Marseilleviridae

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Marseilleviridae
Virus classification
Group: Group I (dsDNA)
Family: Marseilleviridae
Genera

Marseilleviridae is a family of double stranded DNA viruses. Amoeba serve as natural hosts. There are currently four species in this family, divided among 1 genera.[1][2] It is a member of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses clade.

Taxonomy[edit]

Group: dsDNA

[2]

Related Viruses[edit]

Additional species have since been recognized.[3] The first member of this family recognized has been named Acanthamoeba polyphaga marseillevirus. A second member is Acanthamoeba castellanii lausannevirus. Two additional viruses have been isolated but have yet to be named. Another member of this family has been isolated from blood donors.[4] An isolate from insects—Insectomime virus—has also been reported.[5]

The viruses appear to fall into at least 3 lineages: (1) Marseillevirus and Cannes8virus (2) Insectomime and Tunisvirus and (3) Lausannevirus. A sixth potential member of this family—Melbournevirus—appears to be related to the Marseillevirus/Cannes8virus clade.[6]

A seventh virus—Brazilian Marseillevirus—has been reported.[7] This virus appears to belong to a fourth lineage of virus in this family.

Another virus—Tokyovirus—has also been reported.[8]

Structure[edit]

Viruses in Marseilleviridae have icosahedral geometries. The diameter is around 250 nm. Genomes are circular, around 372kb in length. The genome has 457 open reading frames.[1]

Genus Structure Symmetry Capsid Genomic Arrangement Genomic Segmentation
Unassigned Head-Tail T=16 Non-Enveloped Linear Monopartite
Marseillevirus Icosahedral Circular

Life Cycle[edit]

Dna templated transcription is the method of transcription. Amoeba serve as the natural host.[1]

Genus Host Details Tissue Tropism Entry Details Release Details Replication Site Assembly Site Transmission
Marseillevirus Amoeba None Fusion Lysis Cytoplasm Cytoplasm Diffusion in Water

History[edit]

One of the first members of this family was described in 2009.[9] Other members described around then (2007) and since then have been documented.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 12 August 2015. 
  2. ^ a b ICTV. "Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release". Retrieved 12 August 2015. 
  3. ^ Colson P, Pagnier I, Yoosuf N, Fournous G, La Scola B, Raoult D (2012) "Marseilleviridae", a new family of giant viruses infecting amoebae. Arch Virol
  4. ^ Popgeorgiev N, Boyer M, Fancello L, Monteil S, Robert C, Rivet R, Nappez C, Azza S, Chiaroni J, Raoult D, Desnues C (2013) Giant blood Marseillevirus recovered from asymptomatic blood donors. J Infect Dis
  5. ^ Boughalmi M, Pagnier I, Aherfi S, Colson P, Raoult D, La Scola B. First isolation of a Marseillevirus in the Diptera Syrphidae Eristalis tenax. Intervirology 56(6):386–394 doi:10.1159/000354560
  6. ^ Doutre G, Philippe N, Abergel C, Claverie JM (2014) Genome analysis of the first Marseilleviridae representative from Australia indicates that most of its genes contribute to the virus fitness. J Virol pii: JVI.02414-14
  7. ^ Dornas FP, Assis FL, Aherfi S, Arantes T, Abrahão JS, Colson P, La Scola B (2016) A Brazilian Marseillevirus is the founding Member of a lineage in family Marseilleviridae. Viruses 8(3) pii: E76. doi: 10.3390/v8030076
  8. ^ Takemura M (2016) Draft genome sequence of Tokyovirus, a member of the Family Marseilleviridae isolated from the Arakawa River of Tokyo, Japan. Genome Announc 9:4(3). pii: e00429–16. doi: 10.1128/genomeA.00429-16
  9. ^ Boyer M, Yutin N, Pagnier I, Barrassi L, Fournous G, Espinosa L, Robert C, Azza S, Sun S, Rossmann MG, Suzan-Monti M, La Scola B, Koonin EV, Raoult D. (2009) Giant Marseillevirus highlights the role of amoebae as a melting pot in emergence of chimeric microorganisms. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 106:21848–21853. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0911354106. PubMed PMID 20007369
  10. ^ Aherfi S, La Scola B, Pagnier I, Raoult D, Colson P. (2014) The expanding family Marseilleviridae. Virology. pii: S0042-6822(14)00320-00321. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2014.07.014. PubMed PMID 25104553

External links[edit]