Martin Shaw (bishop)

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The Right Reverend
Martin Shaw
Bishop Emeritus of Argyll and The Isles
Church Scottish Episcopal Church
Diocese Diocese of Argyll and The Isles
In office 2004–2009
Orders
Ordination 1968 (deacon)
1969 (priest)
Consecration 8 June 2004
Personal details
Birth name Alexander Martin Shaw
Born (1944-09-22) 22 September 1944 (age 73)
Denomination Anglicanism
Spouse Elspeth
Children Two
Alma mater King's College, London
University of Glasgow

Alexander Martin Shaw (called Martin; born 22 September 1944) is a retired Anglican bishop who served in the Scottish Episcopal Church. He was the Bishop of Argyll and The Isles from 2004 to 2009.

Early life and education[edit]

Shaw studied theology at King's College London, and was awarded the Associateship of King's College (AKC) in 1967.[1] He trained for ordination at Warminster Theological College from 1967 to 1968. He studied at the University of Glasgow, from which he was awarded a Certificate in Social Psychology in 1970.[2]

Ordained ministry[edit]

Shaw was ordained to the Anglican ministry as a deacon in 1968 and a priest in 1969.[2] His first pastoral appointment was as curate at St Oswald's Church, Glasgow (1968–1970), then as a curate at Old Saint Paul's, Edinburgh (1970–1975).[2] He served as the chaplain to King's College, Cambridge (1975–1977) and the principal of the Institute of Christian Studies, All Saints, Margaret Street, London (1977–1978).[2] He was then Rector of Dunoon (1978–1981) and the succentor at Exeter Cathedral in 1981.[2] His last appointment before being ordained to the episcopate was as precentor and a residentiary canon of St Edmundsbury Cathedral.[3]

Episcopal ministry[edit]

Shaw was elected Bishop of Argyll and The Isles at a meeting of the electoral synod in Oban in March 2004.[3] He was consecrated and installed at a service on 8 June 2004 at St John's Episcopal Cathedral, Oban.[3] After serving as bishop of the Diocese of Argyll and The Isles for five years, he retired in September 2009.[4]

Since 2010, Shaw had been an honorary assistant bishop in the Diocese of Exeter.[1] On 11 February 2017, fourteen retired bishops signed an open letter to the then-serving bishops of the Church of England. In an unprecedented move, they expressed their opposition to the House of Bishops' report to General Synod on sexuality, which recommended no change to the Church's canons or practises around sexuality.[5] By 13 February, a serving bishop (Alan Wilson, Bishop of Buckingham) and nine further retired bishops — including Shaw — had added their signatures;[6] on 15 February, the report was rejected by synod.[7]

Personal life[edit]

Shaw is married to Elspeth. Together, they have two children; Madeleine and Ben.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Alexander Martin Shaw"Paid subscription required. Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 15 January 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Bertie, David M. (2000). Scottish Episcopal Clergy, 1689–2000. Edinburgh: T & T Clark. p. 433. ISBN 0567087468. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Bishop Murray welcomes new Episcopal Bishop of Argyll and The Isles". Scottish Catholic Media Office. 2 April 2004. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Episcopal Retirements". Scottish Episcopal Church. 4 March 2009. Retrieved 6 July 2013. 
  5. ^ Retired Bishops' Letter — The Letter (Accessed 11 February 2017; the fourteen bishops were David Atkinson, Michael Doe, Tim Ellis, David Gillett, John Gladwin, Laurie Green, Richard Harries, Stephen Lowe, Stephen Platten, John Pritchard, Peter Selby, Tim Stevens, Martin Wharton, and Williamson.)
  6. ^ Retired Bishops' Letter — New Signatures (Accessed 17 February 2017; the nine bishops were Gordon Bates, Ian Brackley, John Davies, Peter Maurice, David Rossdale, John Saxbee, Shaw, Oliver Simon, and David Stancliffe.
  7. ^ The Grauniad — Church of England in turmoil as synod rejects report on same-sex relationships (Accessed 17 February 2017)
Scottish Episcopal Church titles
Preceded by
Douglas Cameron
Bishop of Argyll and The Isles
2004–2009
Succeeded by
Kevin Pearson