Martin Fayulu

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Martin Fayulu
Martin Fayulu Par Ezra Sierra © 2018 cropped.jpg
Member of the National Assembly
In office
2011–2017
Personal details
Born (1956-11-21) 21 November 1956 (age 63)
Léopoldville, Belgian Congo (now Kinshasa, Congo-Kinshasa)
EducationParis 12 Val de Marne University
Institut Superieur de Gestion
European University of America

Martin Madidi Fayulu (born 21 November 1956) is a businessman[1] and lawmaker from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He is the leader of the Engagement for Citizenship and Development party. On 11 November 2018, he was chosen by seven opposition leaders to be their joint presidential candidate in the 2018 Democratic Republic of the Congo general election. However, within 24 hours, Félix Antoine Tshisekedi Tshilombo, the eventual winner of the 2018 presidential election, and Vital Kamerhe, the other oppositional candidate, rescinded their endorsement of his candidacy and formed their own pact with Tshisekedi as candidate.[2][3][4]

Biography[edit]

Fayulu in 2015

Born in Kinshasa, Martin Fayulu is a former ExxonMobil executive, having worked with the oil company from 1984 until 2003. He served as the company's director-general in Ethiopia as his last post. His involvement in politics began in 1991 when he attended the Sovereign National Conference, which brought together delegates from different regions and organizations to campaign for a multi-party democracy. Mobutu Sese Seko, the authoritarian President of Zaire (as the Democratic Republic of the Congo was then called), allowed the conference to take place but ignored it. Fayulu did not enter politics full time until 2006. In the 2006 and 2011 general elections, he was elected as an MP to the National Assembly. In 2009 he established the Commitment for Citizenship and Development party, which has three MPs, including Fayulu.[5]

Félix Tshisekedi was declared the winner of the December 2018 election, despite election observers' belief that Fayulu had won the vote, in what was seen by Fayulu and his supporters as a deal between Tshisekedi and outgoing President Joseph Kabila.[6][7] Fayulu challenged the result in the DRC's Constitutional Court, which has been criticised for being staffed primarily by Kabila appointees, and thus by late January 2019 the court ruled that Tshisekedi was the rightful winner and he was sworn in as President.[8][9] He has continued to remain active in politics since the election, continuing to claim that he was the rightful winner.[10] In late July 2019, he met in Lubumbashi with members of the opposition, including former Katanga Province governor Moïse Katumbi, former Prime Minister Adolphe Muzito, and a representative of former rebel leader Jean-Pierre Bemba. They discussed the future of the opposition and democracy in the DRC.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vanessa Mayamuene (11 November 2018). "Martin Fayulu Madidi" (in French). Geopolis Hebdo. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  2. ^ "DR Congo opposition picks joint presidential candidate". Yahoo News. AFP. 11 November 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  3. ^ "Congo opposition picks Martin Fayulu as its presidential candidate". Reuters. 11 November 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  4. ^ "Congo's Tshisekedi and Kamerhe form presidential pact". Reuters News. Reuters. 23 November 2018. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  5. ^ DR Congo election: Martin Fayulu's ambition to be president. BBC. 19 December 2018.
  6. ^ The Latest: Opposition candidate Fayulu denounces results. Associated Press. Published 10 January 2019.
  7. ^ Runner-up in Congo's presidential election dismisses results as an 'electoral coup'. Reuters. Published 10 January 2019.
  8. ^ The Latest: Congo runner-up: Don't recognize Tshisekedi. ABC News, 19 January 2019
  9. ^ DR Congo top court upholds Tshisekedi presidential election win. France24, 19 January 2019
  10. ^ Congo president and predecessor agree on division of cabinet posts. Reuters, 26 July 2019
  11. ^ DR Congo: Opposition leaders meet in Lubumbashi. Africa News, 31 July 2019

External links[edit]