Marvel Cinematic Universe: Phase One

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Phase One
Marvel Cinematic Universe - Phase One.jpg
Packaging for the "Marvel Cinematic Universe – Phase One: Avengers Assembled"
Blu-ray box set
Produced by
Based onCharacters published
by Marvel Comics
StarringSee below
Production
company
Distributed by
Release date
2008–2012
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
BudgetTotal (6 films):
$1 billion
Box officeTotal (6 films):
$3.811 billion

Phase One of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) is a series of American superhero films produced by Marvel Studios based on characters that appear in publications by Marvel Comics. The phase began in 2008 with the release of Iron Man and concluded in 2012 with the release of Marvel's The Avengers. Kevin Feige produced every film in the phase, alongside Avi Arad for Iron Man and The Incredible Hulk, with Gale Anne Hurd also producing The Incredible Hulk. The six films of the phase grossed over $3.811 billion at the global box office along with generally positive critical and public reception.

Samuel L. Jackson appeared the most in the phase, starring or making cameo appearances in five of the Phase One films, while The Avengers actors – Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, and Jeremy Renner – signed contracts to star in numerous films. Marvel Studios created three short films for their Marvel One-Shots program to expand the MCU, while each of the feature films received tie-in or adaption comic books and tie-in video games. Phase One, along with Phase Two and Phase Three, make up The Infinity Saga.

Development[edit]

Marvel gained the film rights to Iron Man in November 2005 from New Line Cinema. In February 2006, Marvel announced that they had gained the film rights to Hulk from Universal,[1] in exchange for letting Universal own the distribution rights to The Incredible Hulk and the right of first refusal to pick up the distribution rights to any future Marvel Studios-produced Hulk films.[2] In April 2006, Thor was announced to be a Marvel Studios production.[3] Soon after, Lions Gate Entertainment dropped the Black Widow project it had been working on since 2004, giving the rights back to Marvel.[4]

Kevin Feige was named President of Production at Marvel Studios in March 2007 as Iron Man began filming.[5]

On October 18, 2010, Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures acquired the distribution rights for The Avengers from Paramount Pictures[6] with Paramount's logo and credit remaining on the films[7] and on July 2, 2013, Disney purchased the distribution rights to Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger from Paramount.[8][9]

Films[edit]

Film[10] U.S. release date Director Screenwriter(s) Producer(s)
Iron Man May 2, 2008 Jon Favreau[11] Mark Fergus & Hawk Ostby and Art Marcum & Matt Holloway[11][12] Avi Arad and Kevin Feige
The Incredible Hulk June 13, 2008 Louis Leterrier[13] Zak Penn[14] Avi Arad, Gale Anne Hurd
and Kevin Feige
Iron Man 2 May 7, 2010 Jon Favreau[15] Justin Theroux[16] Kevin Feige
Thor May 6, 2011 Kenneth Branagh[17] Ashley Edward Miller & Zack Stentz and Don Payne[18]
Captain America: The First Avenger July 22, 2011 Joe Johnston[19] Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely[20]
Marvel's The Avengers May 4, 2012 Joss Whedon[21]

Iron Man (2008)[edit]

Avi Arad, who helped secure early financing,[22] produced Iron Man and The Incredible Hulk.

Billionaire industrialist Tony Stark builds himself a suit of armor after he is taken captive by a terrorist organization. Free from his captors, he decides to upgrade and don his armor in order to hunt down weapons that were sold under the table.[23]

In April 2006, Marvel hired Jon Favreau to direct Iron Man,[11] with the writing teams of Art Marcum and Matt Holloway and Mark Fergus and Hawk Ostby writing competing scripts.[11][24] Favreau consolidated both into one script, which was then polished by John August.[12] Robert Downey, Jr. was cast in the title role in September 2006, after growing out a goatee and working out to convince the filmmakers he was right for the part.[25] Principal photography began on March 12, 2007,[26] with the first few weeks spent on Stark's captivity in Afghanistan,[27] which was filmed in Inyo County, California.[28] Production also occurred on the former Hughes Company soundstages in Playa Vista, Los Angeles, California,[29] with additional filming at Edwards Air Force Base[30] and Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada.[31] Iron Man premiered at the Greater Union theater in George Street, Sydney, on April 14, 2008,[32] and was released internationally on April 30, and in the United States on May 2.[33][34]

The film ends with a post-credits scene featuring Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury, who approaches Stark regarding the "Avenger Initiative". Favreau said that he included the scene as "a little tip of the hat for the fans...a way to sort of tee up The Avengers." Jackson was only on set for a day, with a skeleton crew to avoid the news of his cameo leaking.[35] Captain America's shield is also visible in the background of a scene; it was added by an ILM artist as a joke, and Favreau decided to leave it in the film.[36]

The Incredible Hulk (2008)[edit]

After being exposed to gamma radiation that causes him to transform into the monstrous Hulk, scientist Bruce Banner goes on the run and isolates himself from his love, Betty Ross. Hunted by the military, Banner seeks to cure himself and prevent his condition from being weaponized.[37]

In January 2006,[38] Marvel reclaimed the film rights for the Hulk character from Universal Pictures after Universal failed to meet a deadline to develop a sequel to director Ang Lee's 2003 film Hulk.[39] Universal retained distribution rights for future Hulk films.[39] Instead of moving forward with a sequel, Marvel hired Louis Leterrier to direct The Incredible Hulk, a reboot.[13] Leterrier initially turned down the job out of respect for Lee, but later reconsidered and signed on.[13] The script was written by Zak Penn, who drafted a treatment for the 2003 film.[40] In April 2006, Edward Norton entered negotiations to portray Bruce Banner and rewrite Penn's script,[41] although Penn received sole credit for the screenplay.[14] Production began on July 9, 2007 and filming primarily took place in Toronto,[42] with additional filming in New York City and Rio de Janeiro.[43] The film premiered at the Gibson Amphitheatre on June 8, 2008, and was released on June 13.[44][45]

The film takes place simultaneously with the events of Iron Man 2 and Thor,[46] the former of which is set six months after the events of Iron Man.[47] Downey briefly reprised his role from Iron Man as Tony Stark in a cameo appearance at the end of the film. Downey said that the filmmakers "were just cross-pollinating our superheroes. It happens to be a scene where I basically approach [actor William Hurt's character General Ross], and we may be considering going into some sort of limited partnership together. The great thing is he—and I don't want to give too much away—but he's in disrepair at the time I find him. It was really fun seeing him play this really powerful character who's half in the bag."[48] In addition, Captain America is briefly seen frozen in ice in an alternate opening of the film, included in the DVD release.[49]

Iron Man 2 (2010)[edit]

Jon Favreau, the director of Iron Man and Iron Man 2, helped establish the shared universe concept with his inclusion of Samuel L. Jackson in a post-credits scene of the first film.

