List of former Maryland state highways (700–999)

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List of former Maryland state highways (700–999)
MD Route 701.svgMD Route 999.svg
Highway names
Interstates: Interstate X (I-X)
US Highways: U.S. Route X (US X)
State: Maryland Route X (MD X)
List of former Maryland state highways
System links

The Maryland highway system has several hundred former state highways. These highways were constructed, maintained, or funded by the Maryland State Roads Commission or Maryland State Highway Administration and assigned a unique or temporally unique number. Some time after the highway was assigned, the highway was transferred to county or municipal maintenance and the number designation was removed from the particular stretch of road. In some cases, a highway was renumbered in whole or in part. This list contains all or most of the state-numbered highways between 700 and 999 that have existed since highways were first numbered in 1927 but are no longer part of the state highway system or are state highways of a different number. Most former state highways have not had their numbers reused. However, many state highway numbers were used for a former highway and are currently in use. Some numbers have been used three times. The former highways below whose numbers are used presently, those that were taken over in whole or in part by another highway, or have enough information to warrant a separate article contain links to those separate highway articles. Highway numbers that have two or more former uses are differentiated below by year ranges. This list does not include former Interstate or U.S. Highways, which are linked from their respective lists.


MD 711[edit]

For the current highway, see Maryland Route 711.

Maryland Route 711
Location: Elkton
Length: 0.75 mi[MD 711 1] (1.21 km)
Existed: 1943–1958

Maryland Route 711 was the designation for Dogwood Road, which ran 0.75 miles (1.21 km) from MD 545 east to MD 280 (now MD 213) near Elkton in northeastern Cecil County.[MD 711 1] The highway and a bridge across Dogwood Run were constructed as a wartime access project in 1942 and 1943 to provide better access to the Triumph Explosives plant along MD 545.[MD 711 2][MD 711 3] MD 711 was transferred from state to county maintenance in a road transfer agreement on May 8, 1958.[MD 711 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Excerpt from Minutes of Meeting of the State Roads Commission" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. May 8, 1958. Retrieved July 8, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Whitman, Ezra B.; Webb, P. Watson; Thomas, W. Frank (March 15, 1943). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1941–1942 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 45, 81. Retrieved July 8, 2016. 
  3. ^ Whitman, Ezra B.; Webb, P. Watson; Thomas, W. Frank (March 1, 1945). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1943–1944 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 77. Retrieved July 8, 2016. 

MD 714[edit]

Maryland Route 714
Location: Millington
Length: 0.20 mi[MD 714 1] (0.32 km)
Existed: c. 1957–1987

Maryland Route 714 was the designation for Rivers Edge Road, which ran 0.20 miles (0.32 km) from Rivers Edge West north to MD 291 west of Millington in eastern Kent County.[MD 714 1] The highway was created to re-establish access to the portion of Rivers Edge Road cut off by the construction of what is now US 301 near Millington between 1954 and 1957.[MD 714 2][MD 714 3][MD 714 4] MD 714 was transferred from state to county maintenance through a December 1, 1987, road transfer agreement.[MD 714 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Memorandum of Action of Director Neil J. Pedersen" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Kent County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. January 19, 1988. Retrieved September 23, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: K-188-4-220 (August 25, 1954). Retrieved September 23, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  3. ^ Millington, MD quadrangle (Map) (1953 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 
  4. ^ Millington, MD quadrangle (Map) (1976 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 

MD 787[edit]

Maryland Route 787
Location: Takoma Park
Length: 0.99 mi[MD 787 1] (1.59 km)
Existed: 1956–2012

