Mary Browne

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For other people with the same name, see Mary Brown (disambiguation).
Mary Browne
Mary Browne.jpg
Full name Mary Kendall Browne
Country (sports)  United States
Born (1891-06-03)June 3, 1891
Ventura County, California, U.S.
Died August 19, 1971(1971-08-19) (aged 80)
Laguna Hills, U.S.
Height 5 ft 2 in (1.57 m)
Plays Right-handed
Int. Tennis HoF 1957 (member page)
Singles
Highest ranking No. 1 (U.S. Singles Ranking)
Grand Slam Singles results
French Open F (1926)
US Open W (1912, 1913, 1914)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
Wimbledon W (1926)
US Open W (1912, 1913, 1914, 1921, 1925)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Wimbledon F (1926)
US Open W (1912, 1913, 1914, 1921)

Mary Kendall Browne (June 3, 1891 – August 19, 1971) was the first American female professional tennis player, a World No. 1 amateur tennis player, and an amateur golfer. She was born in Ventura County, California, United States.

Biography[edit]

She was born on June 3, 1891.

According to A. Wallis Myers of The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, Browne was ranked in the world top ten in 1921 (when the rankings began), 1924, and 1926, reaching a career high of World No. 3 in those rankings in 1921.[1] Browne was included in the year-end top ten rankings issued by the United States Lawn Tennis Association in 1913 (when the rankings began), 1914, 1921, 1924, and 1925. She was the top ranked U.S. player in 1914.[2]

She took part in the 1925 and 1926 editions of the Wightman Cup, an annual women's team tennis competition between the United States and Great Britain.

Browne was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1957.

Browne had been playing golf for only a few years when at the 1924 U.S. Women's Amateur, she was runner-up to champion Dorothy Campbell Hurd.

Grand Slam record[edit]

  • French Championships
    • Singles runner-up: 1926
  • Wimbledon
    • Women's Doubles champion': 1926
    • Mixed Doubles runner-up: 1926
  • U.S. Championships
    • Singles champion: 1912, 1913, 1914
    • Singles runner-up: 1921
    • Women's Doubles champion: 1912, 1913, 1914, 1921, 1925
    • Women's Doubles runner-up: 1926
    • Mixed Doubles champion: 1912, 1913, 1914, 1921

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles (3 titles, 2 runners-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1912 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Eleonora Sears 6–4, 6–2
Winner 1913 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Dorothy Green 6–2, 7–5
Winner 1914 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Marie Wagner 6–2, 1–6, 6–1
Runner-up 1921 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Molla Mallory 6–4, 4–6, 2–6
Runner-up 1926 French Championships Clay France Suzanne Lenglen 1–6, 0–6

Doubles (6 titles, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Result Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1912 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Dorothy Green United States Maud Barger-Wallach
United States Mrs. Frederick Schmitz
6–2, 5–7, 6–0
Winner 1913 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Louise Riddell Williams United States Dorothy Green
United States Edna Wildey
12–10, 2–6, 6–3
Winner 1914 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Louise Riddell Williams United States Louise Raymond
United States Edna Wildey
10–8, 6–2
Winner 1921 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Louise Riddell Williams United States Helen Gilleaudeau
United States Mrs. L.G. Morris
6–3, 6–2
Winner 1925 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Helen Wills United States May Sutton Bundy
United States Elizabeth Ryan
6–4, 6–3
Winner 1926 Wimbledon Grass United States Elizabeth Ryan United Kingdom Evelyn Colyer
United Kingdom Kitty McKane Godfree
6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 1926 U.S. National Championships Grass United States Charlotte Chapin United States Eleanor Goss
United States Elizabeth Ryan
6–3, 4–6, 10–12

Grand Slam singles tournament timeline[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A NH
(W) Won tournament; reached (F) final, (SF) semifinal, (QF) quarterfinal; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a (RR) round-robin stage; reached a (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; or (NH) tournament not held.
Tournament 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 Career SR
Australian Championships NH NH NH NH NH NH NH NH NH NH A A A A A 0 / 0
French Championships1 A A A NH NH NH NH NH A A A A NH A F 0 / 1
Wimbledon A A A NH NH NH NH A A A A A A A 1R 0 / 1
U.S. Championships W W W A A A A A A F A A SF 3R SF 3 / 7
SR 1 / 1 1 / 1 1 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 3 3 / 9

SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played.

1Through 1923, the French Championships were open only to French nationals. The World Hard Court Championships (WHCC), actually played on clay in Paris or Brussels, began in 1912 and were open to all nationalities. The results from that tournament are shown here from 1912 through 1914 and from 1920 through 1923. The Olympics replaced the WHCC in 1924, as the Olympics were held in Paris. Beginning in 1925, the French Championships were open to all nationalities, with the results shown here beginning with that year.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Collins, Bud (2008). The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book. New York, N.Y: New Chapter Press. pp. 695, 701. ISBN 0-942257-41-3. 
  2. ^ United States Tennis Association (1988). 1988 Official USTA Tennis Yearbook. Lynn, Massachusetts: H.O. Zimman, Inc. p. 260. 

External links[edit]