After Tony Stark reveals himself to be Iron Man, the U.S. government demands he hand over his technology. Meanwhile, a rival industrialist and a Russian scientist conspire to use his own technology against him.[50]

Immediately following the successful release of Iron Man in May 2008, Marvel Studios announced it was developing a sequel, Iron Man 2.[51] Favreau returned as director[15] and Justin Theroux was hired to write the screenplay, which would be based on an original story by Favreau and Downey.[16] In October 2008, Downey signed a new four-picture deal, that retroactively included the first film, to reprise his role and Don Cheadle was hired to replace Terrence Howard as James Rhodes.[52][53] Jackson signed on to reprise his role as Nick Fury from the Iron Man post-credits sequence in up to nine films,[54] and Scarlett Johansson was cast as the Black Widow, as part of a multi-film commitment.[55] Principal photography began April 6, 2009,[56] at the Pasadena Masonic Temple in Pasadena, California.[57] The majority of filming took place at Raleigh Studios in Manhattan Beach, California.[58] Other locations included Edwards Air Force Base,[59] Monaco,[60] and the Sepulveda Dam.[58] Iron Man 2 premiered at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles, California on April 26, 2010,[61] and was released internationally between April 28 and May 7 before releasing in the United States on May 7.[62]

The film is set six months after the events of Iron Man,[47] and takes place simultaneously with the events of The Incredible Hulk and Thor.[46] The filmmakers continued to refer to other Marvel films by again including Captain America's shield. Favreau explained, "We introduced Captain America's shield briefly in one shot in the last film. So now it really was in his room, so we had to figure out how to deal with the reality that the shield was in his workshop."[36] A scene toward the end of Iron Man 2 in a S.H.I.E.L.D. safe house contains several Easter eggs, ranging from footage from The Incredible Hulk displayed on a monitor to pointers on a map indicating several locales related to other Marvel films, including one pointing toward a region of Africa in reference to the Black Panther.[63] A young Peter Parker appears as the child wearing an Iron Man mask whom Stark saves from a drone; the appearance was confirmed in June 2017 by Spider-Man actor Tom Holland, Kevin Feige and Spider-Man: Homecoming director Jon Watts.[64][65] The film's post-credits scene shows the discovery of Thor's hammer in a crater.[66]

Thor (2011)[edit]

Thor, crown prince of Asgard, is banished to Earth and stripped of his powers after he reignites a dormant war. As his brother, Loki, plots to take the throne for himself, Thor must prove himself worthy and reclaim his hammer Mjölnir.[67]

Mark Protosevich was hired to develop a script for Thor in April 2006, after the rights were acquired from Sony Pictures.[11] In August 2007 Marvel hired Matthew Vaughn to direct the film,[68] however he exited the project in May 2008.[69] In September 2008, Kenneth Branagh entered into negotiations to replace Vaughn.[17] In May 2009, Chris Hemsworth was in negotiations to portray the titular character,[70] and Tom Hiddleston was set to play his brother, Loki.[71] Both actors were contracted to star in several films.[72] Marvel hired the writing team of Ashley Edward Miller and Zack Stentz to write a new script for the film, which was then rewritten by Don Payne.[18] Production began on January 11, 2010 in Los Angeles, California,[73] before moving to Galisteo, New Mexico in March.[74] Thor had its world premiere on April 17, 2011 at the Event Cinemas theater in George Street, Sydney[75] and a U.S. premiere on May 2 at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles, California.[76] The film was released internationally from April 21 to 30, and on May 6 in the United States.[77]

The film takes place simultaneously with the events of The Incredible Hulk and Iron Man 2,[46] the latter of which is set six months after the events of Iron Man.[47] Clark Gregg, who appeared in Iron Man and Iron Man 2 as S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Phil Coulson, reprised the role in Thor. About his role in Thor he stated, "Agent Coulson was one of the guys who wasn't really in the comic books, and he [had] a very kind of small role in Iron Man. And I was just very lucky that they chose to expand that character and [chose] to put him more into the universe of it."[78] After signing on to appear as Clint Barton / Hawkeye in The Avengers, Jeremy Renner made a cameo appearance as the character during a scene in Thor.[79] Branagh said that they "were always going to have a guy in a basket above the action where Thor breaks in the S.H.I.E.L.D. camp", and that he was thrilled when the producers told him they wanted to use Renner's Hawkeye for that role.[80] The film ends with a post-credits scene featuring Loki, watching as Erik Selvig and Nick Fury discuss the Tesseract.[81] The scene was directed by Joss Whedon, who directed The Avengers.[82] Stellan Skarsgård, who plays Selvig, said the scene was not included when he first read the screenplay for Thor, and that he was sent pages for the scene after agreeing to appear in The Avengers.[83]

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)[edit]

In 1942, Steve Rogers is deemed physically unfit to enlist in the U.S. Army and fight the German Reich in World War II. Recruited for a secret military operation, he is physically transformed into a super-soldier dubbed Captain America and must battle the Red Skull, head of a Nazi science division known as Hydra.[84]

In April 2006, Marvel hired David Self to write the script for a Captain America film.[11] Joe Johnston signed on to direct in November 2008,[19] and Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely were hired to rewrite the script.[20] In March 2010, Chris Evans was cast as Captain America and Hugo Weaving was cast as the Red Skull.[85] Production began on June 28, 2010 in the United Kingdom,[86] with locations in London,[87] Caerwent,[88] Manchester and Liverpool.[89] The film premiered on July 19, 2011, at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles, California,[90] and was released in the United States on July 22, and in international markets starting July 27.[91]

The Tesseract from the Thor post-credits scene appears as a MacGuffin in Captain America: The First Avenger.[92] In the film, Dominic Cooper portrays a young Howard Stark, the father of Tony Stark,[93] who hosts an early version of the Stark Expo, the fair Tony hosts in Iron Man 2.[94] The final scene of the film includes a brief appearance by Jackson's Nick Fury followed by a teaser trailer for Marvel's The Avengers after the credits.[95]

Marvel's The Avengers (2012)[edit]

Nick Fury, the director of S.H.I.E.L.D., gathers the superheroes Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, the Hulk, Black Widow and Hawkeye to fight Thor's brother Loki, who plots to subjugate the Earth.[96]

Zak Penn, who wrote The Incredible Hulk, was hired to write a script for The Avengers in June 2007.[97] In April 2010, Joss Whedon closed a deal to direct the film, and to rework Penn's script.[21] Marvel announced that Edward Norton would not be reprising the role of Bruce Banner / Hulk,[98] and in July 2010, Mark Ruffalo was cast in his place.[99] Downey, Evans, Hemsworth, Johansson, Renner, Hiddleston and Jackson reprised their respective roles from previous films.[100] Principal photography began in April 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico,[96] before moving to Cleveland, Ohio in August,[101] and New York City in September.[102] The premiere was held on April 11, 2012 at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles, California,[103] and the film was released in the United States on May 4.[104]