Maryland Route 787 was the designation for Flower Avenue, which ran 0.99 miles (1.59 km) from MD 195 north to MD 320 within Takoma Park in southeastern Montgomery County.[MD 787 1] Flower Avenue from Carroll Avenue to Piney Branch Road was paved as a concrete road by 1923.[MD 787 2] The pavement was extended from Piney Branch Road north to Franklin Avenue in Silver Spring between 1931 and 1933.[MD 787 3][MD 787 4] Flower Avenue between MD 195 and MD 516 (Franklin Avenue), was designated MD 194 by 1939.[MD 787 5] MD 194 was widened to 30 feet (9.1 m) and resurfaced with asphalt concrete from MD 195 to MD 320 in 1947.[MD 787 6] The highway from MD 320 to MD 516 was resurfaced in 1954.[MD 787 7] In 1955, MD 194 was involved in a route number swap involving three routes in different parts of the state. At the time, MD 71 was assigned to the highway connecting Frederick with Taneytown, which connected with Pennsylvania Route 194 at the Maryland–Pennsylvania state line.[MD 787 8] MD 71 was reassigned to the new Blue Star Memorial Highway on the Eastern Shore; this designation would be replaced with US 301 in 1959.[MD 787 9][MD 787 10] The Frederick–Taneytown highway was assigned MD 194 to match its Pennsylvania counterpart.[MD 787 9] Flower Avenue's designation was changed to MD 787.[MD 787 11]

The portion of MD 787 from MD 320 to Franklin Avenue was transferred from state to county maintenance in 1999. This mileage swap, which included the transfer of MD 516 as well, was conducted to bring MD 119 (Great Seneca Highway) into the state highway system.[MD 787 12] The following year, a short segment of MD 787 south of MD 195 was removed from the state highway system.[MD 787 13] This 0.10-mile (0.16 km) segment, which extended south to Chaney Drive, had already been maintained by the city of Takoma Park.[MD 787 12] Chaney Drive had been where Flower Avenue intersected the Montgomery–Prince George's county line before the county line was moved in 1997 to place Takoma Park entirely within Montgomery County.[MD 787 11][MD 787 14] The remaining state-maintained portion of Flower Avenue functioned as more of a city street than a state highway, and the city of Takoma Park desired to reconstruct it as a "green street" with improved stormwater management and complete sidewalks on both sides of the street. In November 2010, after a series of discussions on several state highways in the city, the Takoma Park city council proposed the city receive ownership of Flower Avenue from the state in exchange for a one-time payment of $696,000, which was the amount the Maryland State Highway Administration had planned to spend to repave MD 787. The city would use the state payment toward reconstructing Flower Avenue after ownership was transferred to the city.[MD 787 15] Flower Avenue from MD 195 to MD 320 was officially transferred from the state to the city of Takoma Park through a road transfer agreement on August 1, 2012.[MD 787 16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2011). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved March 1, 2014. 
  2. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1923). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  3. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1933). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  4. ^ Byron, William D.; Lacy, Robert (December 28, 1934). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1931–1934 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 345. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  5. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1939). General Highway Map: State of Maryland (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  6. ^ Reindollar, Robert M.; George, Joseph M.; McCain, Russell H. (February 15, 1949). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1947–1948 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 19, 114. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  7. ^ McCain, Russell H.; Bennett, Edgar T.; Kelly, Bramwell (November 12, 1954). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1953–1954 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 163, 165. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  8. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1955). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  9. ^ a b Maryland State Roads Commission (1956). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  10. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1959). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  11. ^ a b Washington East, DC quadrangle (Map) (1979 ed.). 1:24,000. 7 1/2 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 
  12. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 1999). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  13. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2000). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  14. ^ "History of Takoma Park". City of Takoma Park. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  15. ^ Myers, Virginia (December 2010). "Crowd Weighs in on Fate of Route 410" (PDF). Takoma Park Newsletter. Takoma Park, MD: City of Takoma Park. pp. 1, 5. Retrieved 2014-01-09. 
  16. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2012). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2014-01-09. 

MD 801[edit]

Maryland Route 801
Location: Galena
Length: 1.05 mi[MD 801 1] (1.69 km)
Existed: 1957–1987

