Mary Engelbreit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Mary Engelbreit
Born (1952-06-05) 5 June 1952 (age 67)
NationalityAmerican
Spouse(s)Phil Delano
Websitewww.maryengelbreit.com

Mary Engelbreit (born June 5, 1952)[1] is a graphic artist and children's book illustrator who launched her own magazine, Mary Engelbreit's Home Companion in 1996. Mary Engelbreit was born in St. Louis, Missouri. She began[when?] her career by designing and creating greeting cards, for which she eventually became famous. Later on she wrote and illustrated children's books.[citation needed]

Biography[edit]

Engelbreit attributes her beginnings in art to getting eyeglasses in second grade and being able to see details of the world around her clearly for the first time.[2] After meeting her first artist, at age 9, she became convinced she needed her own studio space, which her mother helped set up in the family linen closet.[3]

Interested in art throughout her school years, Engelbreit eventually began to work for a local advertising company, Hot Buttered Graphics.[4] Hoping to work as an illustrator of children's books, she shopped her portfolio around New York City without success. At the suggestion of one art director[who?][why?], she began working in greeting cards; her first nationally distributed greeting card featured a malapropism that played off an old saying, "Life is just a bowl of cherries", showing a girl looking at a chair piled high with bowls, with the legend: "Life is just a chair of bowlies."[5] She began in St.Louis. She also sold her greeting cards, and it was a hit in University City. It was called: "a vast empire of cuteness!"[6]

Engelbreit married Phil Delano, a social worker, in 1977; in 1986, they formed their own company, presently called Mary Engelbreit Studios. The couple has had two children: Evan, born in 1980; and Will, born in 1983. Evan died in June 2000. He left behind a daughter, Mikayla, who Mary and Phil adopted as their own daughter.[7] Engelbreit has a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "St. Louis Walk of Fame". St. Louis Walk of Fame.
  2. ^ Mary Engelbreit. "If You Can Dream It," Guideposts, October 1998, pp. 6.
  3. ^ Mary Engelbreit. "If You Can Dream It," Guideposts, October 1998, pp. 8-9.
  4. ^ Mary Engelbreit. "If You Can Dream It," Guideposts, October 1998, p. 7.
  5. ^ Mary Engelbreit. "If You Can Dream It," Guideposts, October 1998, p. 7-8.
  6. ^ Stout, Hilary (January 16, 1998). "Mary Engelbreit Is Building A Vast Empire of Cuteness". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
  7. ^ Mary Engelbreit. "If You Can Dream It," Guideposts, October 1998, p. 7, 9.
  8. ^ St. Louis Walk of Fame. "St. Louis Walk of Fame Inductees". stlouiswalkoffame.org. Retrieved 25 April 2013.

External links[edit]