Gwyneth Paltrow, who portrayed Pepper Potts in Iron Man and Iron Man 2, was included in the film at Downey's insistence. Prior to this, Whedon had not intended the film to include supporting characters from the heroes' individual films, commenting, "You need to separate the characters from their support systems in order to create the isolation you need for a team."[105] The supervillain Thanos appears in a mid-credits scene, portrayed by Damion Poitier.[106]

Timeline[edit]

External image
The Phase One Timeline infographic released by Marvel in May 2012[107]

During Phase One, Marvel Studios lined up some of their films' stories with references to one another, though they had no long-term plan for the shared universe's timeline at that point.[46] Iron Man 2 is set six months after the events of Iron Man,[47] and around the same time as Thor according to comments made by Nick Fury.[46] The official tie-in comic Fury's Big Week confirmed that The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man 2, and Thor all took place within a week, a year before the crossover film The Avengers. Writers Chris Yost and Eric Pearson tried to follow the logic of the films' timeline when plotting the comic, and received "the seal of approval" from Feige and Marvel Studios on the final timeline.[108] As promotion ahead of the release of The Avengers, Marvel released an official infographic detailing this timeline in May 2012.[107]

Recurring cast and characters[edit]

List indicator(s)

This section shows characters who have appeared in multiple films within Phase One of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and have appeared in the billing block for at least one film.

  • A dark grey cell indicates the character was not in the film.
  • An OS indicates the character appears in a One-Shot.
  • C indicates an uncredited cameo role.
  • P indicates the character appears in a photograph taken specifically for the film.
  • V indicates a voice-only role.
Character Iron Man
(2008)
The Incredible Hulk
(2008)
Iron Man 2
(2010)
Thor
(2011)
Captain America:
The First Avenger

(2011)
Marvel's
The Avengers

(2012)
Bruce Banner
Hulk
Edward Norton[41]
Lou FerrignoV[109]
Mark Ruffalo[99]
Clint Barton
Hawkeye
Jeremy RennerC[79] Jeremy Renner[100]
Phil CoulsonOS Clark Gregg[110] Clark Gregg[111] Clark Gregg[100]
Nick Fury Samuel L. JacksonC[112] Samuel L. Jackson[112][113] Samuel L. JacksonC[113] Samuel L. Jackson[113]
Loki Tom Hiddleston[71] Tom Hiddleston[114]
Virginia "Pepper" Potts Gwyneth Paltrow[110] Gwyneth Paltrow[115] Gwyneth Paltrow[105]
James "Rhodey" Rhodes
War Machine
Terrence Howard[110] Don Cheadle[116]
Steve Rogers
Captain America
Chris Evans[117]
Natasha Romanoff
Black Widow
Scarlett Johansson[55] Scarlett Johansson[55]
Erik Selvig Stellan Skarsgård[83] Stellan Skarsgård[83]
Howard Stark Gerard SandersP[118] John Slattery[119] Dominic Cooper[120]
Tony Stark
Iron Man
OS
Robert Downey Jr.[25] Robert Downey Jr.C[48] Robert Downey Jr.[121] Robert Downey Jr.[52]
Thor Chris Hemsworth[70] Chris Hemsworth[100]

Music[edit]

Film soundtracks[edit]

Title U.S. release date Length Composer(s) Label
Iron Man: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack May 6, 2008 0:54:14 Ramin Djawadi Lionsgate Records
The Incredible Hulk: Original Motion Picture Score June 13, 2008 1:50:55 Craig Armstrong Marvel Music
Iron Man 2: Original Motion Picture Score July 20, 2010 1:12:01 John Debney Columbia Records
Thor May 3, 2011 1:11:53 Patrick Doyle Buena Vista Records
Marvel Music
Captain America: The First Avenger—Original Motion Picture Soundtrack July 19, 2011 1:11:53 Alan Silvestri
The Avengers (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) May 1, 2012 1:04:25 Hollywood Records
Marvel Music

Compilation albums[edit]

Title U.S. release date Length Label
AC/DC: Iron Man 2 April 19, 2010 (2010-04-19) 60:15 Columbia Records
Avengers Assemble (Music from and Inspired by the Motion Picture) May 1, 2012 (2012-05-01) 48:20 Hollywood Records
Marvel Music

Singles[edit]

Title U.S. release date Length Artist(s) Label
"Live to Rise" April 17, 2012 4:40 Soundgarden Hollywood Records
Marvel Music

Home media[edit]

Film Digital release DVD/Blu-ray release
Iron Man   September 30, 2008 (2008-09-30)
The Incredible Hulk   October 21, 2008 (2008-10-21)
Iron Man 2   September 28, 2010 (2010-09-28)
Thor   September 13, 2011 (2011-09-13)
Captain America: The First Avenger   October 25, 2011 (2011-10-25)
Marvel's The Avengers September 25, 2012 (2012-09-25) September 25, 2012 (2012-09-25)

A 10-disc box set titled "Marvel Cinematic Universe: Phase One – Avengers Assembled" was released on September 25, 2012. The box set includes all six films on Blu-ray and Blu-ray 3D, in a replica of Nick Fury's briefcase from The Avengers.[122] In August 2012, luggage company Rimowa GmbH, which developed the briefcase for The Avengers, filed suit against Marvel Studios and Buena Vista Home Entertainment in U.S. federal court, complaining that "Marvel did not obtain any license or authorization from Rimowa to make replica copies of the cases for any purpose."[123] The set was delayed to early 2013 for the packaging to be redesigned.[124] The box set, with a redesigned case, was released on April 2, 2013. In addition, the box set included a featurette on the then-upcoming Phase Two films, showing footage and concept art, as well as previously unreleased deleted scenes from all of the Phase One films.[125]

Reception[edit]

Box office performance[edit]

The Marvel Cinematic Universe films are the highest-grossing film franchise of all time worldwide, both unadjusted and adjusted-for-inflation, having grossed over $22.5 billion at the global box office, with Phase One accounting for $3.8 billion of the total. Although Phase One has the smallest box office gross of all Phases, it contains the first film to reach $1 billion with The Avengers doing so in 2012.[126]

Film U.S. release date Box office gross All-time ranking Budget Ref(s)
U.S. and Canada Other territories Worldwide U.S. and Canada Worldwide
Iron Man May 2, 2008 $318,604,126 $266,762,121 $585,366,247 71 166 $140 million [127]
The Incredible Hulk June 13, 2008 $134,806,913 $128,620,638 $263,427,551 447 558 $150 million [128]
Iron Man 2 May 7, 2010 $312,433,331 $311,500,000 $623,933,331 76 148 $200 million [129]
Thor May 6, 2011 $181,030,624 $268,295,994 $449,326,618 253 250 $150 million [130]
Captain America: The First Avenger July 22, 2011 $176,654,505 $193,915,269 $370,569,774 269 336 $140 million [131]
Marvel's The Avengers May 4, 2012 $623,357,910 $895,455,078 $1,518,812,988 8 8 $220 million [132]
Total $1,746,887,409 $2,064,549,100 $3,811,436,509 $1 billion

