Martin Armiger

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Martin Armiger
Birth name John Martin Armiger
Born (1949-06-10) 10 June 1949 (age 66)
Hitchin, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Origin Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Genres Rock and roll, pop
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, guitarist, record producer, film/TV composer
Years active 1970–present
Labels Mushroom, White, Powderworks/RCA, ABC, Regular, Normal/Citadel, WEA
Associated acts High Rise Bombers, The Bleeding Hearts, The Sports, Stephen Cummings Band
Website martinarmiger.com

John Martin Armiger (born 10 June 1949, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom) is an Australian musician, record producer and film/TV composer. He was singer-songwriter and guitarist with Melbourne-based rock band, The Sports from August 1978 to late 1981, which had Top 30 hits on the Kent Music Report Singles Chart with, "Don't Throw Stones" (1979), "Strangers on a Train" (1980) and "How Come" (1981); and Top 20 albums with, Don't Throw Stones (No. 9, 1979), Suddenly (No. 13, 1980) and Sondra (1981).

Armiger was musical director for Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) TV series, Sweet and Sour, in 1984 and was record producer on the related soundtrack albums as well as performing and song writing. At the Australian Film Institute Awards of 1986 he shared an accolade for Best Original Music Score with William Motzing for their work on Young Einstein. In 1995 his work for TV series, Cody (1994–95), won the Australasian Performing Right Association Award for Most Performed Television Theme. As of 2004, Armiger was Head of Screen Composition at the Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS). In 2006 his portrait by John R Walker was a finalist at the Archibald Prize.

Early years[edit]

John Martin Armiger[1][2] was born on 10 June 1949 in Hitchin, Hertfordshire. His father, Jack Armiger, played double bass, piano and sang in local bands; his mother also played piano and sang. At the age of eight he gave up on his violin lessons, turned away from his mother's taste in classical music and his father's favourites of Peggy Lee or Perry Como – he had discovered Buddy Holly's "Brown Eyed Handsome Man".[3] The family migrated to Australia in 1965 and lived in Elizabeth, South Australia. Armiger studied at Flinders University in Adelaide where he completed his Bachelor of Arts (Honours) course in 1974.[4] His younger brothers, Keith, Andrew, and Michael Armiger, are also musicians and have been members of The Immigrants (1978–1980)[5] in Elizabeth, 10000 Guitars (1985–1987)[5] in Melbourne, and Armiger Brothers in Sydney, as well as having separate musical careers. Their youngest brother, Chris Armiger (born 1965), joined the Armiger Brothers, which have recorded with Martin, who also produced their material.

By the early 1970s Armiger had decided on a career in music, he began practising to improve his guitar skills. During 1972, as a student, he was a composer for a short film, Drac.[6][7] It was directed by David Stocker as a 1973 Masters Student Film for the Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS).[7] In 1975 Armiger moved to Melbourne and started with local bands. He soon joined The Toads on lead guitar and backing vocals with Andrew Bell on bass guitar; Randy Bulpin on lead guitar; Jane Clifton on lead vocals; Eric Gradman on violin; Jenny Keath on backing vocals; Buzz Leeson, and Eddie van Rosendaal on drums.[6][8] Also in 1975 Armiger composed music for A Night in Rio, a stage musical at Melbourne's Pram Factory.[9] He co-composed music for Pure Shit (aka Pure S) with Red Symons (a member of Skyhooks), a feature film directed by Bert Deling.[6][9][10] Armiger wrote the title track and theme,[11] and, as a member of Toads, performed on the soundtrack.[6][10]

In 1976 he was a founding member of pub rockers, The Bleeding Hearts, on guitar and lead vocals.[12] Other members were Gradman on violin and vocals; Rick Grossman on bass guitar; Keith Shadwick on saxophone and backing vocals; Huk Treloar on drums; Laurie Tunnicliffe on bass guitar; Geoff Warner and Chris Worrall on guitar.[8][12] The band appeared at local venues, including The Kingston Hotel, and The Tiger Lounge (Hotel), where Armiger played a white Fender Stratocaster. In August 1977 the group broke up but left enough material for a posthumous album, What Happened!, which appeared in the following year on Missing Link Records.[12]