Maryland Route 801 was the designation for Irelands Corner Road, which ran 1.05 miles (1.69 km) between intersections with MD 313 on either side of MD 290 south of Galena in northeastern Kent County.[MD 801 1] The highway was originally paved in two segments. Kent County constructed the first segment, north of MD 290, with state aid as part of the 14-foot-wide (4.3 m) concrete road from Galena south to Lambson Station between 1915 and 1919.[MD 801 2][MD 801 3] The southern segment was built as part of the Galena–Massey highway; the 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) concrete road was constructed in 1921 and 1922.[MD 801 4] MD 801 was assigned to Irelands Corner Road after MD 313 was reconstructed and relocated south from Galena in 1956 and 1957; the segment of MD 290 between MD 801 and MD 313 was constructed at the same time.[MD 801 5] MD 801 was transferred from state to county maintenance through a December 1, 1987, road transfer agreement.[MD 801 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Memorandum of Action of Director Neil J. Pedersen" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Kent County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. January 19, 1988. Retrieved August 18, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Weller, O.E.; Parran, Thomas; Miller, W.B.; Perry, John M.; Ramsay, Andrew; Smith, J. Frank (May 1916). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1912–1915 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 128. Retrieved August 18, 2016. 
  3. ^ Zouck, Frank H.; Uhl, G. Clinton; Mudd, John F. (January 1920). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1916–1919 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 46. Retrieved August 18, 2016. 
  4. ^ Mackall, John N.; Crothers, Omar D.; Winebrener, D.C. (January 1924). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1920–1923 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 44, 89. Retrieved August 18, 2016. 
  5. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Numbers: K-211-1-220 (July 31, 1956), K-211-1-220 (September 18, 1956). Retrieved August 18, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 803[edit]

Maryland Route 803
Location: Warwick
Length: 1.53 mi[MD 803 1] (2.46 km)
Existed: 1955–1979

Maryland Route 803 was the designation for two segments of Edgar Price Road with a total length of 1.53 miles (2.46 km) near Warwick in southern Cecil County. The western segment paralleled the northbound side of US 301 from MD 299 to where it curved southeast from the U.S. Highway, where the county-maintained portion of the road began. The eastern segment of MD 803 began where Edgar Price Road curved northeast. The highway met the southern end of MD 822 before reaching its eastern terminus at the Delaware state line.[MD 803 1] The portion of the county highway west from the state line was reconstructed as the eastern section of MD 803 was reconstructed as a state highway in 1955.[MD 803 2][MD 803 3] The western section was constructed as a service road to reconnect MD 299 with Edgar Price Road, which was cut off by the construction of MD 71 (now US 301) between 1954 and 1956.[MD 803 2][MD 803 3][MD 803 4] MD 803 was transferred to county maintenance through a December 27, 1979, road transfer agreement.[MD 803 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. December 27, 1979. Retrieved August 11, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ a b Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Numbers: CE-356-1-220 (May 28, 1954), CE-356-9-215 (January 21, 1955). Retrieved August 11, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  3. ^ a b Cecilton, MD quadrangle (Map) (1958 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 
  4. ^ Cecilton, MD quadrangle (Map) (1953 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 

MD 809[edit]

Maryland Route 809
Location: Calvert, Fair Hill
Existed: 1958–1979

Maryland Route 809 was the designation for a pair of sections of old alignment of MD 273 at Calvert and near Fair Hill in northern Cecil County.

  • MD 809 was the designation for Brick Meetinghouse Road, which ran 0.91 miles (1.46 km) between junctions with MD 273 on either side of Calvert.[MD 809 1][MD 809 2] The route was created when MD 273 was relocated through Calvert in 1958.[MD 809 3] MD 809 was transferred from state to county maintenance in two sections. The 0.44-mile (0.71 km) segment west of MD 272 was transferred in a February 25, 1976, road transfer agreement; part of this road no longer exists.[MD 809 1] The remaining 0.47-mile (0.76 km) east of MD 272 was transferred by the agreement of December 27, 1979.[MD 809 2]
  • MD 809A was the designation for Stonehouse Lane, which ran 0.32 miles (0.51 km) from a dead end east to MD 273 west of the main route's bridge across Big Elk Creek near Fair Hill.[MD 809 2] The route was created when MD 273 was relocated east of Fair Hill in 1965.[MD 809 3] MD 809A was transferred from state to county maintenance in the December 27, 1979, road transfer agreement.[MD 809 2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Memorandum of Action of Director Robert J. Hajzyk" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. February 25, 1976. Retrieved March 22, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. December 27, 1979. Retrieved March 22, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  3. ^ a b Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Numbers: CE-396-2-220 (September 26, 1956), CE-396-4-220 (September 30, 1963). Retrieved March 22, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 811[edit]

Maryland Route 811
Location: Rising Sun
Length: 0.19 mi[MD 811 1] (0.31 km)
Existed: 1958–1979