Critical and public response[edit]

Film Critical Public
Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore
Iron Man 93% (276 reviews)[133] 79 (38 reviews)[134] A[135]
The Incredible Hulk 67% (230 reviews)[136] 61 (38 reviews)[137] A−[135]
Iron Man 2 73% (293 reviews)[138] 57 (40 reviews)[139] A[135]
Thor 77% (283 reviews)[140] 57 (40 reviews)[141] B+[135]
Captain America: The First Avenger 80% (265 reviews)[142] 66 (43 reviews)[143] A−[135]
Marvel's The Avengers 92% (346 reviews)[144] 69 (43 reviews)[145] A+[135]
Average 80% 65 A–

Tie-in media[edit]

Short films[edit]

Film U.S. release date Director Screenwriter Producer Home media release
The Consultant September 13, 2011 (2011-09-13) Leythum[146] Eric Pearson[147] Kevin Feige Thor
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Thor's Hammer October 25, 2011 (2011-10-25) Captain America: The First Avenger
Item 47 September 25, 2012 (2012-09-25) Louis D'Esposito[147] Marvel's The Avengers

Comic books[edit]

Title Issue(s) Publication date(s) Writer(s) Artist(s)
First published Last published
Iron Man: I Am Iron Man! 2 January 27, 2010 (2010-01-27) February 24, 2010 (2010-02-24) Peter David[148] Sean Chen[148]
Iron Man 2: Public Identity 3 April 28, 2010 (2010-04-28) May 12, 2010 (2010-05-12) Joe Casey and Justin Theroux[149] Barry Kitson[149]
Iron Man 2: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. 1 September 1, 2010 (2010-09-01) Joe Casey[149] Tim Green, Felix Ruiz, and Matt Camp[149]
Captain America: First Vengeance 4 May 4, 2011 (2011-05-04) June 29, 2011 (2011-06-29) Fred Van Lente[150] Neil Edwards[151] and Luke Ross[152]
Marvel's The Avengers Prelude: Fury's Big Week 4 March 7, 2012 (2012-03-07) April 18, 2012 (2012-04-18) Story by: Christopher Yost and Eric Pearson[108]
Scripts by: Eric Pearson[108]
Luke Ross[153]
Marvel's The Avengers: Black Widow Strikes 3 May 2, 2012 (2012-05-02) June 6, 2012 (2012-06-06) Fred Van Lente[154] Neil Edwards[155]
Marvel's Iron Man 2 2 November 7, 2012 (2012-11-07) December 5, 2012 (2012-12-05) Christos N. Gage[156][157] Ramon Rosanas[156]
Marvel's Thor 2 January 16, 2013 (2013-01-16) February 20, 2013 (2013-02-20) Lan Medina[157]
Marvel's Captain America: The First Avenger 2 November 6, 2013 (2013-11-06) December 11, 2013 (2013-12-11) Peter David[158] Wellinton Alves[158]
Marvel's The Avengers 2 December 24, 2014 (2014-12-24) January 7, 2015 (2015-01-07) Will Corona Pilgrim
[159]
Joe Bennett[159]

Books[edit]

In September 2015, Marvel announced the Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, named as a nod to the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe. The guidebooks are compiled by Mike O'Sullivan and the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe team, with cover art from Mike del Mundo and Pascal Campion, and features facts about the MCU films, film-to-comic comparisons, and production stills. Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe: Marvel's Iron Man, Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe: Marvel's Incredible Hulk / Marvel's Iron Man 2,[160] Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe: Marvel's Thor,[161] and Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe: Marvel's Captain America: The First Avenger[162] released each month from October 2015 to January 2016, respectively.

Video games[edit]

Title U.S. release date Publisher Developer Platforms
Console / PC Handhelds Mobile
Iron Man May 2, 2008 (2008-05-02)[163] Sega[163] Secret Level[164] PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Artificial Mind and Movement[164] PlayStation 2, Wii, Microsoft Windows Nintendo DS, PlayStation Portable
Hands-On Mobile[165] Various
The Incredible Hulk June 5, 2008 (2008-06-05)[166] Sega[167] Edge of Reality[166][167] PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Microsoft Windows, Wii
Amaze Entertainment[168] Nintendo DS
Hands-On Mobile[169] Various
Iron Man 2 May 4, 2010 (2010-05-04)[170] Sega Sega Studios San Francisco[170] PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
High Voltage Software[171] Wii PlayStation Portable
Griptonite Games[172] Nintendo DS
Gameloft[173][174] iOS, BlackBerry
Thor: God of Thunder May 3, 2011 (2011-05-03)[175] Sega[175] Liquid Entertainment PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Red Fly Studio Wii Nintendo 3DS
WayForward Technologies Nintendo DS
Captain America: Super Soldier July 19, 2011 (2011-07-19)[176] Sega[176] Next Level Games PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
High Voltage Software Wii Nintendo 3DS
Graphite Games Nintendo DS
Other video games
Lego Marvel's Avengers January 26, 2016 (2016-01-26)[177] Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment TT Games PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U Nintendo 3DS, PlayStation Vita
March 10, 2016 (2016-03-10)[178] Feral Interactive macOS

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zeitchik, Steven (February 23, 2006). "Marvel stock soars on rev outlook". Variety. Archived from the original on February 23, 2013. Retrieved June 17, 2008.
  2. ^ Hughes, Mark (June 19, 2015). "Details Of Marvel's 'Hulk' Film Rights - Fans Can Relax About Sequel". Forbes. Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  3. ^ McClintock, Pamela (April 27, 2006). "Marvel Making Deals for Title Wave". Variety. Archived from the original on May 1, 2011. Retrieved March 1, 2008.
  4. ^ "The Word on Black Widow". IGN. June 5, 2006. Archived from the original on March 2, 2012. Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  5. ^ "Marvel Entertainment Names David Maisel as Chairman, Marvel Studios and Kevin Feige as President..." Business Wire. AllBusiness.com, Inc. March 13, 2007. Archived from the original on May 11, 2009. Retrieved July 1, 2008.
  6. ^ Kim Masters (October 18, 2010). "Disney to Distribute Marvel's 'The Avengers,' 'Iron Man 3'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 3, 2014. Retrieved October 18, 2010.
  7. ^ Finke, Nikki (May 6, 2012). "Paramount Makes Money Off 'Avengers' Too". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 10, 2013. Retrieved October 10, 2012.
  8. ^ Finke, Nikki (July 2, 2013). "Disney Completes Purchase Of Marvel Home Entertainment Distribution Rights". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 5, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2013.
  9. ^ Palmeri, Christopher (July 2, 2013). "Disney Buys Rights to Four Marvel Movies From Viacom's Paramount". Bloomberg.com. Archived from the original on April 21, 2014. Retrieved July 2, 2013.
  10. ^ Trumbore, Dave (May 1, 2018). "MCU Timeline Explained: From Infinity Stones to Infinity War and Beyond". Collider. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  11. ^ a b c d e f McClintock, Pamela (April 27, 2006). "Marvel Making Deals for Title Wave". Variety. Archived from the original on October 25, 2012. Retrieved March 1, 2008.
  12. ^ a b Jensen, Jeff (April 17, 2008). "Iron Man: Summer's first Marvel?". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on May 22, 2013. Retrieved April 21, 2008.
  13. ^ a b c Cairns, Bryan (October 3, 2011). "Director Louis Leterrier Talks Incredible Hulk". Newsarama.com. Archived from the original on September 18, 2012. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  14. ^ a b Juarez, Vanessa (July 26, 2008). "Comic-Con: 'Incredible Hulk' screenwriter Zak Penn discusses strife with Edward Norton". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 21, 2013.
  15. ^ a b Finke, Nikki (July 9, 2008). "So What Was All The Fuss About? Marvel Locks in Jon Favreau For 'Iron Man 2′". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on July 29, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  16. ^ a b Graser, Marc (July 15, 2008). "Theroux to write 'Iron Man' sequel". Variety. Archived from the original on November 6, 2012. Retrieved July 16, 2008.
  17. ^ a b Fleming, Michael (September 28, 2008). "Branagh in talks to direct 'Thor'". Variety. Archived from the original on April 18, 2015. Retrieved September 29, 2008.
  18. ^ a b "Thor Movie: New Release Date! May 6, 2011". Marvel.com. January 7, 2010. Archived from the original on March 1, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  19. ^ a b Kit, Borys (November 9, 2008). "'Captain America' recruits director". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012. Retrieved November 10, 2008.
  20. ^ a b Kit, Borys; Fernandez, Jay A. (November 18, 2008). "'Captain America' enlists two scribes". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on September 30, 2011. Retrieved November 19, 2008.. (First paragraph; subscription required for full story.)
  21. ^ a b Graser, Marc (April 13, 2010). "Whedon to head 'Avengers'". Variety. Archived from the original on April 25, 2011. Retrieved April 14, 2010.
  22. ^ Guedj, Philippe (May 2, 2014). "Avi Arad: 'J'ai pardonné à Kevin Feige, il suivait des ordres' (Exclu Daily Mars)". Daily Mars. Archived from the original on July 23, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2015.
  23. ^ "Iron Man". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on February 28, 2014. Retrieved November 4, 2013.
  24. ^ "Fav irons out Marvel plans". Total Film. June 22, 2006. Archived from the original on April 16, 2014. Retrieved April 15, 2014.
  25. ^ a b "Iron Man Has Been Cast". IGN. September 29, 2006. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved March 25, 2013.
  26. ^ "Funding Initiated for Iron Man Movie". SuperHeroHype.com. February 28, 2007. Archived from the original on June 18, 2013. Retrieved February 28, 2007.
  27. ^ Favreau, Jon (March 19, 2007). "Jon Favreau on Iron Man filming". SuperHeroHype.com. Archived from the original on June 18, 2013. Retrieved March 19, 2007.
  28. ^ "Iron Man Production Notes". SciFi Japan. April 30, 2008. Archived from the original on May 26, 2013. Retrieved March 28, 2013.
  29. ^ Raab, Scott (February 21, 2007). "May God Bless and Keep Robert Downey Jr". Esquire. Archived from the original on January 14, 2014. Retrieved February 23, 2007.
  30. ^ "Flying with the stars". Edwards Air Force Base. April 6, 2007. Archived from the original on November 4, 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2007.
  31. ^ Favreau, Jon (June 25, 2007). "Iron Man Movie Update!". SuperHeroHype.com. Archived from the original on June 18, 2013. Retrieved June 26, 2007.
  32. ^ "Iron Man Aussie Premiere Pics". SuperHeroHype.com. April 14, 2008. Archived from the original on June 17, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2008.
  33. ^ Sciretta, Peter (March 12, 2008). "Iron Man Not Coming Early". /Film. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  34. ^ "Iron-Clad Date: May 2, 2008". Marvel.com. June 23, 2006. Archived from the original on March 1, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  35. ^ Vary, Adam B. (May 5, 2008). "Jon Favreau talks 'Iron Man'". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on June 6, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  36. ^ a b Marshall, Rick (May 10, 2010). "Captain America's Shield In 'Iron Man 2'? Jon Favreau Explains The Crossover Cameo!". MTV News. Archived from the original on September 14, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  37. ^ "The Incredible Hulk". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on November 3, 2013. Retrieved November 4, 2013.
  38. ^ Knowles, Harry (January 18, 2006). "Hulk 2-story BS!". Ain't It Cool News. Archived from the original on May 18, 2013. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  39. ^ a b Zeitchik, Steven (February 23, 2006). "Marvel stock soars on rev outlook". Variety. Archived from the original on November 18, 2012. Retrieved June 17, 2008.
  40. ^ Douglas, Edward (April 16, 2007). "Zak Penn on Norton as Hulk!". SuperHeroHype.com. Archived from the original on May 25, 2013. Retrieved April 17, 2007.
  41. ^ a b Fernandez, Jay A. (August 15, 2007). "Signing on to a writing co-op". Los Angeles Times. p. 2. Archived from the original on August 5, 2014. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  42. ^ The Making of Incredible, 2008 DVD documentary
  43. ^ "Hulk Filming at CFB Trenton". SuperHeroHype.com. July 31, 2007. Archived from the original on May 25, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2007.
  44. ^ "World Premiere of 'The Incredible Hulk'". Hollywood.com. Archived from the original on February 25, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  45. ^ "The Incredible Hulk to Smash into Theaters June 13, 2008". Marvel.com. November 6, 2006. Archived from the original on March 1, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  46. ^ a b c d e Eisenberg, Eric (April 27, 2017). "Why Marvel Movies Don't Overlap Like They Used To, According To Kevin Feige". CinemaBlend. Archived from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 28, 2017.
  47. ^ a b c d Cornelius, Doug (May 8, 2010). "10 Things Parents Should Know About Iron Man 2". Wired. Archived from the original on July 30, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  48. ^ a b Carroll, Larry (March 17, 2008). "'Iron Man' Star Robert Downey Jr. Talks About 'Incredible Hulk' Cameo, Controversial 'Tropic Thunder' Pics". MTV News. Archived from the original on November 7, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  49. ^ Sciretta, Peter (October 11, 2008). "Captain America Found in The Incredible Hulk Deleted Scene". /Film. Archived from the original on April 16, 2014. Retrieved April 15, 2014.
  50. ^ Weintraub, Steve 'Frosty' (March 28, 2010). "First Iron Man 2 TV Spot airs on the Kids Choice Awards". Collider. Archived from the original on October 11, 2013. Retrieved November 4, 2013.
  51. ^ "Marvel Announces 'Iron Man 2'". Access Hollywood. May 5, 2008. Archived from the original on July 26, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  52. ^ a b Kit, Borys (October 29, 2008). "Downey, Favreau sign on for 'Avengers' at Marvel". The Hollywood Reporter via Reuters. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved March 26, 2013.
  53. ^ Susman, Gary (October 14, 2008). "'Iron Man 2': Terrence Howard's out, Don Cheadle's in". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on July 3, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  54. ^ Fleming, Michael (February 25, 2009). "Samuel Jackson joins 'Iron' cast". Variety. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2009.
  55. ^ a b c Finke, Nikki (March 11, 2009). "Another 'Iron Man 2' Deal: Scarlett Johannson To Replace Emily Blunt As Black Widow For Lousy Lowball Money". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on August 29, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  56. ^ "Iron Man 2 Wraps on Schedule". Marvel.com. July 18, 2009. Archived from the original on November 8, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  57. ^ "Iron Man 2 Filming at the Pasadena Masonic Temple?". SuperHeroHype.com. April 5, 2009. Archived from the original on July 21, 2012. Retrieved August 13, 2012.
  58. ^ a b Witmer, Jon D. (May 2010). "Armor Wars: Cinematographer Matthew Libatique, ASC and director Jon Favreau shoot to thrill with the action-packed Iron Man 2". American Cinematographer. Archived from the original on August 14, 2012. Retrieved August 13, 2012.
  59. ^ "Team Edwards goes Hollywood". Edwards Air Force Base. May 21, 2009. Archived from the original on May 27, 2012. Retrieved August 13, 2012.
  60. ^ Garrett, Jerry (May 7, 2010). "'Iron Man 2' and the Fate of the Rolls-Royces". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 4, 2012. Retrieved August 13, 2012.
  61. ^ Boucher, Geoff (April 28, 2010). "'Iron Man 2' premiere: It's like real life but different". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  62. ^ "Iron Man 2: International Release Dates". Marvel.com. April 2, 2010. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  63. ^ Filipponi, Pietro (September 19, 2010). "Jon Favreau Confirms Black Panther Easter Egg in Iron Man 2, Among Others". The Daily Blam!. Archived from the original on March 2, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2011.
  64. ^ Bradley, Bill (June 26, 2017). "Tom Holland Confirms Popular Fan Theory: Spider-Man Was In 'Iron Man 2'". HuffPost. Archived from the original on June 27, 2017. Retrieved June 26, 2017.
  65. ^ Ryan, Mark (June 27, 2017). "'Spider-Man: Homecoming' Director Jon Watts Explains Real Story Behind Peter Parker's 'Iron Man 2' Cameo". Uproxx. Archived from the original on June 27, 2017. Retrieved June 27, 2017.
  66. ^ Marshall, Rick (April 28, 2010). "'Iron Man 2' Post-Credits Scene Revealed!". MTV News. Archived from the original on January 3, 2011. Retrieved October 20, 2010.
  67. ^ "Thor Movie: New Release Date! May 6, 2011". Marvel Comics. January 7, 2010. Archived from the original on November 7, 2013. Retrieved November 4, 2013.
  68. ^ Fleming, Michael (August 9, 2007). "Matthew Vaughn to direct 'Thor'". Variety. Archived from the original on July 10, 2010. Retrieved May 28, 2009.
  69. ^ Davis, Erik (May 8, 2008). "'Thor' Needs New Director, Hulk to Cameo in 'Iron Man 2'?". Cinematical. Moviefone. Archived from the original on February 27, 2010. Retrieved May 28, 2009.
  70. ^ a b Finke, Nikki (May 16, 2009). "Exclusive: Chris Hemsworth is Thor". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on May 17, 2011. Retrieved May 19, 2009.
  71. ^ a b "Marvel Studios Update: Loki Officially Cast in 2011 Thor Movie". Marvel.com. May 18, 2009. Archived from the original on March 27, 2011. Retrieved May 19, 2009.
  72. ^ Billington, Alex (June 7, 2009). "Profile on Marvel Studios with Big Updates from Kevin Feige". Firstshowing.net. Archived from the original on November 25, 2010. Retrieved January 7, 2010.
  73. ^ "Thor Movie: Principal Photography Starts!". Marvel.com. January 11, 2010. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved February 22, 2011.
  74. ^ Bord, Christine (March 11, 2010). "'Thor' Begins Filming in New Mexico on Monday". OnLocationVacations.com. Archived from the original on October 3, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2010.
  75. ^ "On the Spot: Kenneth Branagh's Thor World Premiere in Sydney!". The Spotlight Report. April 18, 2011. Archived from the original on March 31, 2012. Retrieved October 21, 2011.
  76. ^ "Watch the U.S. Premiere of Thor, Live on Marvel.com". Marvel.com. April 26, 2011. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved April 27, 2011.
  77. ^ "Learn Thor's International Release Dates". Marvel.com. November 10, 2010. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved November 23, 2010.
  78. ^ Marnell, Blair (April 28, 2010). "Clark Gregg's 'Iron Man 2' S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Will 'Do Some Exciting Things' In 'Thor'". MTV News. Archived from the original on September 30, 2012. Retrieved May 13, 2010.
  79. ^ a b "Cinema Con: We've Seen Hawkeye In Thor And It's More Than A Walk On". CinemaBlend. March 28, 2011. Archived from the original on March 7, 2013. Retrieved March 28, 2011.
  80. ^ Boucher, Geoff (May 7, 2011). 'Thor': Kenneth Branagh on the 'crazy Marvel universe'. Los Angeles Times (video). Event occurs at 1:05. Retrieved March 29, 2013. Frankly we were always going to have a guy in a basket above the action where Thor breaks in the S.H.I.E.L.D. camp and when they told me maybe it could be Hawkeye and maybe Hawkeye was going to be Jeremy Renner, 'Are you kidding!', I said. I was jumping up and down. I was thrilled. I get somebody like that to come and do something as cool as that!
  81. ^ Franich, Darren (May 7, 2011). "'Thor' post-credits scene: What the heck WAS that thing?". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on June 6, 2013. Retrieved March 26, 2013.
  82. ^ Hewitt, Chris (May 20, 2011). "Stellan Skarsgard Talks Thor Sting". Empire. Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved May 23, 2011.
  83. ^ a b c Philbrick, Jami (August 31, 2011). "Stellan Skarsgard Talks 'The Avengers,' 'The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,' and 'Melancholia'". IAmRogue.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2013. Retrieved September 1, 2011.
