Martha Scanlan Klima

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Martha Scanlan Klima
Delegate Maryland District 9A
In office
January 1983 – January 8, 2003
Constituency Baltimore County, Maryland
Personal details
Born (1938-12-03) December 3, 1938 (age 78)
Baltimore, Maryland
Political party Republican

Martha S. Klima (born December 3, 1938) was first elected in 1982 to represent District 9, which covers a portion of Baltimore County, Maryland, USA. She unsuccessfully ran for the State Senate in 2002. She was defeated by Jim Brochin.[1]

Background[edit]

Klima served in the Maryland House of Delegates for 20 years. First elected in 1982 and sworn in in 1983, she served on many committees, including: the Constitutional and Administrative Law Committee from 1983 until 1986, the Appropriations Committee from 1987 until 2003, the oversight committee on personnel from 1993 until 2003, the Joint Budget and Audit Committee from 1991 until 1994, the Special Joint Committee on Pensions from 1993 until 2003 and the Special Joint Committee on Group Homes from 1995 until 1997.

She was the Deputy Minority Whip from 1995 until 2002. She was also a member of the Joint Committee on Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review from 1995 until 2003, the Joint Committee on Welfare Reform from 1996 until 2003 and the Spending Affordability Committee from 1998 until 2003. She was the Vice-President of the Women Legislators of Maryland[2] in 1988. She is a member of the National Conference of State Legislators.[3] Finally, she was the chair of the Telecommunications and Information Technology Task Force for the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).[4]

Education[edit]

Klima graduated with her associate degree from Stevenson University in Stevenson, Maryland.

Career[edit]

Klima's primary job early in life was a homemaker. However, she was also involved in politics early in life. She is a past secretary of the Central Maryland Health Systems Agency. She was elected as a delegate to the Republican Party National Convention in 1984, which nominated Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush.

Additionally, Klima was a member of the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce, once serving as chair of the membership relations committee. She is a past member and governing trustee of the Council on Economic Education in Maryland.[5] She was a board member for the Center for Prevention of Child Abuse of Maryland, and vice-chair of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center[6] from 1986 until 1991.

Klima has won numerous awards and received recognition during her long career, including being appointed an honorary life member of the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers. She was once received the Woman of the Year Award from the Towsontowne Business and Professional Women's Club in 1988. She was awarded Outstanding Legislative Member by ALEC in 1994.[4] She also received the Legislative Award from the Baltimore County Commission on Disabilities[7] in 1994. She also received the Public Service Award from the Baltimore Association for Retarded Citizens[8] in 1994 and finally, the Legislator of the Year award from ALEC in 2001.

Since 2003, she has been on the Maryland Parole Commission.

Election results[edit]

  • 2002 Race for Maryland State Senate – District 42[9]
Voters to choose two:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Jim Brochin, Dem. 22,709   51%    Won
Martha S. Klima, Rep. 21,781   48.9%    Lost
Other Write-Ins 45   0.1%    Lost
  • 1998 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 9A[10]
Voters to choose two:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Martha S. Klima, Rep. 19,190   40%    Won
A. Wade Kach, Rep. 18,382   38%    Won
Stephen C. Kirsch, Dem. 10,584   22%    Lost
  • 1994 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 9B[11]
Voters to choose two:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Martha S. Klima, Rep. 19,927   38%    Won
A. Wade Kach, Rep. 18,734   36%    Won
Shelley Buckingham, Dem. 7,829   15%    Lost
Raymond A. Huber, Dem. 5,823   11%    Lost
  • 1990 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 9[12]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Martha S. Klima, Rep. 15,461   19%    Won
Gerry L. Brewster, Dem. 14,876   19%    Won
John J. Bishop, Rep. 14,589   18%    Won
Michael Gisriel, Dem. 14,428   18%    Lost
Charles Culbertson, Dem. 10,522   13%    Lost
James Holechek, Rep. 9,855   12%    Lost
  • 1986 Race for Maryland House of Delegates – District 9[13]
Voters to choose three:
Name Votes Percent Outcome
Martha S. Klima, Rep. 16,082   19%    Won
Michael Gisriel, Dem. 14,329   17%    Won
John J. Bishop, Rep. 14,004   17%    Won
Patrick E. Carter, Rep. 13,003   16%    Lost
Jack R. Sturgill Jr., Dem. 12,819   16%    Lost
William R. Richardson Jr., Dem. 12,291   15%    Lost

References and notes[edit]

  1. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections (2002-12-02). "Maryland Elections". Elections.state.md.us. Retrieved 2014-06-04. 
  2. ^ "Maryland General Assembly Caucuses - Women Legislators of Maryland". Msa.md.gov. Retrieved 2014-06-04. 
  3. ^ "Legislative News, Studies and Analysis | National Conference of State Legislatures". Ncsl.org. Retrieved 2014-06-04. 
  4. ^ a b "American Legislative Exchange Council - Limited Government · Free Markets · Federalism". Alec.org. Retrieved 2014-06-04. 
  5. ^ "Maryland Council On Economic Education". Econed.org. Retrieved 2014-06-04. 
  6. ^ "Greater Baltimore Medical Center (GBMC) - Baltimore, Maryland". GBMC. 2006-09-30. Retrieved 2014-06-04. 
  7. ^ http://www.co.ba.md.us/Agencies/community/disabilities/index.html
  8. ^ "The Arc Baltimore - For people with intellectual and developmental disabilities". Baltimorearc.org. Retrieved 2014-06-04. 
  9. ^ "State Senate Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Nov. 14, 2007
  10. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Nov. 14, 2007
  11. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Nov. 14, 2007
  12. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Nov. 14, 2007
  13. ^ "House of Delegates Results". Maryland State Board of Elections.  Retrieved on Nov. 14, 2007

External links[edit]