Maryland Route 811 was the designation for Wilson Avenue, which ran 0.19 miles (0.31 km) from the south town limit of Rising Sun north to MD 273 within Rising Sun in northern Cecil County.[MD 811 1] The highway was created after the portion of MD 276 between Woodlawn and the town limit of Rising Sun was transferred to county maintenance and MD 276 was placed in its present corridor through a road transfer agreement on May 8, 1958.[MD 811 2] MD 811 was transferred from state to town maintenance in a road transfer agreement on January 5, 1979.[MD 811 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. January 8, 1979. Retrieved March 17, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ "Excerpt from Minutes of Meeting of the State Roads Commission" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. May 8, 1958. Retrieved March 17, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 812[edit]

Maryland Route 812
Location: Singerly
Existed: 1958–1982

Maryland Route 812 was the designation for a pair of sections of old alignment of MD 280 (now MD 213) near Singerly in northeastern Cecil County.[MD 812 1] Both routes were created after MD 280 was relocated north of Singerly between 1956 and 1958.[MD 812 2] Based on a November 20, 1978, road transfer agreement, both segments of MD 812 were transferred from state to county maintenance after the highways were resurfaced with bituminous concrete in May 1982.[MD 812 1][MD 812 3]

  • MD 812 was the designation for Cherry Hill Road, which ran 1.11 miles (1.79 km) from MD 213 south of Molitor Road to MD 213 north of Elk Mills Road.[MD 812 1]
  • MD 812A was the designation for a 0.05-mile (0.080 km) spur from MD 812 to a dead end at the north end of the unsuffixed highway.[MD 812 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. November 20, 1978. Retrieved July 21, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: CE-395-1-220 (August 29, 1956). Retrieved July 18, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  3. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: CE-640-501-277 (May 7, 1982). Retrieved July 21, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 813[edit]

Maryland Route 813
Location: WoodlawnHarrisville
Existed: 1963–1979
For the current highway, see Maryland Route 813.

Maryland Route 813 was the designation for a pair of sections of old alignments of MD 276 between Woodlawn and Harrisville in western Cecil County.[MD 813 1] Both routes were created after MD 276 was relocated between Woodlawn and MD 269 (Liberty Grove Road) south of Harrisville in 1962 and 1963.[MD 813 2] Both segments of MD 813 were transferred from state to county maintenance in a road transfer agreement on December 27, 1979.[MD 813 1]

  • MD 813 was the designation for Sale Barn Road, which ran 0.25 miles (0.40 km) between junctions with MD 276 south of MD 269.[MD 813 1]
  • MD 813A was the designation for Harrisville Road, which ran 2.09 miles (3.36 km) from a dead end south of Liberty Grove Road to MD 273 in Harrisville.[MD 813 1] MD 813A briefly had its northern end at MD 269; the highway was extended north to Harrisville after MD 276 was relocated between MD 269 and MD 273 in 1963 and 1964.[MD 813 2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. December 27, 1979. Retrieved March 17, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ a b Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Numbers: CE-404-2-220 (August 16, 1962), CE-404-5-220 (August 8, 1963). Retrieved March 17, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 822[edit]

Maryland Route 822
Location: Warwick
Length: 0.65 mi[MD 822 1] (1.05 km)
Existed: 1955–1979
For the current highway, see Maryland Route 822.

Maryland Route 822 was the designation for the 0.65-mile-long (1.05 km) section of Joe Meltz Road north from Edgar Price Road, which was then part of MD 803, near Warwick in southern Cecil County.[MD 822 1] The highway was constructed concurrently with MD 803 in 1955.[MD 822 2] MD 822 was transferred to county maintenance through a December 27, 1979, road transfer agreement.[MD 822 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. December 27, 1979. Retrieved August 11, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: CE-356-9-215 (January 21, 1955). Retrieved August 11, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 823[edit]

Maryland Route 823
Location: Elkton
Length: 0.61 mi[MD 823 1] (0.98 km)
Existed: 1962–1979

Maryland Route 823 was the designation for Belle Hill Road, which ran 0.61 miles (0.98 km) from MD 316 east to MD 279 near Elkton in northeastern Cecil County.[MD 823 1] The highway was created after MD 279 was moved to its present course between MD 316 and Belle Hill Road in 1962.[MD 823 2] MD 823 was transferred from state to county maintenance in a road transfer agreement on December 27, 1979.[MD 823 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. December 27, 1979. Retrieved July 8, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: CE-400-8-220 (September 11, 1962). Retrieved July 8, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 835[edit]

Maryland Route 835
Location: Rising Sun
Length: 0.26 mi[MD 835 1] (0.42 km)
Existed: 1953–1958
For the current highway, see Maryland Route 835.