In 1977 he briefly joined Flying Tackle and was then a member of The High Rise Bombers, another pub-rock group, from 1977 to 1978.[8][12] The line-up included Armiger (guitar, vocals, songwriter), Lee Cass (bass guitar), Chris Dyson (guitar), Sally Ford (saxophone, songwriter; ex-Flying Tackle), Paul Kelly (vocals, guitar, songwriter), John Lloyd (drums) and Shadwick (saxophone).[8][13] Dyson was replaced by Chris Langman (guitar, vocals) in early 1978.[8] In August the group dissolved as Armiger left for The Sports, Ford left for The Kevins, and Kelly formed Paul Kelly and the Dots with Langman and Lloyd.[13] High Rise Bombers had recorded two tracks "She's Got It" and "Domestic Criminal" which eventually appeared on the 1981 compilation album, The Melbourne Club, by various artists on Missing Link Records. "Domestic Criminal" was written by Armiger.[14]

The Sports[edit]

Main article: The Sports

The Sports had formed in Melbourne in 1976 and included, Stephen Cummings on vocals, Ed Bates on guitar, Robert Glover on bass guitar, Paul Hitchins on drums, and Jim Niven on piano.[13] Andrew Pendlebury joined on guitar in August 1977, and in August the following year Bates was replaced by Armiger.[13] According to music journalist, Ian McFarlane, Cummings had ousted Bates in favour of Armiger who had a "more commercial outlook".[13] Luis Feliu of The Canberra Times described Bates: "[he] shows an authentic feel for the early strains of rock and roll", whereas Armiger "brings with him a more electric sound".[15]

The Sports had chart success in the late 1970s and early 1980s with Top 30 hits on the Kent Music Report Singles Chart with, "Don't Throw Stones" (1979), "Strangers on a Train" (1980) and "How Come" (1981);[16] and Top 20 albums with, Don't Throw Stones (No. 9, 1979), Suddenly (No. 13, 1980) and Sondra (1981).[16] For Don't Throw Stones Feliu noted that Armiger "has now established himself as a dominating sound and songwriter with the band", specifically his "songs sees the Sports getting into a sort of heavier, Skyhooks type approach".[17] "Strangers on a Train" was written by Armiger,[1] he also co-wrote album tracks with Cummings.[18]

In October 2010 Don't Throw Stones, was listed in the book, 100 Best Australian Albums.[19] The authors, John O'Donnell, Toby Creswell and Craig Mathieson, described how Armiger had affected the group's sound "it is immediately clear the extra dimension his presence brings to the band – his songs – and harmony vocals greatly increase [the group's] soul pop quotient".[19]

Armiger praised Suddenly, Feliu quoted him "[its] still quite smooth, but it's less slick. There are a few groove songs, a couple almost reggaeish. When we did Don't Throw Stones we were just getting into things like reggae. This time it was much easier to play things like that".[20] He described working with Cameron Allan, their producer on Sondra, to Susan Moore of The Australian Women's Weekly: "we knew we could badger him to get what we wanted, if need be. We had more time to get the sound we wanted".[21] The Sports broke up late in 1981 and Cummings went on to a solo career, while Armiger turned to record producing and session work.[13]

Record producer and music composer[edit]

While a member of The Sports, Armiger produced "Beatnik Twist" as a single for Johnny Topper in 1979.[8] As a session musician, by November 1980, he supplied lead guitar for Marc Hunter's solo album, Big City Talk.[22] In 1981 he produced three tracks, "Promise not to Tell", "Lowdown" and "Want You Back", on former High Rise Bombers band mates, Paul Kelly and the Dots' debut album, Talk, released on Mushroom Records in March.[23][24] The other tracks were produced by Joe Camilleri, except one track produced by Trevor Lucas.[23][24] After The Sports had disbanded, in August 1982 Armiger produced an extended play, Club of Rome, and a single, "Ululation (Here It Comes Again)" (September 1983), for The Kevins which included Sally Ford, another former band mate.[25][26] In the early 1980s, Armiger moved to New South Wales, he continued to produce records, and expanded his composition and performance of music for films and TV.

From 2 July 1984 Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) broadcast a 20-episode, weekly pop music, drama TV series, Sweet and Sour. Armiger was musical director for the series, he provided backing vocals, lead guitar, bass guitar, keyboards, drums and lyrics.[27] He also produced the two soundtrack albums, Sweet & Sour – TV Soundtrack and Sweet & Sour Volume Two,[27] and three singles, "Sweet and Sour" (which peaked at No. 13 on the Kent Music Report Singles Chart),[16] "Glam to Wham" and "No Focus".[27] Also in that year he joined Stephen Cummings Band on guitar and vocals; and in August he produced Cummings' debut solo album, Senso, released on Regular Records, with the related single, "Gymnasium", which peaked at No. 27.[8][16] Neil Lade of The Canberra Times described the single "[its] quite a dismal and derivative little number that easily falls into the category of throw-away music" while the rest of the album's "overall feeling is of soft soul and a gentle mood prevails".[28] In May 1985 Armiger won Producer of the Year at the annual Countdown Music and Video Awards of 1984.[29]

In 1987 Armiger composed music for another ABC TV series, Stringer, and in April 1988, he produced the related album, Always Got the Blues, released by its singers, Kate Ceberano and Wendy Matthews, which included his song writing effort, "Stringer".[8] The album reached No. 4 on the national chart.[16] Armiger composed the score, with William Motzing, for Young Einstein (December 1988), a film by Yahoo Serious.[30][31] They had won the Australian Film Institute Award of 1986 for Best Original Music Score for their work.[30][31][nb 1]

Armiger was composer for Come in Spinner, an ABC TV series in 1989, and produced the soundtrack of the same title in 1990, by Vince Jones and Grace Knight, which peaked at No. 4 on the ARIA Album Charts.[8][32] Armiger provided the inspiration for the Screen Music Awards established by the Australian Guild of Screen Composers (AGSC) in 1992.[33] He was subsequently AGSC president for seven years.[33] In 1993 he produced Seven Deadly Sins, another soundtrack, for the ABC TV drama series of the same name.[8] His former band mate, Kelly, provided vocals on the soundtrack together with Vika Bull, Deborah Conway, and Renée Geyer.[34] The album provided a single, "He Can't Decide".[34] Armiger co-wrote various tracks, "He Can't Decide", "Imagine the World" and "Maybe This Time" (all with Kelly), and "Don't Break It I Say" (with Kelly, Conway and Geyer).[35]

He wrote the theme of Cody (1994–95), a six-part TV drama series for Seven Network.[36] At the APRA Awards of 1995 he won Most Performed Television Theme for his composition.[37][38] The Sports reformed for the Mushroom 25 Live anniversary concert on 14 November 1998, at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG),[13] but Armiger was unable to perform due to a previously broken leg turning gangrenous.[39] For the gig the group used Ashley Naylor of Even on guitar.[39] During September 2000 Armiger was hospitalised by an infection, in the following January he recalled his experience in an article, "Waiting for Life and Death'", for the The Sydney Morning Herald.[40]

As of 2004 Armiger was Head of Screen Composition at the Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS).[41] At AFTRS he coordinated and taught the Graduate Diploma in Screen Composition as a specialist course for selected students.[42] He composed the news theme for the ABC which has been in use on ABC1 since early 2005.[2][43] In 2006 Flinders University recognised his contributions to the music industry as a recipient of their Distinguished Alumni Awards.[4] Also that year his portrait, by John R Walker, was a finalist at the Archibald Prize.[44]

In October 2009 Armiger was called as an expert witness for a Federal Court hearing on a plagiarism claim against Colin Hay and Ron Strykert as writers of the 1981 Men at Work hit single "Down Under",[45] which peaked at No. 1 in Australia,[16] United Kingdom,[46] and United States.[47] The flute riff was claimed to be from "Kookaburra Sits in the Old Gum Tree".[45] Armiger stated that the riff had the same melody as "Kookaburra" but gave a different impression in "Down Under" and that it was debatable whether it was the song's hook.[45]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Armiger, Martin (October 1995). "Crazier Than the Average Band". The Independent Monthly 7 (4): 77. 
  • Armiger, Martin (2000). The Waiters. Melbourne: Text Publishing. ISBN 978-1-876485-57-3. 
  • Armiger, Martin (13 January 2001). "Waiting for Life and Death". The Sydney Morning Herald (Fairfax Media). 
  • Armiger, Martin (2006). "Pool of echoes". Meanjin (Melbourne) 65 (3): 66–73. ISSN 0025-6293. Screen composer Martin Armiger recalls his musical past and his musical influences. Paper in: On Rock 'n' Roll 

