Martha Osamor, Baroness Osamor

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Martha Osamor, Baroness Osamor, is a Nigerian-British politician, community activist and civil rights campaigner.

Early life and career[edit]

Born Martha Otito Osantor in Delta State, Nigeria, Osamor moved to the UK in 1963 to join her husband who was then studying in London. Osamor and her husband settled in Tottenham, where they had four children. Her husband died unexpectedly in 1975.

Politics[edit]

Osamor was a co-founder of the United Black Women's Action Group (UBWAG). From 1977 to 1997 Osamor worked at the Tottenham Law Centre (now called the Harringey Law Centre) and during this time became part of the Broadwater Farm Youth Association Mothers' Project on the nearby Broadwater Farm housing estate.[1]

From 1986 to 1990 she served as a Labour Councillor representing the Bruce Grove Ward in the London Borough of Haringey.[2]

Following the Broadwater Farm riot Osamor and Dolly Kiffin organised the "first Civil Rights Demonstration ever held in Britain" on 3 October 1987 and produced a Manifesto of the movement for civil rights and justice.[3] She became a founding member of the Broadwater Farm Defence Campaign.[4]

Osamor was nominated by some branches within the Vauxhall Constituency Labour Party in the selection for a candidate at the by-election in 1989, but was not shortlisted by the Labour Party National Executive Committee. Kate Hoey was selected as the eventual Labour candidate.

She was nominated for a life peerage by Jeremy Corbyn in May 2018 and on 26 November 2018 the Queen conferred upon her the title of Baroness Osamor, of Tottenham in the London Borough of Haringey and of Asaba in the Republic of Nigeria.[5][6][7]

Personal life[edit]

Lady Osamor is the mother of Labour member of Parliament Kate Osamor.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Papers of Martha Osamor". Black Cultural Archives Online Catalogue. Retrieved 2018-06-16.
  2. ^ Aminu, Adedamola (26 April 2018). "Nigerian-British Politicians in United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland: A Book of Profiles". Grosvenor House Publishing – via Google Books.
  3. ^ "Summary of oral history interview with Martha Osamor". Black Cultural Archives Online Catalogue. Black Cultural Archives. Retrieved 16 June 2018.
  4. ^ Aminu, Adedamola (2018). Nigerian British Politicians in United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland: A book of profiles. London: Leading Management Publications. ISBN 9781999965006.
  5. ^ "No. 62483". The London Gazette. 29 November 2018. p. 21785.
  6. ^ "Queen confers Peerages: 18 May 2018". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 19 May 2018.
  7. ^ Sabbagh, Dan; Perkins, Anne (18 May 2018). "May names nine new Tory peers to bolster party after Brexit defeats". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 May 2018.
  8. ^ "Martha Osamor: unsung hero of Britain's black struggle - Institute of Race Relations". www.irr.org.uk. Retrieved 19 May 2018.