Marlene Dietrich discography

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Marlene Dietrich discography
Marlene Dietrich Sahara Las Vegas.jpg
Studio albums 3
Live albums 4
Video albums 1
Singles 41

Marlene Dietrich's recording career spanned sixty years, from 1928 until 1988. She introduced the songs "Falling in Love Again (Can't Help It)" (from the film The Blue Angel) and "See What the Boys in the Back Room Will Have" (from "Destry Rides Again"). She first recorded her version of "Lili Marlene" in 1945.[citation needed]

Her first long-playing album was Marlene Dietrich Overseas, was a prestige success for Columbia Records in 1950.[1] She also recorded several duets with Rosemary Clooney in the early 1950s: these tapped into a younger market and charted.[2] During the 1960s, Dietrich recorded several albums and many singles, mostly with Burt Bacharach at the helm of the orchestra.[3] Dietrich in London, recorded live at the Queen's Theatre in 1964,[4] is an enduring document of Dietrich in concert.

In 1978, Dietrich's performance of the title track from her last film, Just a Gigolo, was issued as a single.[5] She made her last recordings — spoken introductions to songs for a nostalgia album by Udo Lindenberg — from her Paris apartment in 1987.[6]

Dietrich told Maximilian Schell in his documentary, Marlene (1984), that she thought Marlene singt Berlin-Berlin (1964) – her interpretations of Berliner popular songs from the start of the 20th Century – was her best album.

Long Playing Albums: 1951 - 1988[edit]

Recordings first issued on LP albums:

As featured artist

  • 1988: Hermine: Udo Lindenberg singt Lieder von 1929 bis 1988 (* Spoken verse introduction to Illusions and Wenn ich mir was wünschen dürfte[7])

Selected Compilations[edit]

  • 1949: Souvenir Album
  • 1952: M.D. Live 1932–1952
  • 1959: Lil Marlene
  • 1969: Marlene Dietrich
  • 1973: The Best of Marlene Dietrich
  • 1974: Das war mein Milljöh
  • 1982: Her Complete Decca Recordings
  • 1992: The Marlene Dietrich Album
  • 1992: Art Deco Marlene Dietrich
  • 2007: Marlene Dietrich with the Burt Bacharach Orchestra
  • 2015: The Ultimate Collection

CD compilations which include previously unreleased studio recordings[edit]

  • The Blue Angel — The Original Recordings (Pro Arte, 1990) CDD517. Includes a parody of "See What the Boys in the Back Room Will Have" recorded in 1941 for the wrap party of The Lady is Willing.[8]
  • The Marlene Dietrich Album (Sony Music, 1992) MDK47254. First issue of "Baubles Bangles and Beads" (recorded 1952) and "A Guy What Takes His Time" (1953).[9]
  • Cosmopolitan Marlene Dietrich (Sony Music 1993). First issue of "La Vie en Rose", "No Love, No Nothin'", "Something I Dreamed Last Night", "Let's Call It a Day" (all recorded 1952) and "Falling in Love Again" and "Lili Marlene" (both recorded 1953).[9]
  • Der Blonde Engel (EMI, 2001). First issue of "Wenn ich mir was wünschen dürfte (alternate take, recorded 1930), "Alle Tage Ist Kein Sonntag" (recorded 1954) and "Qui Me Delivera" (1955).[10]

CD compilations which include previously unreleased concert recordings:

  • Der Blonde Engel (EMI, 2001). First issue of "My Baby Just Cares For Me" (recorded in 1961 at the Arie Crown Theatre, Chicago) and "I Refuse To Rock And Roll (recorded in 1955 at the Sahara Hotel's Congo Room in Las Vegas).[10]
  • Marlene Forever (Universal, 2002). First issue of "Moon River" (recorded in 1962 at the Paris Olympia).[10]
  • The Ultimate Collection (Universal, 2015). 44 songs, with 14 unreleased live tracks.

Other[edit]

Many of Dietrich's numerous radio performances have been included on compilations of her music.[7]

The Polish label Wifon issued a cassette tape of a Dietrich concert, recorded in Warsaw in 1966, in 1992 (catalogue number MC283).[11][12] The release contained the following tracks: "I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Baby", "You're the Cream in my Coffee", "My Blue Heaven", "See What the Boys in the Backroom Will Have", "The Laziest Gal in Town", "Shir Hatan", "La Vie en Rose", "Jonny", "Go 'Way From My Window", "Don't Smoke in Bed", "Lola", "Marie-Marie" and "Frag nicht warum ich gehe".

A limited special edition of the book Photographs and Memories (published in 2001 by Nicolai, Berlin) included a recording of the soundtrack of Dietrich's 1963 filmed concert at Berns Salonger as an audio CD bonus.[13]

The Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin's archival holdings include soundtrack prerecording discs and unissued radio and concert recordings.[14]

The following of Dietrich's studio recordings remain unreleased: "Du, du liegst mir im Herzen", "Aus der Jugendzeit", "Das zerbrochene Ringlein", "Treue Liebe" (all recorded July 1954 with Jimmy Carroll and orchestra)[15] and "Wot cher! [Knocked 'Em In the Old Kent Road]" (recorded in 1955 with Wally Stott and orchestra).[16]

Singles: 1928 - 1954[edit]

Recordings first issued on 78 rpm records:[17][18][19][20]

Year Song Title (A-Side) Song Title (B-Side) Label Catalogue Nr Notes
1928 "Wenn die beste Freundin" - Electrola EG 892 Duet with Margo Lion and Oskar Karlweis. From Es liegt in der Luft.
1928 "Potpourri from Es liegt in der Luft, Part 1" "Potpourri from Es liegt in der Luft, Part 2" Electrola EH 146 Selections from the revue performed by the cast.
1930 "Falling in Love Again" "Blonde Women" HMV B 3524 From The Blue Angel. Orchestra: Friedrich Hollaender.
1930 "Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß auf Liebe eingestellt" "Nimm dich in Acht vor blonden Frau'n" Electrola EG 1770 From Der Blaue Engel. Orchestra: Friedrich Hollaender. Two versions of "Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß..." were recorded on different dates. Both were issued under the same catalogue number.
1930 "Ich bin die fesche Lola" "Kinder, heut' abend, da such ich mir was aus" Electrola EG 1802 From Der Blaue Engel. Orchestra: Friedrich Hollaender.
1931 "Wenn ich mir was wünschen dürfte" "Leben ohne Liebe kannst du nicht" Electrola EG 2265 From "Der Mann, der seinen Mörder sucht" / "Nie wieder Liebe". Piano: Friedrich Hollaender / Mischa Spoliansky
1931 "Peter" "Jonny" Ultraphon A 887 Orchestra: Peter Kreuder.
1931 "Jonny" (Alternate Version) Ultraphon AP 249 Orchestra: Peter Kreuder.
1931 "Quand l'Amour Meurt" "Give Me the Man" Electrola EG 2775 From Morocco. Orchestra: Peter Kreuder.
1933 "Assez" "Moi, Je M'Ennuie" Polydor 530000 Orchestra: Peter Kreuder.
1933 "Assez" (Alternate Take) Decca M 452 Orchestra: Peter Kreuder.
1933 "Ja, so bin ich" "Wo ist der Mann?" Polydor 524182 Orchestra: Peter Kreuder.
1933 "Allein in einer grossen Stadt" "Mein blondes Baby" Polydor 530001 Orchestra: Peter Kreuder.
1933 "Wo ist der Mann?" Polydor 47199 Orchestra: Peter Kreuder. Trumpet: Arthur Briggs.
1935 "If It Isn't Pain (Then It Isn't Love)" "Three Sweethearts Have I" Decca The Devil is a Woman promotional issue.
1939 "I've Been In Love Before" "You Do Something To Me" Decca 23139 Orchestra: Victor Young.
1939 "You've Got that Look" "You Go To My Head" Decca 23140 Orchestra: Victor Young.
1939 "Falling in Love Again" "See What the Boys in the Back Room Will Have" Decca 23141 Orchestra: Victor Young.
1945 "Lili Marlene" "Symphonie" Decca 23456 Orchestra: Charles Magnante.
1948 "Illusions" "Black Market" Decca A14582 From A Foreign Affair.
1952 "Too Old to Cut the Mustard" "Good for Nothin'" Columbia 39812 Duets with Rosemary Clooney. Only single to make US pop chart, peaking at No. 12.
1952 "Come Rain or Come Shine" "Love Me" Columbia 39797
1953 "Time For Love" "Look Me Over Closely" Columbia 39959
1953 "Dot's Nice — Donna Fight" "It's The Same" Philips PH 21057 Duets with Rosemary Clooney.
1953 "Besides" "Land Sea and Air" Philips PB 314 Duets with Rosemary Clooney.
1954 "Ich hab' noch einen Koffer in Berlin" "Peter" Columbia 40497

Singles: 1957 - 1978[edit]

Recordings first issued as 7" (45 rpm, except where noted otherwise) singles:[17][18][21]

Year Song Title (A-Side) Song Title (B-Side) Label Catalogue Nr Notes
1957 "Near You" "Another Spring, Another Love" Dot 15645 Recorded in Los Angeles. Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
1957 "I May Never Go Home Anymore" "Kisses Sweeter Than Wine" Dot 15723 Recorded in Los Angeles. Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
1958 "This Evening Children" Electrola 7 EG 1770 From The Blue Angel. Originally recorded in 1930, the English-language version of "Kinder heut' abend..." was first issued in 1958.[22]
1959 "An Interview with Marlene Dietrich" Columbia WPSC49788 Promotional issue for Dietrich in Rio backed by album excerpt.[23]
1962 "Marie-Marie" "Déjeuner du Matin" Pathé EGF597 Recorded in Paris. Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
1962 "Qui peut dire ou vont les fleurs?" "Cherche la Rose" Columbia C83469 Recorded in Paris. Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
1962 "Sag mir wo die Blumen Sind" "Die Welt War Jung" Electrola E22180 Recorded in Paris. Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
1963 "Bitte Geh Nicht Fort"
"Warum Tut Liebe Weh"
"Für Alles Kommt die Zeit"
"Kleine, Treue Nachtigall"
Ariola 40352CU Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
Dietrich was unhappy with the first issued take of "Bitte Geh Nicht Fort"; at her request the record company used an alternate take for all subsequent pressings.[24]
1963 "Die Antwort weiß ganz allein der Wind" "Paff, der Zauberdrachen" Electrola E22612 Recorded in London. Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
1964 "Marie-Marie"
"Das Lied ist aus"
"Where Have All the Flowers Gone?"
"Lola"
Melodia 14217 33⅓ rpm. Live recording from Moscow (May, 1964).
Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.[23]
1965 "If He Swings By The String" "Such Trying Times" Kapp HLR9883
1965 "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" "Blowin' in the Wind" Capitol 72474 Recorded in London. Arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach.
1966 "Candles Glowing" "This World of Ours" Decca 45 32076
1966 "Glocken Läuten" "Still war die Nacht" Philips 45 346024BF German versions of "Candles Glowing" and "This World of Ours".
1967 "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" "Go 'Way From My Window" Columbia 45 444326 Live recordings. Souvenir issue sold at concerts.[7]
1978 "Just a Gigolo" Columbia DB9050 Recorded in Paris. B-side is an orchestral cue from the film soundtrack.

OSS Recordings (1944 - 1945)[edit]

Dietrich recorded the following tracks in Washington in 1944 - 1945 for OSS use:[19]

  • "Mein Mann ist verhindert"
  • "Sag mir Adieu"
  • "Ich hab' die ganze Nacht geweint"
  • "Gib doch den Männern am Stammtisch ihr Gift"
  • "Wo die Wiesen sind"
  • "Fräulein Annie wohnt schon lang nicht hier"
  • "Schlittenfahrt"
  • "Nun kam die Erntezeit"
  • "Du hast 'nen Blick"
  • "Ich Heirate Nie"
  • "Lili Marleen"[25]

These recordings were not meant for commercial issue. "Gib doch den Männern am Stammtisch ihr Gift", "Ich Heirate Nie" and "Du hast 'nen Blick" were issued for the first time in 2001 on Der Blonde Engel (EMI 7242 5 27567 2 7). All the other tracks remain unissued, with the partial exception of "Lili Marleen". With its massive success on the war front, specifically on the German language OSS MO radio station "Soldatensender", where it became the station's theme song,[25] the song was re-recorded in English and released, with the spelling "Lili Marlene", as a 10" single by Decca in 1945. Though other recordings of the song in German were performed by Dietrich, the original OSS recording of the track is presumed unissued.

Soundtrack Performances (1929 - 1978)[edit]

Marlene Dietrich in Blonde Venus (1932)

Many of Dietrich's performances of songs in her films[19] have been included in compilations of her music:[26]

