Mark S. Martins

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Mark S. Martins
BG Mark S. Martins
BG Mark S. Martins
Born ca. 1960
Allegiance USA
Service/branch Emblem of the United States Department of the Army.svg United States Army
Years of service 1979-Present
Rank US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General

Mark S. Martins (born ca. 1960) is a Brigadier General in the United States Army Judge Advocate General's Corps. His final position was Chief Prosecutor of Military Commissions, overseeing the trial of Khalid Sheik Mohammed and four co-defendants.[1][2][3]

Education[edit]

Martins received his Bachelor of Science (BS) from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1983, graduating first in his class. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship and attended Balliol College at the University of Oxford, graduating in 1985 with 1st class honors.[4] He also holds a Juris Doctor (JD) from Harvard Law School (where he served on the Harvard Law Review with Barack Obama and graduated magna cum laude),[5] a Master of Laws (LLM) in Military Law from the The Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School in Charlottesville, Virginia (graduating first in his class), and a Master of Military Arts and Sciences (MMAS) from the Command and General Staff College (graduating first in his class). His military education includes: the Infantry Officer Basic Course, the Judge Advocate Officer Basic Course, the Judge Advocate Officer Graduate Course, the Combined Arms and Services Staff School, the Command and General Staff College, and the National War College.

Military Career[edit]

Martins commissioned into the Infantry branch, and served as a platoon leader in the 82nd Airborne Division. In 1987, he was accepted into the Army's Funded Legal Education Program (FLEP). Upon his graduation from Harvard Law School in 1990, Martins became a Judge Advocate in the United States Army Judge Advocate General's Corps.[6]

From 2006 to 2008, he led the Rule of Law campaign for Multi-National Force - Iraq. While in Iraq, Martins coordinated the work of United States and coalition investigative, corrections, and judicial experts and directed MNF-I support to Iraq’s courts and law enforcement institutions. He is reportedly a close friend of General David Petraeus, and the two frequently went running together in Iraq.[7] In September 2009 he was appointed the Deputy Commanding General of Joint Task Force 435, charged with reforming military detention operations in Afghanistan. By February 2010 he was overseeing detainee operations at the Detention Facility in Parwan (DFIP) which replaced the Bagram Theater Internment Facility.[8]

In the fall of 2010, Martins assumed command of the new Rule of Law Field Force - Afghanistan, which works to transform problem areas into secure and accountable legal environments. In a lecture following his acceptance of Harvard Law School's Medal of Freedom in 2011, Martins said, "[Afghanistan’s] lack of governance … is accompanied by a lack of confidence in the government’s ability to deliver justice, resolve civil disputes and address a perceived culture of impunity among the powerful. Establishing the rule of law in these districts is critical to the kind of sound governance that will enable an enduring transition of security responsibility to Afghan forces and deny that rugged country as a sanctuary for global threats.”[9]

Military Awards[edit]

Martins is a recipient of the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star (two awards), and the Meritorious Service Medal (multiple awards). His badges include the Ranger Tab, the Expert Infantryman Badge, the Senior Parachutist Badge, the Pathfinder Badge, and the Air Assault Badge.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Finn, Peter (2011-06-23). "Pentagon names new Guantanamo prosecutor". Washington Post. Retrieved 28 July 2011. 
  2. ^ "Deputy Commanding General Joint Task Force 435". Department of Defense. 2009-09-18. Archived from the original on 2010-03-02. 
  3. ^ Arthur B. Spritzer (2010-02-26). "Jalatzai v. Gates" (PDF). United States Department of Justice. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-03-02. 
  4. ^ http://www.centcom.mil/en/jtf435/brigadier-general-mark-s.-martins.html
  5. ^ http://www.weeklystandard.com/keyword/Mark-Martins
  6. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdAI9nMr_2U
  7. ^ http://www.weeklystandard.com/keyword/Mark-Martins
  8. ^ "New task force assumes control of detainee operations in Afghanistan". Department of Defense. 2010-01-08. Archived from the original on 2010-03-02. Martins, an Army judge advocate and former infantryman, led the rule of law campaign in Iraq from 2006 to 2008 while serving with Army Gen. David Petraeus in Multi-National Force - Iraq. While in Iraq, Martins coordinated the work of United States and coalition investigative, corrections, and judicial experts and directed MNF-I support to Iraq’s courts and law enforcement institutions. Martins was also recently named Chief Judge of U.S. Army Court of Criminal Appeals before being selected to help lead JTF 435. 
  9. ^ "Rule of law in Afghanistan is critical to an enduring transition of governance, says HLS Medal of Freedom recipient Brig. Gen. Mark Martins '90". Harvard Law School News and Events. Harvard Law School. Retrieved 28 July 2011. 
  10. ^ http://www.centcom.mil/en/jtf435/brigadier-general-mark-s.-martins.html
  11. ^ http://www.charlottelaw.org/about/brigadier-general-mark-martins-speak