Martin Paul Eve

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Martin Paul Eve

MA, PhD
Photograph of Martin Paul Eve
Born (1986-05-26) May 26, 1986 (age 33)
NationalityBritish
OccupationLecturer, Writer
Known forCo-founder of the Open Library of Humanities
TitleProfessor of Literature, Technology and Publishing
Spouse(s)Helen Eve
RelativesRich Hinks
AwardsPhilip Leverhulme Prize, KU Leuven Honorary Medal in the Humanities and Social Sciences, N. Katherine Hayles Award
Academic background
Alma materQueen Mary, University of London; University of Sussex
ThesisHostility or Tolerance? Philosophy, Polyphony and the Works of Thomas Pynchon (2013)
Doctoral advisorPeter Boxall
Academic work
DisciplineLiterary Studies, Digital Humanities, Library and Information Science
Sub-disciplineContemporary American fiction
InstitutionsUniversity of Lincoln, Birkbeck, University of London
Main interestsThomas Pynchon; metafiction; digital humanities Open access policy
Websitehttps://eve.gd/

Martin Paul Eve (born 1986) is a British academic and writer. He is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck College, University of London and Visiting Professor of Digital Humanities at Sheffield Hallam University.[1] He is known for his work on contemporary literary metafiction, computational approaches to the study of literature, and open-access policy. Together with Dr Caroline Edwards, he is co-founder of the Open Library of Humanities (OLH).

Eve was the recipient of the 2019 Philip Leverhulme Prize, the 2018 KU Leuven Honorary Medal in the Humanities and Social Sciences,[2] a joint recipient of the Electronic Literature Organization's N. Katherine Hayles 2018 Prize for his chapter in The Bloomsbury Handbook of Electronic Literature,[3] and in 2017 was a shortlisted finalist for the Guardian's Most Inspiring Leader in Higher Education award.[4]

Academic Work[edit]

Eve's academic work focuses on contemporary American and British fiction, textual scholarship, and digital approaches to the study of literature. He is especially well known for his work on David Mitchell and for uncovering and documenting the multiple textual editions of Cloud Atlas.[5][6][7][8] Eve's more recent work has turned to quantitative and computational approaches to the study of contemporary fiction, using approaches that have been praised for their rigour but simultaneously criticized for the relative paucity of critical return.[9]

Open-Access Policy Work[edit]

Eve is known for and significantly involved in UK and international policy work on open access. In 2013, for instance, he gave oral and written evidence to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom's Department for Business, Innovation and Skills's Select Committee Inquiry into Open Access.[10] Eve is also a member of the Universities UK Open Access Monographs Working Group[11] and a Plan S Ambassador.[12] Eve is also a co-investigator on the £2.2m Research England funded Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM), which aims to effect a transition of the UK's academic book publications to openly accessible modes.[13]

Eve is a founder and CEO of the Open Library of Humanities, a platform with an economic model that avoids author- or funder- facing charges and that is based on his previous theoretical writings.[14][15] Originally funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation,[16], the platform is funded by a consortium of over 200 libraries and publishes 25 journals.[17][18] In addition, the OLH funds journals from Liverpool University Press and the University of Wales Press to publish their titles without article processing charges.[19][20]


Publications[edit]

  • Eve, Martin Paul (2014). Pynchon and Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Foucault and Adorno. Basingstoke; New York: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-1137405494.
  • ——— (2014). Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future. Cambridge: Cambridge University.
  • ——— (2016). Password. Object Lessons. London: Bloomsbury. ISBN 978-1501314872.
  • ——— (2016). Literature Against Criticism: University English & Contemporary Fiction in Conflict. Cambridge: Open Book. ISBN 978-1783742738.
  • ——— (2019). Close Reading with Computers: Textual Scholarship, Computational Formalism, and David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas. Stanford: Stanford University. ISBN 978-1503609365.

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Staff Page for Martin Paul Eve, Birkbeck, University of London". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  2. ^ a b "KU Leuven Honorary Medal in the Humanities and Social Sciences". Ku Leuven. Retrieved 16 August 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Announcing the Winners of the 2018 ELO Prize". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Higher education's most inspiring leader shortlist 2017". The Guardian. March 2017. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  5. ^ Eve, Martin Paul (2019). Close Reading with Computers: Textual Scholarship, Computational Formalism, and David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas. Stanford: Stanford University. ISBN 978-1503609365.
  6. ^ Eve, Martin Paul (2016). ""You have to keep track of your changes": The Version Variants and Publishing History of David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas". Open Library of Humanities. 2 (2): 1. doi:10.16995/olh.82.
  7. ^ Schelstraete, Inge (16 August 2016). "David Mitchell minimaliseert verschillen tussen edities van 'Cloud Atlas'". De Standaard. Belgium.
  8. ^ Flood, Alison (10 August 2016). "Cloud Atlas 'astonishingly different' in US and UK editions, study finds". The Guardian. UK. |access-date=24 August 2019}}
  9. ^ Da, Nan Z. (2019). "The Computational Case against Computational Literary Studies". Critical Inquiry. 45 (3): 601–639. doi:10.1086/702594.
  10. ^ Eve, Martin Paul (2014). Inquiry into Open Access. Fifth report of session 2013-2014. Hansard. p. Ev20-Ev27, Ev68-Ev69.
  11. ^ "UUK Open Access Monographs Working Group". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  12. ^ "Plan S Ambassadors". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  13. ^ "Birkbeck To Play Leading Role In Project To Transform Open Access Academic Publishing". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  14. ^ Eve, Martin Paul (2014). Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future. Cambridge: Cambridge University.
  15. ^ Eve, Martin Paul (2014). "All That Glisters: Investigating Collective Funding Mechanisms for Gold Open Access in Humanities Disciplines". Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 2 (3): 1131. doi:10.7710/2162-3309.1131.
  16. ^ The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. "Grant: Open Library of Humanities". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  17. ^ "Open Library of Humanities Supporters". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  18. ^ "Open Library of Humanities Journals". Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  19. ^ Liverpool University Press. "Open Library of Humanities and Liverpool University Press to flip another subscription journal to OA".
  20. ^ University of Wales Press. "Open Library of Humanities and University of Wales Press partner to convert journal to full open access".
  21. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prize 2019". The Leverhulme Trust. Retrieved 21 October 2019.

External links[edit]