Mary Riddle

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Mary Riddle
Born (1902-04-22)April 22, 1902
Bruceport, Washington
Died October 25, 1981(1981-10-25) (aged 79)
Portland, Oregon
Nationality Quinault
Other names Kus-de-cha
Known for First Native American woman airplane pilot

Mary Riddle (also known as Kus-de-cha or Kingfisher,[1] April 22, 1902 – October 25, 1981) was the first Native American woman to earn a pilot's license.[2][3] Soon after earning her pilot's license she also earned her commercial license.[4] Riddle trained as a pilot in Portland and was a member of the Clatsop Tribe in Oregon[2] Quinault Indian Nation in Washington.[5] Riddle started training with Tex Rankin in 1927.[6] She was qualified to fly solo in 1930.[7] Also in 1930, she planned to fly to Washington D.C. with "beaded gifts for President Hoover from Indian Tribes."[8] In June 1934, she was featured on the 99's magazine, The 99er.[9] By 1937 she was performing as a parachutist.[10] She later went to the Spartan School in Tulsa to learn parachute jumping.[11] She did over forty parachute jumps.[6] During World War II, she was recruited by the government to inspect civilian aircraft and work as an aircraft maintenance advisor.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "To Dare Death Here". The Bismarck Tribune. 20 May 1937. Retrieved 31 August 2016 – via Newspapers.com. 
  2. ^ a b "Mary Riddle, First Native American Woman Aviator". One of Many Feathers. Retrieved 31 August 2016. 
  3. ^ "Future Beauty Queen: Wins French Crown: To-morrow's Citizen". The Ottawa Journal. 10 June 1930. Retrieved 31 August 2016 – via Newspapers.com. 
  4. ^ "Mary Riddle, First Native American Woman Aviator". www.oneofmanyfeathers.com. Retrieved 2017-03-04. 
  5. ^ "Indian Girl is Full-Fledged Flyer". Rock Valley Bee. 11 July 1930. Retrieved 31 August 2016 – via Newspapers.com. 
  6. ^ a b c Speirs, Jim (28 May 2010). "Tex Rankin’s Flying School, and the Golden Age of Women aviators" (PDF). St. Johns Review. 107 (11): 1. Retrieved 31 August 2016. 
  7. ^ "Pictoral Supplement". The Scranton Republic. 21 June 1930. Retrieved 31 August 2016 – via Newspapers.com. 
  8. ^ "Camera Record of the Day's News". The Evening Review. 15 July 1930. Retrieved 31 August 2016 – via Newspapers.com. 
  9. ^ French, Jack (2011). "Lady Aviators: In History and Popular Fiction from the 1700s to World War II". Winged Victory. Retrieved 31 August 2016. 
  10. ^ "A look back...". The Daily News. 28 April 1977. Retrieved 31 August 2016 – via newspapers.com. 
  11. ^ "A. W. Lucas Co. Sponsoring Spectacular Parachute Jump by Princess Kus-de-cha". The Bismarck Tribune. 21 May 1937. Retrieved 31 August 2016 – via Newspapers.com. 

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