Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award

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Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award
CountryUnited States
Presented byMajor League Baseball Players Association
History
First award1997
Most recentAnthony Rizzo, Chicago Cubs
External image
Marvin Miller, the namesake of the award

The Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award is given annually to a Major League Baseball (MLB) player "whose on-field performance and contributions to his community inspire others to higher levels of achievement."[1][2] The award was created by the Major League Baseball Players' Association (MLBPA) and was presented to the inaugural winner—Mark McGwire—in 1997 as the "Man of the Year Award".[3] Three years later,[3] it was renamed in honor of Marvin Miller, the first executive director of the MLBPA.[4] The award forms part of the Players Choice Awards.[1][5]

In order to determine the winner, each MLB team nominates one of their players, who is selected by their teammates to appear on the ballot.[1] An online vote is conducted among baseball fans in order to reduce the number of candidates to six. MLB players then choose the award winner from among the six finalists.[6][7] In addition to the award, recipients have $50,000 donated on their behalf to charities of their choice by the MLB Players Trust.[8][9][10] John Smoltz, Jim Thome, Michael Young, and Curtis Granderson are the only players to win the Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award twice.[11] Three winners—Paul Molitor, Jim Thome, and Smoltz—are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.[12]

Winners of the Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award have undertaken a variety of different causes. Many winners, including McGwire,[13] Thome,[14] Smoltz,[15] Mike Sweeney,[5] Torii Hunter,[16] Young,[17] Curtis Granderson[8] and Brandon Inge,[18] worked with children in need. McGwire established a foundation to assist children who were physically or sexually abused,[13] while Inge visited disabled children at the Mott Children's Hospital and donated part of his salary to raise money for a pediatric cancer infusion center.[18] Other winners devoted their work to aiding individuals who had a specific illness, such as Albert Pujols, whose daughter suffers from Down syndrome, and who devoted the Pujols Family Foundation to helping those with the disease,[19] and Chipper Jones, who has been raising money for cystic fibrosis since 1996, after meeting an 11-year-old fan who suffered from the disease and who died several weeks after meeting Jones through the Make-A-Wish Foundation.[10]

Winners[edit]

Paul Molitor in a navy blue baseball jersey with "Twins" written across the chest holding a navy blue cap and smiling.
Paul Molitor, the 1998 recipient, is one of four award winners to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Michael Young, wearing a blue batting helmet and baseball jersey with the lettering TEXAS across it and the Flag of Texas on the left sleeve, clutches a baseball bat in his left hand and looks towards the left after hitting a baseball.
Michael Young is one of four players to win the award on multiple occasions.
Mariano Rivera, wearing a grey uniform with the lettering "NEW YORK" across it, with his body facing the right as he prepares to throw a baseball.
Mariano Rivera won the award in 2013, the final year of his career.[20]
Key
Year Links to the article about the corresponding Major League Baseball year
Player (X) Name of the player and number of times they had won the award at that point (if more than one)
Team The player's team at the time he won the award
Position The player's position at the time he won the award
dagger Member of the Baseball Hall of Fame
double-dagger Player is active
Winners
Year Player Team Position Ref
1997 Mark McGwire Oakland Athletics
St. Louis Cardinals
First baseman [21]
1998 Paul Molitordagger Minnesota Twins Designated hitter [22]
1999 Sammy Sosa Chicago Cubs Outfielder [23]
2000 Eric Davis St. Louis Cardinals Outfielder [24]
2001 Jim Thomedagger Cleveland Indians First baseman [25]
2002 John Smoltzdagger Atlanta Braves Relief pitcher [26]
2003 John Smoltzdagger (2) Atlanta Braves Relief pitcher [26]
2004 Jim Thomedagger (2) Philadelphia Phillies First baseman [25]
2005 Mike Sweeney Kansas City Royals First baseman [27]
2006 Albert Pujolsdouble-dagger St. Louis Cardinals First baseman [28]
2007 Torii Hunter Minnesota Twins Outfielder [29]
2008 Michael Young Texas Rangers Shortstop [30]
2009 Curtis Grandersondouble-dagger Detroit Tigers Outfielder [31]
2010 Brandon Ingedouble-dagger Detroit Tigers Third baseman [32]
2011 Michael Young (2) Texas Rangers Infielder[A] [30]
2012 Chipper Jonesdagger Atlanta Braves Third baseman [33]
2013 Mariano Rivera New York Yankees Relief pitcher [34]
2014 Clayton Kershawdouble-dagger Los Angeles Dodgers Starting pitcher [35]
2015 Adam Jonesdouble-dagger Baltimore Orioles Outfielder [36]
2016 Curtis Grandersondouble-dagger (2) New York Mets Outfielder [37]
2017 Anthony Rizzodouble-dagger Chicago Cubs First baseman [38]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ During the 2011 season, Young played 40 games at third base, 36 games at first base, 14 games at second base and one game at shortstop.[30]

References[edit]

General

  • "Marvin Miller Man of the Year Award". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  • "Players Choice Awards winners". mlbplayers.mlb.com. Major League Baseball Players Association. Retrieved January 23, 2014.

Specific

  1. ^ a b c Snyder, Matt (September 10, 2013). "Fans can help pick Marvin Miller Man of the Year award winner". CBS Sport. CBS. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  2. ^ "Schilling wins charity award". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. Associated Press. October 29, 2001. p. C4. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  3. ^ a b "Players Choice Awards winners". mlbplayers.mlb.com. Major League Baseball Players Association. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  4. ^ Noble, Marty (November 27, 2012). "Influential union chief Miller dies at age 95". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Dutton, Bob (November 4, 2005). "Man of the Year Royals' Mike Sweeney recognized for his work on the field and off". The Kansas City Star. p. D1. Retrieved January 25, 2014. (subscription required)
  6. ^ "Finalists Announced for Miller Award". The Ledger. Lakeland. September 18, 2002. p. C8. Retrieved January 28, 2014.
  7. ^ Andro, Anthony (November 3, 2011). "Young tabbed Marvin Miller Man of the Year". Fox Sports. Fox Entertainment Group. Retrieved January 28, 2014.
  8. ^ a b Lapointe, Joe (April 16, 2010). "Yankees' Granderson Honored for His Off-Field Work". The New York Times. Retrieved January 28, 2014.
  9. ^ "Curtis Granderson Named Man Of The Year By Major League Baseball Players". UIC Flames. University of Illinois at Chicago. October 30, 2009. Retrieved January 28, 2014.
  10. ^ a b Bowman, Mark (November 5, 2012). "Chipper honored with Man of the Year Award". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved January 28, 2014.
  11. ^ "Rangers' Young voted baseball's man of year". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. November 4, 2011. p. D. Retrieved January 25, 2014. (subscription required)
  12. ^ "Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  13. ^ a b Smith, Claire (December 27, 1997). "Baseball; McGwire Wears His Heart on 19-Inch Biceps". The New York Times. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  14. ^ Huth, Jeff (February 5, 2006). "Winning, grinning important to Thome". The News-Gazette. Champaign–Urbana. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  15. ^ "Player awards announced". The Day. New London, Connecticut. Associated Press. October 17, 2002. p. C4. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  16. ^ Christensen, Joe (October 27, 2007). "Hunter named Marvin Miller Man of the Year". Star Tribune. Minneapolis–Saint Paul. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  17. ^ Newberg, Jamey (December 15, 2009). The Newberg Report: 2010 Bound Edition. Brown Books Publishing Group. p. 49. ISBN 9781933651774. Retrieved January 31, 2014.
  18. ^ a b Beck, Jason (October 29, 2010). "Inge named 2010 Marvin Miller Award winner". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  19. ^ Leach, Matthew (November 8, 2006). "Pujols, Carpenter draw peers' kudos". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved January 30, 2014.[permanent dead link]
  20. ^ Casella, Paul (November 4, 2013). "Mo' haul: Man of Year, two Comeback honors". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved January 28, 2014.
  21. ^ "Mark McGwire Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  22. ^ "Paul Molitor Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  23. ^ "Sammy Sosa Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  24. ^ "Eric Davis Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  25. ^ a b "Jim Thome Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  26. ^ a b "John Smoltz Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  27. ^ "Mike Sweeney Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  28. ^ "Albert Pujols Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  29. ^ "Torii Hunter Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  30. ^ a b c "Michael Young Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  31. ^ "Curtis Granderson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  32. ^ "Brandon Inge Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 23, 2014.
  33. ^ "Chipper Jones Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 24, 2014.
  34. ^ "Mariano Rivera Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 24, 2014.
  35. ^ "Clayton Kershaw Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 4, 2014.
  36. ^ "Adam Jones Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 10, 2015.
  37. ^ "Curtis Granderson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  38. ^ "Anthony Rizzo Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 8, 2017.