  84. ^ Ames, Jeff (October 28, 2010). "More Images from Captain America: The First Avenger; First Look at Hugo Weaving and Stanley Tucci". Collider. Archived from the original on February 28, 2014. Retrieved November 13, 2010.
  85. ^ Graser, Marc (March 22, 2010). "Chris Evans to play 'Captain America'". Variety. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved March 23, 2010.
  86. ^ "Captain America to Start Filming June 28". SuperHeroHype.com. April 28, 2010. Archived from the original on April 11, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013.
  87. ^ "Summer in the City". Film London. July 7, 2010. Archived from the original on July 25, 2011. Retrieved July 9, 2010.
  88. ^ "Caerwent is scene for Captain America movie". South Wales Argus. July 28, 2011. Archived from the original on July 31, 2011. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  89. ^ Collinson, Dawn (September 16, 2010). "Captain America Filming to Get Underway on Liverpool Docklands". Liverpool Daily Post. Archived from the original on September 21, 2010. Retrieved September 27, 2010.
  90. ^ "Watch the Captain America Red Carpet Premiere LIVE on Marvel.com". Marvel.com. July 15, 2011. Archived from the original on November 7, 2012. Retrieved July 18, 2011.
  91. ^ "Global sites & Release Dates". Paramount Pictures. Archived from the original on July 19, 2011. Retrieved May 6, 2011.
  92. ^ Winning, Josh (January 10, 2011). "Captain America image gives a first look at Cosmic Cube". Total Film. Archived from the original on July 20, 2013. Retrieved March 26, 2013.
  93. ^ Fischer, Russ (May 24, 2010). "Dominic Cooper Says He's Howard Stark in Captain America". /Film. Archived from the original on October 1, 2012. Retrieved June 30, 2010.
  94. ^ Marnell, Blair (April 23, 2010). "Jon Favreau Explains The History of Stark Expo In 'Iron Man 2'". MTV News. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved March 26, 2013.
  95. ^ Lesnick, Silas (July 28, 2011). "Watch the Final Scene of Captain America". SuperHeroHype.com. Archived from the original on April 2, 2013. Retrieved March 26, 2013.
  96. ^ a b "Marvel's The Avengers Begins Production". Marvel.com. April 26, 2011. Archived from the original on April 29, 2011. Retrieved April 26, 2011.
  97. ^ Kit, Borys (June 14, 2007). "'Avengers' are heroes on horizon". The Hollywood Reporter via Reuters. Archived from the original on October 23, 2012. Retrieved April 26, 2011.
  98. ^ McWeeny, Drew (July 10, 2010). "Exclusive: Marvel confirms they will hire new 'Hulk' for 'The Avengers'". HitFix. Archived from the original on July 4, 2011. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  99. ^ a b Finke, Nikki (July 23, 2010). "Toldja! Marvel & Ruffalo Ink Hulk Deal". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 15, 2011. Retrieved July 23, 2010.
  100. ^ a b c d "Marvel-ous Star Wattage: Actors Assemble For Comic-Con Panel Including 'The Avengers', 'Captain America', & 'Thor'". Deadline Hollywood. July 24, 2010. Archived from the original on July 5, 2011. Retrieved July 25, 2010.
  101. ^ Sangiacomo, Michael (August 8, 2011). "Avengers workers start transforming East Ninth into scene for epic battle". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland, Ohio. Archived from the original on May 12, 2012. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  102. ^ Sangiacomo, Michael (August 28, 2011). "Filming of 'Avengers' in Cleveland approaches the end". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland, Ohio. Archived from the original on December 25, 2011. Retrieved September 2, 2011.
  103. ^ O'Connell, Michael (March 16, 2012). "Marvel Sets 'The Avengers' World Premiere for April 11". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 19, 2012. Retrieved March 19, 2012.
  104. ^ Alexander, Bryan (May 4, 2012). "Iron Man leads the core four of 'The Avengers'". USA Today. Archived from the original on April 16, 2014. Retrieved April 15, 2014.
  105. ^ a b Donnelly, Matt (April 17, 2012). "How Gwyneth Paltrow was recruited for 'The Avengers'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on May 4, 2012. Retrieved June 23, 2012.
  106. ^ Schwartz, Terri (May 2, 2012). "'The Avengers' has two post-credit scenes, mystery actor revealed". IFC. Archived from the original on May 5, 2012. Retrieved May 6, 2012.
  107. ^ a b Franich, Darren (May 17, 2012). "'Avengers' timeline: Nick Fury's busy week". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 15, 2015. Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  108. ^ a b c "Writing The Avengers Movie Prelude". Marvel.com. March 6, 2012. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  109. ^ Ebert, Roger (June 12, 2008). "The Incredible Hulk (PG-13)". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on March 11, 2013. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  110. ^ a b c Ebert, Roger (June 1, 2008). "Iron Man (PG-13)". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2013.
  111. ^ Graser, Marc (January 18, 2010). "Gregg pulls double duty". Variety. Archived from the original on January 26, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  112. ^ a b Fleming, Michael (February 25, 2009). "Samuel Jackson joins 'Iron' cast". Variety. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2009.
  113. ^ a b c Marshall, Rick (February 3, 2011). "Nick Fury's 'Thor' & 'Captain America' Cameos Confirmed, Four Actresses Vying For New 'Avengers' Role". MTV News. Archived from the original on March 11, 2014. Retrieved March 29, 2013.
  114. ^ Philbrick, Jami (May 1, 2011). "Exclusive: Tom Hiddleston Discusses Loki's Role in 'The Avengers'". IAmRogue.com. Archived from the original on July 5, 2011. Retrieved May 1, 2011.
  115. ^ Weintraub, Steve (April 23, 2010). "Iron Man 2 Interview (Press Conference) with Robert Downey Jr., Mickey Rourke, Jon Favreau, Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, Don Cheadle, Justin Thoreaux and Kevin Feige". Collider.com. Archived from the original on December 27, 2013. Retrieved March 23, 2013.
  116. ^ Weintraub, Steve (April 23, 2010). "Iron Man 2 Interview (Press Conference) with Robert Downey Jr., Mickey Rourke, Jon Favreau, Gwyneth Paltrow, Scarlett Johansson, Don Cheadle, Justin Thoreaux and Kevin Feige". Collider.com. Archived from the original on March 23, 2013. Retrieved March 23, 2013.
  117. ^ Graser, Marc (March 22, 2010). "Chris Evans to play 'Captain America'". Variety. Archived from the original on June 19, 2010. Retrieved March 23, 2010.
  118. ^ Holtreman, Vic (August 22, 2013). "Iron Man 2: Set Visit, Story Details & Meet Howard Stark". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on August 1, 2009. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  119. ^ Vejvoda, Jim (June 4, 2009). "Iron Man 2 Sneak Peek". IGN. Archived from the original on December 22, 2014. Retrieved June 5, 2009.
  120. ^ Philbrick, Jami (June 21, 2011). "Dominic Cooper talks 'Captain America: The First Avenger'". IAmRogue.com. Archived from the original on January 23, 2014. Retrieved March 29, 2013.
  121. ^ Kit, Borys (October 29, 2008). "Downey, Favreau are 'Avengers' for Marvel". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 16, 2014. Retrieved March 23, 2013.
  122. ^ Lee, Jason (June 6, 2012). "'Marvel Cinematic Universe' 10-disc Blu-ray set announced". HD-Report. Archived from the original on July 30, 2019. Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  123. ^ Gardner, Eriq (August 3, 2012). "Marvel Sued by Luggage Company Over 'Avengers' Box Set Packaging". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 30, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2012.
