Mark Pagel

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Mark Pagel
Born Mark David Pagel
(1954-06-05) 5 June 1954 (age 64)[1]
Seattle, Washington, US[1]
Alma mater University of Washington
Partner(s) Ruth Mace
Awards FRS (2011)
Scientific career
Fields
Institutions
Thesis Determinants of the Success and Failure of Ridge Regression (1980)
Website evolution.reading.ac.uk

Mark David Pagel FRS (born 5 June 1954 in Seattle, Washington)[1] is a Professor and head of the Evolutionary Biology Group at the University of Reading.[1][2][3][4]

Education[edit]

Pagel was educated at the University of Washington where he was awarded a PhD in Mathematics in 1980 for work on ridge regression.[5]

Research[edit]

Pagel's interests include evolution and the development of languages.[6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

Pagel was the editor-in-chief for the Encyclopedia of Evolution published in 2002.[13] and the author of the 2012 book Wired for Culture: The Natural History of Human Cooperation.[14][15]

Personal life[edit]

Pagel's partner is Ruth Mace, Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at University College London[1][16] Together they have two sons.[1]

Awards and honours[edit]

Pagel was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2011. His nomination reads:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "PAGEL, Prof. Mark". Who's Who 2014, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2014; online edn, Oxford University Press. (subscription required)
  2. ^ Staff Profile: Professor Mark Pagel School of Biological Sciences, University of Reading. 24 August 2012. Retrieved 25 August 2012. Archived here
  3. ^ Mark Pagel's publications indexed by the Scopus bibliographic database, a service provided by Elsevier. (subscription required)
  4. ^ Reading Evolutionary Biology Group – Home. Archived here.
  5. ^ Pagel, Mark (2014). Determinants of the Success and Failure of Ridge Regression (PhD thesis). University of Washington. 
  6. ^ English language 'originated in Turkey' by Jonathan Ball, BBC News, 25 August 2012. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  7. ^ Pagel, M. (1999). "Inferring the historical patterns of biological evolution". Nature. 401 (6756): 877–84. doi:10.1038/44766. PMID 10553904. 
  8. ^ Freckleton, R. P.; Harvey, P. H.; Pagel, M. (2002). "Phylogenetic Analysis and Comparative Data: A Test and Review of Evidence". The American Naturalist. 160 (6): 712. doi:10.1086/343873. PMID 18707460. 
  9. ^ Pagel, M. (1997). "Inferring evolutionary processes from phylogenies". Zoologica Scripta. 26 (4): 331. doi:10.1111/j.1463-6409.1997.tb00423.x. 
  10. ^ Pagel, M.; Meade, A.; Barker, D. (2004). "Bayesian Estimation of Ancestral Character States on Phylogenies". Systematic Biology. 53 (5): 673. doi:10.1080/10635150490522232. PMID 15545248. 
  11. ^ Mace, R.; Pagel, M. (1994). "The Comparative Method in Anthropology". Current Anthropology. 35 (5): 549. doi:10.1086/204317. 
  12. ^ Mark Pagel at TED
  13. ^ Encyclopedia of Evolution. 2 volume set. USA: OUP. 2002. ISBN 978-0-19-512200-8. Retrieved 2013-03-24. 
  14. ^ Wired for Culture: The Natural History of Human Cooperation ISBN 1846140153
  15. ^ Julian Baggini (23 February 2012). "Wired for Culture by Mark Pagel – review". The Guardian. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  16. ^ Smith, K. (2014). "Love in the lab: Close collaborators". Nature. 510 (7506): 458. doi:10.1038/510458a. PMID 24965634. 
  17. ^ Professor Mark Pagel FRS, The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge