Marlon Blackwell

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Marlon Blackwell
MarlonBlackwell BW.jpg
BornNovember 7, 1956 (age 62)
Fürstenfeldbruck, Germany
NationalityAmerican
Alma materAuburn University, Syracuse University
OccupationPrincipal/Owner
Spouse(s)Meryati Johari Blackwell (married 1994-present)
PracticeMarlon Blackwell Architects
ProjectsRuth Lilly Visitors Pavilion, Indianapolis Museum of Art

Museum Store at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

St. Nicholas Eastern Orthodox Church

Vol Walker Hall / Steven L. Anderson Design Center

Keenan TowerHouse

Shelby Farms Park
Websitemarlonblackwell.com

Marlon Blackwell (born November 7, 1956) is an American architect and university professor in Arkansas. A Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, Blackwell is the E. Fay Jones Chair in Architecture and a Distinguished Professor in the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He is founder and principal at Marlon Blackwell Architects, a design firm established in 2000 in Fayetteville. Working outside the architectural mainstream, his architecture is based in design strategies that celebrate vernaculars and that draw upon them, and that seek to transgress conventional boundaries for architecture.[1]

Early life and career[edit]

Marlon Blackwell was born November 7, 1956, in Fürstenfeldbruck, Germany. He grew up near Air Force bases in the Philippines, Alabama, Florida, Colorado, and Montana.[2] He received a Bachelor of Architecture from Auburn University and a Master of Architecture II from Syracuse University (in Florence, Italy).[1] During college, he spent five summers in the rural South as a Bible salesman for the Thomas Nelson Publishing Company.[2] After completing his undergraduate degree, he practiced in firms in Lafayette, Louisiana, and Boston, Massachusetts. Following his graduate degree, he was a visiting professor at Syracuse University.[2]

He has taught at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville since 1992.[1] He co-founded the University of Arkansas Mexico Summer Urban Studio at the Casa Luis Barragán in Mexico City and taught in the program for many years beginning in 1996. He served as head of the architecture department from 2009-2015.[1]

He authored the book An Architecture of the Ozarks: The Works of Marlon Blackwell (Princeton Architectural Press, 2006). This monograph of his design work features nine built residential and commercial projects and three residential prototypes. The book includes essays by Juhani Pallasmaa, Dan Hoffman and David Buege.[2]

In 1994, he married Meryati Johari. They live in Fayetteville with their two children. Meryati Johari Blackwell is an architect and principal at Marlon Blackwell Architects.[2]

In 2000, he founded Marlon Blackwell Architects (originally Marlon Blackwell Architect).[2]

Notable career achievements[edit]

Honors and awards[edit]

Blackwell is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the 2016 National Design Award for Architecture Design from Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.[3] In 2014, he was named a United States Artists Ford Fellow (in Architecture and Design).[4] In 2012, he received the Architecture Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.[5]

Blackwell was elected to the American Institute of Architects College of Fellows in 2009. In 1998, the Architectural League of New York selected him as an "Emerging Voice" in architecture.[2]

Thirteen projects by Blackwell's firm have been recognized with national awards by The American Institute of Architects (AIA), including the AIA Honor Awards for Vol Walker Hall/Steven L. Anderson Design Center at the University of Arkansas (2018), the Crystal Bridges Museum Store at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (2015), the Little Rock Creative Corridor (2014), St. Nicholas Eastern Orthodox Church (2013), and the Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (2012). He has won AIA Housing Awards for Graphic House (2016) and L-Stack House (2008).

The St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Springdale, Arkansas, received the 2011 World Architecture Festival, Best Civic and Community Building.[6][7] It also won the 2012 American Institute of Architects (AIA) National Small Project Award.

Other awards and distinctions include several American Architecture Awards from the Chicago Athenaeum for Harvey Pediatric Clinic (2017), University of Arkansas School of Architecture Addition and Renovation (2014), Fayetteville Montessori Elementary (2014), Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (2012), and St. Nicholas Orthodox Church (2011).

In addition, the Harvey Pediatric Clinic in Rogers, Arkansas, received the 2017 Healthcare Design Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Academy of Architecture for Health. The Gentry Public Library in Gentry, Arkansas, received the 2009 National AIA / ALA Library Design Award.

The University of Arkansas School of Architecture Addition and Renovation in Fayetteville, Arkansas, also received a 2016 American Architecture Prize (Educational Buildings, Platinum), a 2016 National AIA / CAE Educational Facility Design Award of Excellence, and the 2012 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Technology in Architectural Practice, Building Information Modeling Award for Exemplary Use of BIM in a Small Firm.