  124. ^ Breznican, Anthony (September 6, 2012). "Briefcase lawsuit delays Marvel's 'Phase One' box set until next spring – Exclusive". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on September 27, 2013. Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  125. ^ Breznican, Anthony (November 20, 2012). "Marvel's delayed 'Phase One' box set to now feature 'Phase Two' tease – Video". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 27, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  126. ^ "Marvel Cinematic Universe Movies at the Box Office : Worldwide (Unadjusted)". Box Office Mojo. June 17, 2019. Archived from the original on July 30, 2019.
  127. ^ "Iron Man (2008)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 23, 2019.
  128. ^ "The Incredible Hulk (2008)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  129. ^ "Iron Man 2 (2010)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 23, 2019.
  130. ^ "Thor (2011)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 21, 2019.
  131. ^ "Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 13, 2019.
  132. ^ "The Avengers (2012)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved September 1, 2019.
  133. ^ "Iron Man (2008)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  134. ^ "Iron Man". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  135. ^ a b c d e f "CinemaScore". CinemaScore. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  136. ^ "The Incredible Hulk (2008)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  137. ^ "The Incredible Hulk". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  138. ^ "Iron Man 2 (2010)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  139. ^ "Iron Man 2". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  140. ^ "Thor (2011)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved June 8, 2019.
  141. ^ "Thor". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  142. ^ "Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved June 8, 2019.
  143. ^ "Captain America: The First Avenger". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  144. ^ "Marvel's The Avengers (2012)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved June 8, 2019.
  145. ^ "The Avengers". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  146. ^ Strom, Marc (August 2, 2011). "Marvel One-Shots: Expanding the Cinematic Universe". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2014. Retrieved September 26, 2011.
  147. ^ a b Breznican, Anthony (July 3, 2012). "First Look: Marvel unveils top-secret 'Avengers' short film 'Item 47' – Exclusive". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 29, 2014. Retrieved January 13, 2014.
  148. ^ a b "Iron Man: I Am Iron Man! (2010) #1". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on July 20, 2014. Retrieved June 6, 2014.
  149. ^ a b c d "Iron Man 2: From Film to Comics". Marvel.com. September 13, 2010. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  150. ^ "Captain America: The First Avenger's First Vengeance". Marvel.com. September 6, 2011. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  151. ^ "Captain America: First Vengeance (2011) #1". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  152. ^ "Captain America: First Vengeance (2010) #3". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on October 17, 2014. Retrieved October 18, 2014.
  153. ^ "Marvel's The Avengers Prelude: Fury's Big Week (2011) #1". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2014.
  154. ^ Arrant, Chris (April 9, 2012). "To Russia with Guns: The Black Widow Strikes". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved May 3, 2013.
  155. ^ "Marvel's The Avengers: Black Widow Strikes (2012) #1". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2013.
  156. ^ a b "Marvel's Iron Man 2 Adaptation (2012)". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on July 20, 2014. Retrieved June 6, 2014.
  157. ^ a b TFAW (January 16, 2013). "Marvels Thor Adaptation #1 (of 2)". TFAW. Archived from the original on July 20, 2014. Retrieved May 3, 2013.
  158. ^ a b "Marvel's Captain America: The First Avenger Adaptation (2013 – PRESENT)". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on July 20, 2014. Retrieved June 6, 2014.
  159. ^ a b "Marvel Comics FULL DECEMBER 2014 SOLICITATIONS". Newsarama. September 16, 2014. Archived from the original on March 1, 2015. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  160. ^ Cowen, Trace William (September 9, 2015). "Earn a PhD in Marvel With the Official 'Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe' Series". Complex. Archived from the original on September 10, 2015. Retrieved September 9, 2015.
  161. ^ "Preview: Guidebook To The Marvel Cinematic Universe – Marvel's Thor #1". Comic Book Resources. December 17, 2015. Archived from the original on January 26, 2016. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  162. ^ "Preview: Guidebook To The Marvel Cinematic Universe – Marvel's Captain America: The First Avenger #1". Comic Book Resources. January 21, 2016. Archived from the original on January 26, 2016. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  163. ^ a b Geddes, Ryan (March 20, 2008). "Iron Man Film Cast To Voice Game". IGN. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  164. ^ a b "Iron Man". Polygon. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  165. ^ "Hands-On Mobile And Marvel Entertainment Bring Iron Man To Mobile". IGN. April 30, 2008. Archived from the original on April 3, 2013. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  166. ^ a b Provo, Frank (June 11, 2008). "The Incredible Hulk Review". GamesRadar. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  167. ^ a b Burg, Dustin (April 9, 2008). "The Incredible Hulk features incredible voice talent". Engadget. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  168. ^ "The Incredible Hulk Nintendo DS". Nintendo. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  169. ^ "The Incredible Hulk Smashes onto Mobile Phone Worldwide". IGN. June 13, 2008. Archived from the original on August 2, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  170. ^ a b "Iron Man 2". Game Informer. GameStop. Archived from the original on May 9, 2010. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  171. ^ Devries, Jack (May 21, 2010). "Iron Man 2 Review (Wii)". IGN. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  172. ^ "Iron Man 2". IGN. Archived from the original on July 1, 2012. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  173. ^ Buchanan, Levi (May 10, 2010). "Iron Man 2 iPad Review". IGN. Archived from the original on January 27, 2013. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  174. ^ "Iron Man 2". BlackBerry World. Archived from the original on March 11, 2015. Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  175. ^ a b "Thor: God of Thunder". Polygon. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  176. ^ a b "Captain America: Super Soldier". Polygon. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  177. ^ Dornbush, Jonathon (October 12, 2015). "Lego Marvel's Avengers to include Phase 2, Agent Carter, more content". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 14, 2015. Retrieved December 14, 2015.
  178. ^ "LEGO® Marvel's Avengers™: A brand new action-packed, Super Hero adventure out now for Mac!". Feral Interactive. March 10, 2016. Retrieved March 10, 2016.

Cite error: A list-defined reference named "FavreauIMIM2IM3" is not used in the content (see the help page).