Martin Albrow

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Martin Albrow (born 1937) is a British sociologist, noted for his works on globalization, the theory of the global age and global civil society. He was appointed in 1963 as the first full time sociologist at Reading University, and subsequently worked at University College Cardiff, where he was Head of Department, and at Roehampton University. He has also held visiting or guest positions at Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, the London School of Economics, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, the Beijing Foreign Studies University and the University of Bonn.

He was the founder editor of the International Sociological Association's journal, International Sociology, and wrote 'The Global Age: State and Society beyond Modernity', awarded the 1997 European Amalfi Prize, which argued against the view that globalization was an inevitable one way process, and that a new age had supplanted both the modern and postmodern ages.

He was President of the British Sociological Association from 1985 to 1987 and editor-in-chief of its Sociology from 1981 to 1984. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. He lives in London with his wife, Sue Owen.

His books include: 'Bureaucracy', London, Pall Mall, 1970; 'Max Weber's Construction of Social Theory', London, Macmillan, 1990; 'The Global Age: State and Society beyond Modernity', Cambridge, Polity 1996; 'Do Organizations Have Feelings?' London and New York, Routledge, 1997; Sociology:The Basics London and New York, Routledge, 1999; and 'Global Age Essays on Social and Cultural Change', Frankfurt am Main, Klosterman, 2014.