Martin Harley

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Martin Harley
OccupationJockey
Major racing wins
Major races
King's Stand Stakes (2015)
Irish 1,000 Guineas (2012)
Prix de l'Abbaye (2015)
Prix Royal Oak (2013)
Significant horses
Goldream, Samitar, Sheikhzayedroad, Tac De Boistron

Martin Harley is a Group 1 winning Irish jockey.

Career[edit]

Harley had spells as stable jockey for Mick Channon and Marco Botti, before turning freelance. His first Group 1 victory was for Channon on Samitar in the Irish 1,000 Guineas in May 2012. For Botti, he won the Prix Royal Oak the following year on Tac De Boistron, which helped him to a yearly prize money total of over £1 million for the first time.

His breakthrough triumph was the 2015 King's Stand Stakes at Royal Ascot, on the Robert Cowell-trained Goldream. He won by a short head. He won the Prix de l'Abbaye with another narrow victory on the same horse later in the season.[1]

In March 2014, in a minor race at Lingfield, he clipped the heels of a rival on Red Art, and was catapulted into the ground, at almost 40mph. He suffered a broken neck and several broken ribs in an injury that was considered potentially career-ending.[1]

In 2016, he built a successful partnership with stayer Sheikhzayedroad, winning three group races, including the Doncaster Cup and British Champions Long Distance Cup.

Statistics[edit]

Flat wins in Great Britain by year[2]

Year Wins Runs Strike Rate Total Earnings
2007 0 1 0
2008 1 9 11 £4,533
2009 0 1 0
2010 1 4 25 £10,101
2011 67 530 13 £277,986
2012 74 656 11 £723,350
2013 103 788 13 £1,109,828
2014 79 579 14 £923,531
2015 83 685 12 £1,221,202
2016 76 602 13 £1,289,534
2017[a] 57 492 12 £835,623

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ to 25 Oct

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Stars: Jockeys - Martin Harley". QIPCO British Champions Series. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  2. ^ "Profile: Jockey - Martin Harley - Stats". Racing Post. Retrieved 25 October 2017.

Major wins[edit]

United Kingdom Great Britain

Republic of Ireland Great Britain

France France

References[edit]