Martin County, North Carolina

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Martin County, North Carolina
Williamston, NC - old Martin County Courthouse.JPG
Map of North Carolina highlighting Martin County
Location in the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1774
Named for Josiah Martin
Seat Williamston
Largest town Williamston
Area
 • Total 462 sq mi (1,197 km2)
 • Land 461 sq mi (1,194 km2)
 • Water 0.3 sq mi (1 km2), 0.06%
Population
 • (2010) 24,505
 • Density 53/sq mi (20/km2)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Eastern: UTC−5/−4
Website www.martincountyncgov.com

Martin County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 24,505.[1] Its county seat is Williamston.[2]

History[edit]

The county was formed in 1774 from the southeastern part of Halifax County and the western part of Tyrrell County. It was named for Josiah Martin, the last royal governor of North Carolina (1771–75).[3] Whereas Dobbs County and Tryon County, named for Martin's predecessors Arthur Dobbs and William Tryon, were abolished after American independence, Martin County was neither abolished nor renamed, a fact which has been attributed to the popularity of Alexander Martin, twice governor of the state (1782–84, 1789–92).

The Martin County Courthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 462 square miles (1,200 km2), of which 461 square miles (1,190 km2) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) (0.06%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
17906,010
18005,629−6.3%
18105,9876.4%
18206,3205.6%
18308,53935.1%
18407,637−10.6%
18508,3078.8%
186010,19522.7%
18709,647−5.4%
188013,14036.2%
189015,22115.8%
190015,3831.1%
191017,79715.7%
192020,82817.0%
193023,40012.3%
194026,11111.6%
195027,9387.0%
196027,139−2.9%
197024,730−8.9%
198025,9484.9%
199025,078−3.4%
200025,5932.1%
201024,505−4.3%
Est. 201623,172[6]−5.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790–1960[8] 1900–1990[9]
1990–2000[10] 2010–2013[1]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 25,593 people, 10,020 households, and 7,194 families residing in the county. The population density was 56 people per square mile (21/km²). There were 10,930 housing units at an average density of 24 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 52.54% White, 45.37% Black or African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.90% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. 2.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 10,020 households out of which 31.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.30% were married couples living together, 17.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.20% were non-families. 25.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.50% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 25.00% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 86.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,793, and the median income for a family was $35,428. Males had a median income of $29,818 versus $19,167 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,102. About 16.30% of families and 20.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.50% of those under age 18 and 25.70% of those age 65 or over.

Law and government[edit]

Martin County is a member of the Mid-East Commission regional council of governments.

Politics[edit]

Martin County has tended to vote in line with the rest of the country in presidential elections. In 2008, Barack Obama won the county with 52.2% of the vote. This was very similar to his national figure of 52.91%.[citation needed]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 49.3% 5,897 48.9% 5,846 1.9% 221
2012 47.4% 5,995 52.0% 6,583 0.6% 74
2008 47.5% 5,957 52.1% 6,539 0.4% 45
2004 51.0% 5,334 48.8% 5,102 0.2% 16
2000 47.2% 4,420 52.6% 4,929 0.2% 17
1996 42.0% 3,590 52.6% 4,500 5.4% 462
1992 36.9% 2,958 50.8% 4,069 12.3% 989
1988 46.6% 3,149 53.3% 3,598 0.1% 9
1984 52.3% 4,266 47.5% 3,870 0.2% 17
1980 34.6% 2,564 64.1% 4,750 1.3% 98
1976 29.8% 1,931 69.8% 4,518 0.4% 28
1972 68.8% 4,188 30.2% 1,840 1.0% 63
1968 15.0% 1,221 38.2% 3,118 46.8% 3,818
1964 23.9% 1,511 76.1% 4,821
1960 11.2% 737 88.8% 5,826
1956 7.3% 449 92.7% 5,730
1952 7.0% 415 93.0% 5,493
1948 3.4% 163 95.5% 4,636 1.1% 54
1944 2.9% 133 97.1% 4,408
1940 2.2% 106 97.8% 4,628
1936 2.4% 111 97.6% 4,477
1932 2.4% 94 97.4% 3,781 0.2% 8
1928 12.7% 411 87.3% 2,818
1924 9.7% 216 89.9% 1,999 0.4% 9
1920 17.2% 530 82.9% 2,561
1916 16.0% 281 84.0% 1,472
1912 15.1% 229 82.6% 1,251 2.3% 34

Education[edit]

The primary and secondary public school functions are performed by Martin County Schools, a district covering the entire county. Martin Community College is located in Williamston.

Communities[edit]

Map of Martin County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

Towns[edit]

Townships[edit]

  • Bear Grass
  • Cross Roads
  • Goose Nest
  • Griffins
  • Hamilton
  • Jamesville
  • Poplar Point
  • Robersonville
  • Williams
  • Williamston

See also[edit]

Coordinates: 35°50′N 77°06′W / 35.84°N 77.10°W / 35.84; -77.10

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 201.
  4. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-16.

External links[edit]