Discography[edit]

Main article: The Sports discography | Stephen Cummings Band discography

The High Rise Bombers

  • "She's Got It", "Domestic Criminal" on The Melbourne Club – various artists (1981, Missing Link Records)

Record producer[edit]

Armiger credited as producer or co-producer:[8]

Filmography[edit]

Armiger credited as music composer or co-composer:[41]

  • Drac – (1972)[7]
  • Pure Shit (aka Pure S) – (1976)
  • Belau – (1983)
  • White Man's Legend – (1984)
  • Displaced Persons – (1984)
  • Sweet and Sour – (1984)
  • The Lizard King – (1985)
  • The Empty Beach – (1985)
  • Dancing Daze – (1986)
  • Cyclone Tracy – (1986)
  • Two Friends – (1986)
  • I Own the Racecourse – (1986)
  • The Challenge – (1986)
  • I've Come About the Suicide – (1987)
  • Perhaps Love – (1987)
  • Relative Merits – (1987)
  • Cane Toads – (1988)
  • Police Rescue (1988)
  • Young Einstein – (1988)
  • Stringer – (1988)
  • The Last Resort – (1988)
  • Sweetie – (1989)
  • The Rainbow Warrior Conspiracy – (1989)
  • The Body Surfers – (1989)
  • The Crossing – (1990)
  • Ring of Scorpio – (1990)
  • Wonderful World of Dogs – (1990)
  • Come in Spinner – (1990)
  • Waiting – (1991)
  • Flowers and the Wide Sea – (1991)
  • Children of the Dragon – (1991)
  • The Fremantle Conspiracy – (1992)
  • The Other Side of Paradise – (1993)
  • Nice Guys Finish Last – (1993)
  • Seven Deadly Sins ("Greed", "Envy" episodes) – (1993)
  • Pram Factory – (1994)[48]
  • Cody – (1994–1996)
    • Cody: Bad Love, Cody: The Tipoff , Cody: The Wrong Stuff, Cody: The Burn Out, Cody: Fall from Grace
  • Party Girls – (1995)
  • Where Angels Fear to Tread – (1996)
  • Wild Ones – (1997)
  • Thank God He Met Lizzie aka The Wedding Party – (1997)
  • The Great Stumble Forward – (1998)
  • Ketchup – (1998)
  • Two Girls & a Baby (1998)
  • David Carradine's Martial Arts Adventure – (1999)
  • House Gang – (1999)
  • Fetch – (1999)
  • Powderburn – (1999)
  • Hard Knox – (2001)
  • The Secret Life of Us – (2001)
  • Hildegarde aka Hildegarde: A Duck Down Under – (2001)
  • Marking Time – (2003)
  • The Surgeon – (2006)
  • Clubland aka Introducing the Dwights – (2007)

Awards[edit]

Australasian Performing Right Association Awards
Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) recognises excellence by composers and songwriters with the APRA Awards presented annually since 1982.[37][38]

Year Recipient / Nominated work Award Result
1995 Cody Most Performed Television Theme Won
Flowers and the Wide Sea Nominated

APRA-AGSC Screen Music Awards
These awards are presented annually since 2002 by APRA in conjunction with Australian Guild of Screen Composers (AGSC) for television and films scores and soundtracks.[49] Separate AGSC Awards were inaugurated in 1992 upon the inspiration of Armiger.[33][50]

Year Recipient / Nominated work Award Result
2004 Marking Time Best Music for a Mini-Series or Telemovie Nominated

Australian Film Institute Awards
Australian Film Institute (AFI) recognises excellence in film work with the Australian Film Institute Awards (AFI Awards) presented annually since 1958.[30]