Maryland Route 835 was the designation for a 0.26-mile-long (0.42 km) section of old alignment of US 1 (now MD 273) near Rising Sun in northwestern Cecil County.[MD 835 1] The highway formed a loop on the south side of US 1 west from the western town limit of Rising Sun at Stone Run toward Harrisville.[MD 835 2] MD 835 was assigned to the loop of old alignment after US 1 was reconstructed and straightened west of Rising Sun in 1952 and 1953.[MD 835 2][MD 835 3] The highway was transferred from state to county maintenance through a May 8, 1958, road transfer agreement.[MD 835 1] The loop that comprised MD 835 ceased to exist as a road by 1971.[MD 835 4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Excerpt from Minutes of Meeting of the State Roads Commission" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. May 8, 1958. Retrieved July 22, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ a b Rising Sun, MD quadrangle (Map) (1953 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 
  3. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: CE-330-1-214 (May 8, 1952). Retrieved July 22, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  4. ^ Rising Sun, MD quadrangle (Map) (1971 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 

MD 857[edit]

Maryland Route 857
Location: Still Pond
Length: 0.39 mi[MD 857 1] (0.63 km)
Existed: 1959–1987

Maryland Route 857 was the designation for Medders Road and the portion of Rosedale Cannery Road east of Medders Road, which had a length of 0.39 miles (0.63 km) between intersections with MD 566 in Still Pond in northern Kent County.[MD 857 1] The highway was created in 1959 after MD 566 was moved to its present straighter alignment in Still Pond.[MD 857 2][MD 857 3][MD 857 4][MD 857 5] MD 857 was transferred from state to county maintenance in a December 1, 1987, road transfer agreement.[MD 857 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Memorandum of Action of Director Neil J. Pedersen" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Kent County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. January 19, 1988. Retrieved August 24, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1960). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  3. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1961). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  4. ^ Planning and Programming Division (January 1, 1958). Control Section Listings for the State Maintained Highways, July 1958–July 1959 (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. Kent County, p. 3. Retrieved August 24, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  5. ^ Planning and Programming Division (January 1, 1959). Control Section Listings for the State Maintained Highways, July 1959–July 1960 (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. Kent County, p. 2. Retrieved August 24, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 859[edit]

Maryland Route 859
Location: Chestertown, Morgnec
Existed: 1963–1987

MD 859 was the designation for three stretches of old alignment of MD 291 between Chestertown and Morgnec in central Kent County.

