Family Foundation Fellow at New America Foundation researching the linked challenges of climate change, food security, poverty and ecological agriculture.

During a Mother's Day second line parade in New Orleans in 2013, Hertsgaard was shot and wounded along with 19 other people at the corner of Frenchmen Street and North Villere in the city's 7th Ward.[7]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bravehearts: Whistle Blowing in the Age of Snowden (2016)
  • Hot: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth (2010)
  • The Eagle's Shadow: Why America Fascinates and Infuriates the World (2002)
  • Earth Odyssey: Around the World in Search of Our Environmental Future (1998)
  • A Day in the Life: The Music and Artistry of the Beatles (1995)
  • On Bended Knee: The Press and the Reagan Presidency (1988)
  • Nuclear Inc: The Men and Money (1983)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mark Hertsgaard biography". The Nation. Retrieved April 18, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schneider, Keith (January 17, 1999). "A Dirty Shame: A journalist offers an environmental report card on the planet". The New York Times. 
  3. ^ "Stories by Mark Hertsgaard". AlterNet. Retrieved April 18, 2017. 
  4. ^ Smith, Russ (November 2016). "Pictures of You (#60)". Splice Today. Retrieved April 18, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Kimsey, John (2009). "'An Abstraction, Like Christmas': The Beatles for sale and for keeps". In Womack, Kenneth (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to the Beatles. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 232. ISBN 978-0-521-68976-2. 
  6. ^ Skow, John (January 11, 1999). "Travels on an Ailing Planet: An eco-conscious Marco Polo has sad tales to tell". Time. 
  7. ^ Hertsgaard, Mark (May 14, 2013). "I Got Shot in New Orleans". 

External links[edit]