The Fayetteville Montessori Schools (Elementary and Primary) in Fayetteville, Arkansas, received a 2016 American Architecture Prize [Educational Buildings, Gold]. Fayetteville High School, Phase 1+2 in Fayetteville, Arkansas, received the 2016 National AIA / CAE Educational Facility Design Award of Merit.

The Little Rock Creative Corridor (with the University of Arkansas Community Design Center) in Little Rock, Arkansas, received the 2014 American Society of Landscape Architects Honor Award for Analysis and Planning.

The Moore Honeyhouse in Cashiers, North Carolina, received the 2003 AR+D Award from The Architectural Review.

His work was exhibited in "Building:Community" at the 2016 Venice Biennale in Venice, Italy, alongside the work of the University of Arkansas Community Design Center.

The Keenan TowerHouse, in Fayetteville, Arkansas, was featured on the cover of the February 2001 issue of Architectural Record.[8] The St. Nicholas Eastern Orthodox Church, in Springdale, Arkansas, was featured on the cover of the November 2011 issue of Architectural Record. [6][7]

His firm was named the 2011 Firm of the Year by Residential Architect magazine.[9] Blackwell was selected as an ID Forty: Undersung Heroes by The International Design Magazine in 2006.

Academia[edit]

Blackwell has taught at the University of Arkansas since 1992, and he has also held visiting teaching positions at several universities. During his tenure at the University of Arkansas, he was named by DesignIntelligence magazine as one of the "30 Most Admired Educators" for 2015. He has co-taught design studios with Peter Eisenman (1997 and 1998), Christopher Risher (2000), and Julie Snow (2003). Other visiting academic appointments have included the McDermott Visiting Professor at the University of Texas at Austin (2016), the George Baird Professor at Cornell University (2012), the Thomas Jefferson Professor at the University of Virginia (2011), the Elliel Saarinen Visiting Professor at the University of Michigan (2009), the Ivan Smith Distinguished Professor at the University of Florida (2009), the Paul Rudolph Visiting Professor at Auburn University (2008), the Cameron Visiting Professor at Middlebury College (2007), the Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor at Washington University in St. Louis (2003), and a visiting graduate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (2001 and 2002).

Major works[edit]

Residential[edit]

Graphic House, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2016)

L-Stack House, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2006)

Porchdog House Prototype, Biloxi, Mississippi (2009)

Arkansas House, Johnson, Arkansas (2004)

Keenan TowerHouse, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2000)

Commercial[edit]

Crystal Bridges Museum Store, Bentonville, Arkansas (2011)

Harvey Pediatric Clinic, Rogers, Arkansas (2016)

The Fulbright Building renovation, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2007)

Blessings Golf Course Clubhouse, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2005)

Srygley Office Building, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2004)

Institutional[edit]

Fayetteville High School (Arkansas) (2014)

Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion, Indianapolis Museum of Art (2010)

St. Nicholas Eastern Orthodox Church, Springdale, Arkansas (2010)

Gentry Public Library, Gentry, Arkansas (2008)

Northwest Arkansas Free Health Center, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2013)

All Saints Episcopal Church, Bentonville, Arkansas (in design development)

Montessori Elementary and Primary Schools, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2012, 2014)

Vol Walker Hall renovation / Steven L. Anderson Design Center addition, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2013)

The Lamplighter School Innovation Lab and Barn, Dallas, Texas (2017)

Urban[edit]

Creative Corridor (with University of Arkansas Community Design Center), Little Rock, Arkansas (2012)

Shelby Farms Park, Memphis, Tennessee (2016)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Marlon Blackwell University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Blackwell, Marlon (2006). An Architecture of the Ozarks: The Works of Marlon Blackwell. Princeton Architectural Press. pp. 176 pages. ISBN 156898488X.
  3. ^ "2016 National Design Award Winners". Cooper-Hewitt Museum. Retrieved 2017-07-23.
  4. ^ "USA Fellows". United States Artists. Retrieved 2017-09-07.
  5. ^ "Awards". American Academy of Arts and Letters. Retrieved 2017-09-07.
  6. ^ a b "St. Nicholas Eastern Orthodox Church". Architectural Record. Retrieved 2017-07-23.
  7. ^ a b "Marlon Blackwell Church Wins World Architecture Festival Award". Architectural Record. Retrieved 2017-09-07.
  8. ^ "Marlon Blackwell and Meryati Johari Blackwell". Architectural Record. Retrieved 2017-09-07.
  9. ^ Drueding, Meghan. "Top Firm: Marlon Blackwell Architect". Residential Architect. Retrieved 2017-09-07.

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Blackwell, Marlon. An Architecture of the Ozarks: The Works of Marlon Blackwell. Princeton Architectural Press (2006). 176 pages. ISBN 156898488X