  • MD 859A was the designation for the 0.16-mile-long (0.26 km) section of old alignment of MD 291 on the east side of Morgan Creek.[MD 859 1] The highway was paved as a concrete road and designated MD 447 in 1930.[MD 859 2][MD 859 3][MD 859 4] This section of MD 447 became part of MD 291 in 1963.[MD 859 5] The segment was bypassed and became MD 859A when MD 291's S-curve east of Morgan Creek was made smoother when the highway was reconstructed in 1964.[MD 859 6][MD 859 7] MD 859A was removed from the state highway system in 1967, and the road itself was removed by 1976.[MD 859 1][MD 859 8][MD 859 9]
  • MD 859B was the designation for Morgnec Cutoff Road or Old Morgnec Road from a tangent intersection with MD 291 east 0.88 miles (1.42 km) to a dead end east of Morgnec Cutoff Road at Morgnec.[MD 859 10] The highway west of the intersection of Morgnec Cutoff Road and Old Morgnec Road was built as a concrete road as part of MD 447, which turned north away from the Chester River at Morgnec, between 1930 and 1933.[MD 859 3][MD 859 11][MD 859 4] Old Morgnec Road was a county highway, River Road, from Morgnec toward Millington. The portion of MD 447 through Morgnec and part of the county highway east of MD 447 were bypassed by a westward extension of MD 291 in 1962 and 1963.[MD 859 6] MD 859B was transferred from state to county maintenance through a December 1, 1987. road transfer agreement.[MD 859 10]
  • MD 859C was the designation for Hadaway Drive, which ran 0.30 miles (0.48 km) from MD 213 east to a tangent intersection with MD 291 in Chestertown.[MD 859 1] The highway was originally built as a concrete road as part of MD 447 in 1930.[MD 859 2][MD 859 3][MD 859 4] What is now Hadaway Drive became part of MD 291 in 1963.[MD 859 5] MD 859C was assigned to the highway after MD 291 was relocated during reconstruction of the highway in 1965 and 1966.[MD 859 6] The highway was transferred from state to municipal maintenance through an August 11, 1978, agreement.[MD 859 12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Planning and Programming Division (July 1966). Control Section Listings for the State Maintained Highways, July 1966–July 1967 (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. Kent County, p. 4. Retrieved August 24, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ a b Maryland Geological Survey (1930). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  3. ^ a b c Uhl, G. Clinton; Bruce, Howard; Shaw, John K. (October 1, 1930). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1927–1930 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 218, 219. Retrieved October 2, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Maryland State Roads Commission (1939). General Highway Map: State of Maryland (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  5. ^ a b "Excerpt from Minutes of Meeting of the State Roads Commission" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Kent County. Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. November 29, 1962. Retrieved October 2, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  6. ^ a b c Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Numbers: K-229-1-220 (May 25, 1962), K-229-7-220 (January 23, 1964), K-229-9-241 (October 1, 1965). Retrieved October 2, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  7. ^ Chestertown, MD quadrangle (Map) (1953 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 
  8. ^ Planning and Programming Division (May 1967). Control Section Listings for the State Highway System, July 1967–July 1968 (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. Kent County, p. 4. Retrieved October 2, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  9. ^ Chestertown, MD quadrangle (Map) (1976 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 
  10. ^ a b "Memorandum of Action of Director Neil J. Pedersen" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Kent County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. January 19, 1988. Retrieved October 2, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  11. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1933). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  12. ^ "Memorandum of Action of State Highway Administrator M. S. Caltrider" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Kent County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. August 11, 1978. Retrieved October 2, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 878[edit]

Maryland Route 878
Location: Hagerstown
Length: 0.10 mi[MD 878 1] (0.16 km)

Maryland Route 878 was the unnamed designation for a 0.10-mile (0.16 km) service road spur from Broadfording Road west to a dead end immediately southeast of MD 58's interchange with I-81 in Hagerstown.[MD 878 1] The route was removed from the state highway system in 2015 and transferred to the city of Hagerstown.[MD 878 2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2014). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  2. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2015). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 

MD 880[edit]

Maryland Route 880
Location: Buckeystown
Length: 1.17 mi[MD 880 1] (1.88 km)
Existed: 1975–2008

Maryland Route 880 was the designation for Michaels Mill Road, a 1.17-mile (1.88 km) route that ran from MD 85 east to MD 80 in Buckeystown, Frederick County.[MD 880 1] MD 880 was designated in 1975 on the former alignment of MD 80 after that route was shifted south to a new alignment.[MD 880 2] On November 18, 2008, MD 880 was removed from the state highway system and transferred to Frederick County.[MD 880 3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2007). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2016-09-04. 
  2. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1975). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1975–76 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  3. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2008). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2016-09-04. 

MD 912[edit]

Maryland Route 912
Location: Earleville
Existed: 1967–1979

Maryland Route 912 was the designation for a pair of highways near Earleville in southern Cecil County.

