Mark Hudis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mark Hudis
Born (1968-02-19) February 19, 1968 (age 49)
Tarrytown, New York, U.S.A.
Occupation Television writer, producer
Years active 1997–present

Mark Hudis (born February 19, 1968) is an American television writer and producer who has worked on a variety of shows including Cybill, That '70s Show, Nurse Jackie and True Blood. In 2010, his work on Nurse Jackie earned him both Writers Guild of America and Emmy Award nominations.[1] Hudis attended Haverford College, a liberal arts school located outside of Philadelphia, and graduated in 1990.

He began his career writing for magazines. His work has appeared in MAD, GQ and Playboy.

Career[edit]

Hudis began his writing career in 1997 when he received story credit for the Cybill episode "Like Family". He co-wote the episode "Bakersfield" with Alan Ball in 1998 and was then recruited as a writer and story editor on the Fox sitcom That '70s Show. He remained a writer on the series for its entire eight season run, eventually becoming an executive producer at the beginning of its seventh season. He wrote a total of twenty-two episodes during the show's run. He became a writer and co-executive producer on Showtime's Nurse Jackie in 2009 and was an executive producer during the show's second season in 2010.[2] Hudis worked on the writing staff of Alan Ball's vampire series True Blood for its fourth season in 2011.[3]

Awards and nominations[edit]

In 2011, Hudis received a Writers Guild of America award nomination and an Emmy award nomination for Nurse Jackie, which he shared with the entire writing staff.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kilday, Gregg (January 4, 2011). "'Inception,' 'Fighter,' 'The Kids Are All Right' Among Writers Guild Nominees". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 29, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Mark Hudis". Film.com. Retrieved March 29, 2011. 
  3. ^ Lynnpd (February 8, 2011). "Season 4 Episode Guide: Episode 4.05 – "I Hate You, I Love You"". True Blood Online. Retrieved March 29, 2011. 

External links[edit]