  • "You're the Cream in my Coffee" (The Blue Angel Screen Test, 1929)
  • "Wer wird den weinen" (The Blue Angel Screen Test, 1929)
  • "Ich bin die fesche Lola" (Der blaue Engel, 1930)
  • "Nimm' Dich in acht vor blonden Frau’n" (Der blaue Engel, 1930)
  • "Kinder, heut' abend, da such ich mir was aus (Der blaue Engel, 1930)
  • "Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß auf Liebe eingestellt" (Der blaue Engel, 1930)
  • "Quand l'amour meurt" (Morocco, 1930)
  • "What Am I Bid for my Apple?" (Morocco, 1930)
  • "Blonde Women" (The Blue Angel, 1930)
  • "Lola" (The Blue Angel, 1930)
  • "This Evening, Children" (The Blue Angel, 1930)
  • "Falling In Love Again" (The Blue Angel, 1930)
  • "Hot Voodoo" (Blonde Venus, 1932)
  • "I Couldn’t Be Annoyed" (Blonde Venus, 1932)
  • "You Little-So-and-So" (Blonde Venus, 1932)
  • "Heidenröslein" (Song of Songs, 1933)
  • "Jonny" (Song of Songs, 1933)
  • "Three Sweethearts Have I" (The Devil is a Woman, 1935)
  • "Awake in a Dream" (Desire, 1936)
  • "Little Joe, The Wrangler" (Destry Rides Again, 1939)
  • "You've Got That Look" (Destry Rides Again, 1939)
  • "See What the Boys in the Backroom Will Have" (Destry Rides Again, 1939)
  • "I've Been In Love Before" (Seven Sinners, 1940)
  • "The Man's in the Navy" (Seven Sinners, 1940)
  • "Sweet Is the Blush of May" (The Flame of New Orleans, 1941)
  • "He Lied and I Listened" (Manpower, 1941)
  • "Strange Thing" (The Lady is Willing, 1942)
  • "Tell Me, Tell Me, Evening Star" (Kismet, 1944)
  • "Golden Earrings" (Golden Earrings, 1947)
  • "Illusions" (A Foreign Affair, 1948)
  • "Black Market" (A Foreign Affair, 1948)
  • "The Ruins of Berlin" (A Foreign Affair, 1948)
  • "La Vie en Rose" (Stage Fright, 1950)
  • "The Laziest Gal in Town (Stage Fright, 1950)
  • "Love is Lyrical" (Stage Fright, 1950)
  • "Get Away, Young Man" (Rancho Notorious, 1952)
  • "Gypsy Davey" (Rancho Notorious, 1952)
  • "Les Jeux Sonts Faits" (The Monte Carlo Story, 1957)
  • "Back Home Again in Indiana" (The Monte Carlo Story, 1957)
  • "I May Never Go Home Anymore" (Witness for the Prosecution, 1958)
  • "Just a Gigolo" (Just a Gigolo, 1978)

Selected songs introduced by Marlene Dietrich[edit]

  • 1930: "Falling In Love Again"
  • 1930: "Naughty Lola"
  • 1930: "Blonde Women"
  • 1932: "Hot Voodoo"
  • 1932: "You Little So and So"
  • 1936: "Awake in a Dream"
  • 1939: "See What the Boys in the Back Room Will Have"
  • 1939: "You've Got That Look"
  • 1948: "Illusions"
  • 1948: "Black Market"
  • 1953: "Look Me Over Closely"
  • 1962: "Cherche la Rose"
  • 1964: "In den Kasernen"

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bach, Steven (1992). Marlene Dietrich: Life and Legend. London: Harper Collins. p. 364. ISBN 0-00-217944-X. 
  2. ^ Bach, 1992. p 364.
  3. ^ Bach, 1992. p 525.
  4. ^ Bach, 1992. p 526.
  5. ^ Bach, 1992. p 176.
  6. ^ Bach, 1992. p 472.
  7. ^ a b c Bach, 1992. p 528.
  8. ^ Bach, 1992. p 522.
  9. ^ a b Bach, 1992. p 523.
  10. ^ a b c Beck, Heinz. "Compact Discs". Marlene Dietrich - Ihre Filme. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  11. ^ Setzepfandt, Christian. "Live Auftritte 1960 bis 1967". Marlene Dietrich Lieder. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  12. ^ Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin. "Old But New II" (PDF). Newsletter 67. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  13. ^ Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin. "Production / Co-Production Books". marlenedietrich.org. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  14. ^ Sudendorf, Werner (2005). "Lyrics and Labels". Sounds Like Marlene. Archived from the original on 2005-03-06. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  15. ^ Bach, 1992. p. 524.
  16. ^ Setzepfandt, Christian. "Studioaufnahmen 1951 bis 1959". Marlene Dietrich Lieder. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  17. ^ a b Bach, 1992. p 525 - 528.
  18. ^ a b O'Connor, Patrick (1991). The Amazing Blonde Woman: Dietrich's Own Style. London: Bloomsbury. p. 154. ISBN 0-7475-1264-7. 
  19. ^ a b c Sudendorf, Werner; deWerk, Jan (2005). "Song Chronology". Sounds Like Marlene. Archived from the original on January 16, 2005. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  20. ^ Manfred Weihermüller: Discographie der deutschen Kleinkunst. Vol. 1., p. 51 - 54. Bonn: Lotz 1991. ISBN 3-9802656-0-9
  21. ^ Puchstein, Uli. "Singles". Falling in Love Again. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  22. ^ Bach, 1992. p 521.
  23. ^ a b Beck, Heinz. "Records". Marlene Dietrich - Ihre Filme. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  24. ^ Sudendorf, Werner (2005). "Lyrics and Labels". Sounds Like Marlene. Archived from the original on 2005-03-06. Retrieved February 25, 2011. 
  25. ^ a b CIA.gov (2008-10-23). "A Look Back ... Marlene Dietrich: Singing For A Cause". Retrieved 2014-06-20. 
  26. ^ Bach, 1992. p528.

External links[edit]