Marple Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Marple Township
Township
Seventeenth-century Thomas Massey House on Lawrence Road
Seventeenth-century Thomas Massey House on Lawrence Road
Official seal of Marple Township
Seal
Location in Delaware County and the state of Pennsylvania.
Location in Delaware County and the state of Pennsylvania.
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Coordinates: 39°58′30″N 75°21′29″W / 39.97500°N 75.35806°W / 39.97500; -75.35806Coordinates: 39°58′30″N 75°21′29″W / 39.97500°N 75.35806°W / 39.97500; -75.35806
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Delaware
Area[1]
 • Total 10.52 sq mi (27.24 km2)
 • Land 10.20 sq mi (26.42 km2)
 • Water 0.31 sq mi (0.81 km2)
Elevation 361 ft (110 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 23,428
 • Estimate (2016)[2] 23,780
 • Density 2,330.92/sq mi (899.96/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 610
FIPS code 42-045-47616
Website www.marpletwp.com

Marple Township is a township in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. It contains the census designated place of Broomall. The population was 23,743 at 2015. ZIP codes include mainly 19008, but also partially 19064 and 19063. Township is run by Marple Township board of commissioners. President Joseph Rufo , Vice President Daniel Leefson,

History[edit]

1687HolmeMapProvRoad

The Delaware County area was first settled by Quakers who came to Pennsylvania by the Delaware River on September 29, 1683. The ship they used was called the Endeavor.[3] Marple Township was originally settled in 1684 and was recognized as a township in the same year.[4] The original spelling of the township was Marpool, however the spelling was changed to Marple in the Thomas Holme map of 1687. The Marpool spelling may have been an error.[5]

One of the settlers that arrived on the Endeavor was Thomas Massey. He obtained a 300-acre plantation in the township from William Penn. The house he built on the land is still preserved today, as well as some of its surrounding gardens.

In 1948 Marple Township got its first police station. Before, there was no local branch and no patrols of the police and only a county sheriff. Crimes were mostly settled between victims and perpetrators themselves.[6]

Marple became a first class township in 1961.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 10.5 square miles (27.2 km²), of which, 10.2 square miles (26.4 km²) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.8 km²) of it (2.95%) is water.

The community of Broomall is located in, but is not coterminous with, Marple Township—the township also includes part of the ZIP codes of Springfield and Media. Other villages include Larchmont (also in Newtown Township) and Lawrence Park.

Waterways in Marple Township include Crum Creek, Darby Creek, Hotland Run, Springton Lake and Trout Run.

Adjacent Municipalities[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,553
1940 2,170 39.7%
1950 4,779 120.2%
1960 19,722 312.7%
1970 25,040 27.0%
1980 23,642 −5.6%
1990 23,123 −2.2%
2000 23,737 2.7%
2010 23,428 −1.3%
Est. 2016 23,780 [2] 1.5%
[7]

As of the census[8] of 2010, there were 23,428 people, down slightly from 23,737 people in 2000. The racial makeup of the township was 89.6% White, 2.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 7.0% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population [2].

The 2000 census showed 8,623 households, and 6,415 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,326.1 people per square mile (898.5/km²). There were 8,797 housing units at an average density of 862.1/sq mi (333.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 92.60% White, 1.10% African American, 0.09% Native American, 5.51% Asian, 0.12% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.66% of the population.

There were 8,623 households, out of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.1% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.6% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the township the population was spread out, with 21.8% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 22.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $59,577, and the median income for a family was $71,829. Males had a median income of $47,062 versus $32,304 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,494. About 2.1% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.7% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Marple Township is governed by a Board of Commissioners made up of representatives from each of the township's wards which meets for regular sessions. The current commissioners, by ward, are Joseph Rufo(R-1), Jan Ceton(R-2), Robert Fortebouno(R-3), John Lucas(R-4), John Longacre(R-5), Michael Molinaro(R-6), and Daniel Leefson (R-7). Joseph Rufo currently serves as the board's president.

