Mary A. Gardner Holland

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Mary A. Gardner Holland
Mary A. Gardner Holland signature

Mary A. Gardner Holland, also known as Mary G. Holland, was a Union nurse during the American Civil War.[1] The book begins with an introduction by Holland herself; she writes "what more fitting place for women with holy motives and tenderest sympathy than on those fields of blood and death or in retreats prepared for our suffering heroes?"[2] According to Holland's account, she worked in hospitals for about fourteen months. She would have enlisted early, she writes, if she didn't have an aging mother depending upon her.[3] Ultimately, Holland cared for her mother during the day then worked with the Sanitary Commission weekday evenings until Holland wrote to Dorothea Dix asking to be recruited.[4] Holland was stationed at Colombia College Hospital in Meridian Heights, a suburb of Washington DC. From there she went to West Washington and then to Annapolis, serving as a matron.[1]

Post-war life and book[edit]

Thirty years after the war, Holland compiled accounts from numerous Civil War nurses into her book Our Army Nurses: Stories from Women in the Civil War.[5] Her book was initially compiled in 1897; the book has recently been reissued.[5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Holland, Mary Gardner (2002). Our Army Nurses:Stories from Women in the Civil War. Roseville: Edinborough Press. p. 7. ISBN 9781889020044.
  2. ^ Holland, Mary Gardner (2002). Our Army Nurses:Stories from Women in the Civil War. Roseville: Edinborough Press. pp. 5–6. ISBN 9781889020044.
  3. ^ Holland, Mary Gardner (2002). Our Army Nurses:Stories from Women in the Civil War. Roseville: Edinborough Press. p. 6. ISBN 9781889020044.
  4. ^ Holland, Mary Gardner (2002). Our Army Nurses:Stories from Women in the Civil War. Roseville: Edinborough Press. pp. 6–7. ISBN 9781889020044.
  5. ^ a b "Battle Cries and Lullabies: Women in War from Prehistory to the Present". Google Books. Retrieved 2017-02-25.
  6. ^ "Battlefield Medicine". Duke University Libraries. Retrieved 2017-02-26.
  7. ^ McDevitt, Theresa (Winter 2007). "Our Army Nurses: Stories from Women in the Civil War/Turn Backward, O Time: The Civil War Diary of Amanda Shelton". Annals of Iowa. 66 (1): 85–87.