Marla Lukofsky

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Marla Lukofsky
Comedian and Actor Marla Lukofsky.jpg
Born
Marla Lukofsky

(1956-07-03) July 3, 1956 (age 65)
CitizenshipUnited States, Canada
EducationSeneca College, 1978
OccupationStand-up comedian, actor, voice-actor, singer, writer, speaker
Years active1973-present
Websitewww.marlalukofsky.com

Marla Lukofsky is a Canadian-American stand-up comedian, actress, singer, writer, and keynote speaker. She's one of the pioneers of stand-up comedy in Canada and has performed in every major city in North America, the UK and the first female comedian to headline in Bermuda.

Lukofsky has appeared in a variety of TV shows including An Evening at the Improv with Elliott Gould, The Palace TV Variety Series with Jack Jones and The Alan Thicke Show as well as starring in feature films such as Honeymoon with Nathalie Baye and John Shea and Zero Patience.

Marla was a regular radio columnist on The Vicki Gabereau Show and CBC's 'Basic Black' with host Arthur Black and became the regular last word columnist on CBC's national TV news show Midday with Keith Morrison and Valerie Pringle completing 100 segments. Marla has voiced many cartoon series including The Care Bears TV series and movies, Alf Tales, Super Mario Bros, Pecola and Fugget About It.

Early life[edit]

Marla Lukofsky was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1956 to Ruth and Louis Lukofsky and has two older sisters.[1]

Career[edit]

Lukofsky started her career in 1973 as a funny folk singer at the famed Riverboat in Toronto and performed at every folk club in Toronto. In 1975 Marla became a regular at a new comedy club called 'The Improv' with Gene Taylor. Other regulars were Rick Moranis and Martin Short.

By 1978, Marla became a regular headliner at Mark Breslin's Yuk Yuks Comedy chain and toured Canada sharing the bill with Jim Carrey and Howie Mandel. Marla was briefly a member of Toronto's The Second City Touring Company but preferred the nightclub circuit and returned to the road.

For three consecutive years, the PROCAN Music Awards had Marla Lukofsky and John Roberts, host their awards event in 1985-1987. In 1990, Marla moved to Los Angeles and played a variety of nightclubs sharing the bill with comedian Sherri Shepherd at West Hollywood's 'The Rose Tattoo' Cabaret and other establishments.

In 2015 Marla began singing Jazz in Toronto, combining her comedy skills with her vocal talents and in 2016 was featured in the TD Toronto Jazz Festival.

Personal life[edit]

In 1998, Marla was diagnosed with breast cancer and received treatment at Cedars-Sinai and UCLA Medical Center and is now in remission. Since her cancer experience, in addition to her stand-up and voice career, Marla created a one-person show called I'm Still Here...and so is my Hair and toured Canada receiving rave reviews by the press.

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1984 The Get Along Gang Bingo Beaver (voice) - Pilot
1985 Midday Last Word Columnist 100 episodes
1986 The Magical World of Disney: Young Again Suzanne guest star
1986 The Care Bears Family Good Luck Bear / Playful Heart Monkey (voices) Series regular
1989 The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! voice actor Series regular
1987 The Care Bears Adventure in Wonderland Good Luck Bear (voice)
1987 The Magic School Bus voice actor
1987 Starcom: The U.S. Space Force voice actor Series guest
1988-1989 ALF Tales voice actor Series regular
1989 The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! voice actor Series regular
1981 Rubber Face starring Jim Carrey Donna Cherry Co-star
1989 The Twilight Zone revised version Principal role
1990 T. and T. starring Mr. T Brenda co-star
1987 Seeing Things various co-starring roles
1995 Rupert Phoebe (Voice)
2001-2002 Doc Meribeth Weatherbeater guest star, 1 episode
2001-2003 Pecola Series regular voice actor
2004 Care Bears: Forever Friends Playful Heart Monkey, Good Luck Bear (voice)
2010-2011 Scaredy Squirrel Voice actor Series regular
2012 Fugget About It Rosalie (voice) Series guest

Movies[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1985 Honeymoon Sally Co-star
1993 Zero Patience African Green Monkey Co-star

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stand-up becomes inspirational". thestar.com. 2008-06-21. Retrieved 2021-05-22.

External links[edit]