Year Recipient / Nominated work Award Result
1986 Young Einstein[nb 1] Best Original Music Score Won

Australian Recording Industry Association Awards
Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) recognises excellence in recorded musical work with the ARIA Music Awards (ARIAs) presented annually since 1987.[51]

Year Recipient / Nominated work Award Result
1995 Fornicon Best Original Soundtrack / Cast / Show Recording Nominated

Countdown Awards
Countdown was an Australian pop music TV series on national broadcaster ABC-TV from 1974–1987, it presented music awards from 1979–1987, initially in conjunction with magazine TV Week but then independently.[52] The Countdown Music and Video Awards were succeeded by the ARIA Awards.[29][52][53]

Year Recipient / Nominated work Award Result
1984 Martin Armiger Best Producer[29] Won

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The award win was shared with fellow composer William Motzing.[30] They won their award in 1986 for the unreleased version of Young Einstein.[30] The film appeared in Australian cinemas in December 1988. Serious had delayed its release due to dissatisfaction with the earlier version of the film, and a legal dispute with the original distribution company.[31]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b "'Strangers on a Train' APRA Works Search". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 23 October 2009. 
  2. ^ a b "ACE Title Search". The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). Retrieved 7 May 2014.  Note: User may have to search for information: e.g. at Titles: Cyclone Tracy; or at Writers: John Martin Armiger
  3. ^ Armiger, Martin (2006). "Pool of echoes". Meanjin (Melbourne) 65 (3): 66–73. ISSN 0025-6293. 
  4. ^ a b "Distinguished Alumni Awards". Alumni Office, Flinders University. Retrieved 31 October 2009. 
  5. ^ a b Holmgren, Magnus. "Michael Armiger". Passagen.se. Australian Rock Database (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Pure S Music Credits" (PDF). OzMovies.com.au. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c "Drac Short Film". Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS). Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Holmgren, Magnus. "Martin Armiger". Passagen.se. Australian Rock Database (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "Songwriters – Score Composers – Martin Armiger". Mushroom Music Publishing. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 7 May 2014. 
  10. ^ a b "Pure S – Cast, Crew, Director and Awards". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  11. ^ "'Pure Shit' at APRA Works Search". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  12. ^ a b c d McFarlane, 'The Bleeding Hearts' entry at the Wayback Machine (archived August 3, 2004). Archived from the original on 3 August 2004. Retrieved 8 May 2014.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g McFarlane, 'The Sports' entry at the Wayback Machine (archived August 6, 2004). Archived from the original on 6 August 2004. Retrieved 8 May 2014.
  14. ^ "'Domestic Criminal' APRA Works Search". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  15. ^ Feliu, Luis (15 September 1978). "Full-on and no Slack". The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) (National Library of Australia). p. 33. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  16. ^ a b c d e f Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.  NOTE: Used for Australian Singles and Albums charting from 1970 until ARIA created their own charts in mid-1988.
  17. ^ Feliu, Luis (23 February 1979). "Rock Music: Acceptable Change by The Sports". The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) (National Library of Australia). p. 7 Section: TV Radio Guide. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  18. ^ "'All the Girls' APRA Works Search". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 8 May 2014.  Note: User may have to click on 'Search again' and enter details e.g. at 'Performer:' Sports
  19. ^ a b O'Donnell, John; Creswell, Toby; Mathieson, Craig (October 2010). 100 Best Australian Albums. Prahran, Vic: Hardie Grant Books. ISBN 978-1-74066-955-9. 