Politics[edit]

Presidential elections results
Year Republican Democratic
2012 53.5% 7,010 45.8% 6,008
2008 51.1% 6,920 48.0% 6,503

Marple generally leans to the right on the political spectrum. In the 2008 general elections, the township voted Republican for every office except for the General Assembly representative from the 166th district.

Along with Aston, Bethel, Chadds Ford, Concord, Edgmont, Middletown, Newtown, Springfield, and Tinicum, Marple was one of the ten Delaware County municipalities to vote Republican in the 2008 presidential election. The county as a whole voted Democratic.[9]

Education[edit]

At the secondary level, Marple Township is served by the Marple Newtown School District. In terms of higher education, Delaware County Community College, a public, two-year community college, is also located in Marple Township.

Transportation[edit]

Roads serving Marple Township include U.S. Route 1, which passes north-south through the southern part of the township along a freeway; Pennsylvania Route 3, which passes east-west through the northern part of the township along West Chester Pike; Pennsylvania Route 252, which passes north-south through the western part of the township along Newtown Street Road; Pennsylvania Route 320, which passes north-south through the township along Sproul Road; and Interstate 476, which passes north-south through the eastern part of the township along the Blue Route and has interchanges with US 1 and PA 3.[10]

SEPTA provides Suburban Bus service to Marple Township along Route 104, which follows West Chester Pike through the township on its route between West Chester and 69th Street Transportation Center in Upper Darby; Route 107, which runs from the Lawrence Park Shopping Center in the township to 69th Street Transportation Center via the Springfield Mall; Route 112, which follows Media Line Road and West Chester Pike through the township on its route between Delaware County Community College and the 69th Street Transportation Center; Route 115, which offers weekday service along Media Line Road and West Chester Pike through the township on its route between Delaware Community College and the Darby Transportation Center in Darby and the Philadelphia International Airport; Route 118, which follows Newtown Street Road through the township on its route between Newtown Square and the Chester Transportation Center in Chester; Route 120, which follows West Chester Pike through the township on its route between Cheyney University and the 69th Street Transportation Center; and Route 126, which runs from the Lawrence Park Shopping Center in the township to 69th Street Transportation Center via Manoa.[11]

Parks[edit]

Marple Township has a system of eleven parks.[12] They are maintained by the municipal government.

  • Broomall Fields - contains Little League Baseball fields for Marple Little League
  • Green Bank Farm - a large field with a walking and hiking trail
  • Highland Avenue Park - a small park with a roller hockey rink, basketball court, and tennis backboard
  • Kent Park - contains a playground area, a picnic area with barbecues, a gazebo with picnic benches, a stream, a paved walking trail, and tennis courts
  • Malin Road Tot Lot - same features as Kent Park
  • Marple Gardens - features a playground, picnic area with barbecues, basketball court, and a kids baseball / softball field which is used for Marple Tee-Ball
  • New Ardmore Avenue Park - playground, picnic area with barbecues, basketball court, large fields, and creek
  • Old Marple School Park - playground, picnic area, walking trail, and sledding hill
  • South Marple Little League - tennis courts, roller hockey rink, and snack bar
  • Thomas Fields - two Little League baseball fields, a Babe Ruth baseball field, two snack bars, a small playground, and trail to Kent Park
  • Veteran's Memorial Park - large playground, walking trail, large field, entertainment gazebo, restrooms, and soda machines

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 13, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  3. ^ Neal, Aaron. "Thomas Massey House". ThomasMasseyHouse.org. Retrieved 19 March 2012. 
  4. ^ Lockhart, Keith. "Delaware County History". Delaware County (PA) History. Retrieved 19 March 2012. 
  5. ^ Ashmeade, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. p. 579. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  6. ^ Marple Township Police Department: Brief Department History
  7. ^ http://www.dvrpc.org/data/databull/rdb/db82/appedixa.xls
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ Delaware County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2015. Retrieved January 25, 2016. 
  11. ^ SEPTA Official Transit & Street Map Suburban (PDF) (Map). SEPTA. Retrieved May 2, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-09-18. Retrieved 2011-07-20. 

External links[edit]