Markus Zusak

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Markus Zusak
Born Markus Frank Zusak
(1975-06-23) 23 June 1975 (age 40)
Occupation Writer
Period 1999–present
Genre Young-adult fiction
Notable awards Edwards Award
Spouse Mika Zusak
Children 2

Markus Frank Zusak, (born 23 June 1975) is an Australian writer. He is best known for The Book Thief and The Messenger (US title, I Am the Messenger), two novels for young adults which have been international best-sellers. He won the annual Margaret Edwards Award in 2014 for his contribution to young-adult literature published in the US.[1]

Life and career[edit]

Zusak was born in Sydney, Australia. His mother Lisa is originally from Germany and his father Helmut is from Austria. They emigrated to Australia in the late 1950s.[2][3] Markus is the youngest of four children and has two sisters and one brother. He attended Engadine High School and briefly returned there to teach English while writing. He studied English and History at the University of New South Wales, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts and a Diploma of Education.

Zusak is the author of six books. His first three books, The Underdog, Fighting Ruben Wolfe and When Dogs Cry, released between 1999 and 2001, were all published internationally and garnered a number of awards. The Underdog, his first book, took seven years to publish. The Messenger, published in 2002, won the 2003 CBC Book of the Year Award (Older Readers) and the 2003 NSW Premier's Literary Award (Ethel Turner Prize) in Australia and was a runner-up for the Printz Award in America.

The Book Thief was published in 2005 and has been translated into more than 30 languages. Beside winning awards in Australia and overseas, The Book Thief has held the number one position at and on the New York Times best-seller list, as well as in Brazil, Ireland and Taiwan. It has been among the top five best sellers in the UK, Spain, Israel and South Korea, and is still set to be released in many other territories. The Book Thief was adapted as a film of the same name in 2013.

Zusak's next novel is Bridge of Clay.



In 2014, Zusak won the Margaret A. Edwards Award from the American Library Association (ALA), which annually recognises an author and "a specific body of his or her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature".[1]

In 2006, Zusak was also the recipient of the Sydney Morning Herald's Young Australian Novelist of the Year Award.

2009 Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis
2008 Ena Noel Award – the IBBY Australia Ena Noël Encouragement Award for Children's Literature[4]
2007 Michael L. Printz Award runner-up (Honor Book) from the US Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)[5]
2006 Kathleen Mitchell Award 2006 (literature)[6]
2007 Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis
2006 Printz Award Honor Book[5]
2006 Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book
2005 Publishers Weekly Best Books of the Year-Children
2003 Children's Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Award
2003 New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards Ethel Turner Prize for Young People's Literature
2002 Honour Book, CBCA Children's Book of the Year Award: Older Readers[7]
2001 Honour Book, CBCA Children's Book of the Year Award: Older Readers[7]
shortlisted for the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards Ethel Turner Prize for Young People's Literature


  1. ^ a b "Edwards Award 2014". Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). American Library Association (ALA).
      "Edwards Award". YALSA. ALA. Retrieved 2015-02-08.
  2. ^ "The Angel of Death Narrates a New Tale for Young Readers –". Retrieved 12 February 2014. 
  3. ^ "Biography of Markus Zusak | List of Works, Study Guides & Essays". GradeSaver. Retrieved 12 February 2014. 
  4. ^ IBBY Australia at Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA)
  5. ^ a b "Michael L. Printz Winners and Honor Books". YALSA. ALA.
      "The Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature". YALSA. ALA. Retrieved 2014-02-12.
  6. ^ "Kathleen Mitchell Award 2006 (literature)". Cauz Group Pty Limited ( Archived from the original on 19 May 2007. Retrieved 14 July 2007. 
  7. ^ a b "Winners 2000–2006 CBCA". Children's Book Council of Australia. Retrieved 26 February 2010. 

External links[edit]