  20. ^ Feliu, Luis (14 March 1980). "Slickness, Who Needs It?". The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) (National Library of Australia). p. 25. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  21. ^ Moore, Susan (10 June 1981). "Moore on Pop". The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) (National Library of Australia). p. 123 Section: TV and Entertainment World. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  22. ^ Moore, Susan (19 November 1980). "Moore on Pop". The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) (National Library of Australia). p. 70 Supplement: Free Your TV Magazine. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  23. ^ a b Holmgren, Magnus. "Paul Kelly". Passagen.se. Australian Rock Database (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  24. ^ a b Blanda, Eva (2003). "The Recordings of Paul Kelly with bands". Other People's Houses. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  25. ^ Holmgren, Magnus. "The Kevins". Passagen.se. Australian Rock Database (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  26. ^ McFarlane, 'The Kevins' entry at the Wayback Machine (archived September 30, 2004). Archived from the original on 30 September 2004. Retrieved 8 May 2014.
  27. ^ a b c Dennis W. Nicholson (ed.). "SWEET AND SOUR". Australian Soundtracks. Retrieved 25 October 2009. 
  28. ^ Lade, Neil (17 September 1984). "Rock Music: Labour of Love". The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) (National Library of Australia). p. 17. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  29. ^ a b c "Countdown Archives - 1985 - 25/05/1985". baseportal.com. Retrieved 30 October 2009. 
  30. ^ a b c d e "Australian Film Institute Feature Awards 1976–2008" (PDF). Australian Film Institute (AFI). p. 12. Retrieved 30 October 2009. 
  31. ^ a b c Information on Young Einstein production and release:
    • Hawker, Philippa (January 1989). "Start Laughing". Cinema Papers: 11–12. 
    • Hawker, Philippa (1993). "Young Einstein". In Murray, Scott. Australian Film 1978-1992. Oxford Uni Press. p. 261. ISBN 0-19553-584-7. 
  32. ^ "Vince Jones & Grace Knight - Come in Spinner". australian-charts.com. Retrieved 30 October 2009. 
  33. ^ a b c "2008 Screen Awards: Josh Pyke to perform!". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). 28 October 2008. Retrieved 31 October 2009. 
  34. ^ a b Holmgren, Magnus. "Seven Deadly Sins". Passagen.se. Australian Rock Database (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  35. ^ Zygier, Willy; Conway, Deborah (23 August 1993). "Seven Deadly Sins Soundtrack (1993)". Deborah Conway Official Website. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  36. ^ "Telemovies and Miniseries". Australian Television Information Archive (Tony Zuk). Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  37. ^ a b "1995 Winners". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 30 October 2009. 
  38. ^ a b "Nominations - 1995". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 31 October 2009. 
  39. ^ a b Scatena, Dino (15 July 1999). "What a Bummer". The Daily Telegraph (News Corp Australia). Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  40. ^ Armiger, Martin (13 January 2001). "Waiting for Life and Death". The Sydney Morning Herald (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 10 May 2014. 
  41. ^ a b "AFTRS: Staff: Martin Armiger: Head of Screen Composition". Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS). Archived from the original on 12 September 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2014. 
  42. ^ Atherton, Michael (2003). "Educating the Screen Composer in Australia" (PDF). Sounds Australia (Australian Music Centre) (61): 2, 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 November 2003. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  43. ^ "A History of the ABC News Themes". BBC. Retrieved 26 October 2009. 
  44. ^ "John R Walker: Martin Armiger :: Archibald Prize 2006". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  45. ^ a b c "Down Under flute riff 'unmistakably' from Kookaburra". news.com.au (News Limited). 29 October 2009. Retrieved 31 October 2009. 
  46. ^ "Men at Work UK chart history". The Official Charts Company. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  47. ^ "Business as Usual Men at Work Awards". Allmusic. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  48. ^ Armiger, Martin; Grieve, Anna; Manché, James; Carlson, Rey; Film Australia (1994), Pram factory, Film Australia. National Library of Australia, retrieved 9 May 2014 
  49. ^ "2004 APRA-AGSC Screen Music Awards". Australian Television Information Archive (Tony Zuk). Retrieved 31 October 2009. 
  50. ^ "Screen Music Awards : History". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 31 October 2009. 
  51. ^ "Winners by Year – 27th ARIA Awards 2013 : Search Results 'Martin Armiger'". Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Retrieved 10 May 2014. 
  52. ^ a b "TV Week "King of Pop" Awards". Milesago. Retrieved 30 October 2009. 
  53. ^ Angus Cameron, ed. (1985). "Countdown Award Winner". The Australian Almanac. North Ryde, NSW: Angus & Robertson. pp. 234–235. ISBN 0-207-15108-3. 

External links[edit]