  • MD 912 was the designation for an L-shaped 0.09-mile-long (0.14 km) highway along segments of Peddlers Lane in Earleville.
  • MD 912A was the designation for Old Crystal Beach Road, which ran 0.56 miles (0.90 km) between a pair of intersections with MD 282 on either side of Glebe Road north of Earleville.[MD 912 1]

Both highways were originally part of MD 283, which was paved as a concrete road on the north side of Earleville in 1928.[MD 912 2][MD 912 3] MD 912 was assigned to the L-shaped part of Peddlers Lane after MD 282 was reconstructed and relocated from Cecilton to north of Earleville in 1966 and 1967; MD 282 had previously had a right-angle turn at Peddlers Lane. MD 912A was bypassed when MD 282 was relocated north of Earleville in 1967 and 1968; MD 282 had previously turned at a four-way intersection with Grove Neck Road and Sandy Bottom Road.[MD 912 4][MD 912 5] MD 912 and MD 912A were transferred to county maintenance through a December 27, 1979, road transfer agreement.[MD 912 1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Memorandum of Action of Director Hal Kassoff" (PDF). S.R.C. Minutes District No. 2 Cecil County. Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. December 27, 1979. Retrieved August 10, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1928). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  3. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1939). General Highway Map: State of Maryland (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  4. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Numbers: CE-452-1-241 (May 2, 1966), CE-452-4-271 (June 2, 1967). Retrieved August 10, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  5. ^ Earleville, MD quadrangle (Map) (1959 ed.). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 14, 2017. 

MD 913[edit]

Maryland Route 913
Location: Charlestown
Length: 0.19 mi[MD 913 1] (0.31 km)
Existed: 1968–1974

Maryland Route 913 was the designation for the 0.19-mile-long (0.31 km) piece of old MD 267 at its former railroad crossing of the Pennsylvania Railroad (now Amtrak Northeast Corridor) on the west side of Charlestown in western Cecil County.[MD 913 1] The highway was assigned in 1968 after MD 267 was relocated over a new bridge at the site called Weber's Bridge.[MD 913 1][MD 913 2][MD 913 3] MD 913 was removed from the state highway system in 1974.[MD 913 4][MD 913 5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bureau of Highway Statistics (July 1968). Control Section Listings for the State Highway System (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. Cecil County, p. 7. Retrieved August 13, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  2. ^ Bureau of Highway Statistics (May 1967). Interstate, U.S., and State Numbered Highways in Numerical Sequence and Assigned Control Section Numbers (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. Retrieved August 13, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  3. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: CE-422-1-241 (March 28, 1966). Retrieved March 23, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  4. ^ Bureau of Highway Statistics (June 1974). Control Section Listings for the State Highway System (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Cecil County, p. 1. Retrieved August 13, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 
  5. ^ Bureau of Highway Statistics (January 1, 1975). Highway Location Reference File, Volume 1 (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Cecil County, p. 27. Retrieved August 13, 2016 – via Maryland State Archives. 

MD 987[edit]

Maryland Route 987
Location: Ellicott City
Existed: 1950–1993

Maryland Route 987 was the designation for Old Columbia Pike, which ran from US 29 just south of MD 103 north to Main Street in Ellicott City in northeastern Howard County.[MD 987 1] The highway was originally built as the northern end of the Ellicott and Clarksville Turnpike in the 19th century.[MD 987 2] The old turnpike was reconstructed as a 14-foot-wide (4.3 m) macadam road in 1918.[MD 987 3] In 1927, the highway became part of the original MD 27, which was replaced by US 29 in 1934.[MD 987 4][MD 987 5] MD 987 was assigned to old Columbia Pike after US 29 was moved to its current course from south of MD 103 to US 40 in 1951.[MD 987 6] The portion of the highway north of MD 103 was removed from the state highway system in 1987.[MD 987 7] The very short piece south of MD 103 remained until the construction of the US 29–MD 100 interchange in 1993.[MD 987 7][MD 987 8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1985). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1985–86 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  2. ^ Clark, William Bullock (1899). Report on the Highways of Maryland. Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. p. 239. Retrieved March 2, 2014. 
  3. ^ Zouck, Frank H.; Uhl, G. Clinton; Mudd, John F. (January 1920). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1916–1919 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 26, 27. Retrieved March 2, 2014. 
  4. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1927). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  5. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1934). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  6. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1951). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  7. ^ a b Maryland State Highway Administration (1987). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  8. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1993). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 

MD 999[edit]

Maryland Route 999
Location: Glen Burnie
Length: 0.24 mi[MD 999 1] (0.39 km)
Existed: 2001–2002

Maryland Route 999 (officially MD 999D) was the designation for Old Hammonds Ferry Road, which ran 0.24 miles (0.39 km) from Stewart Avenue north to a cul-de-sac adjacent to MD 176 between that route's junctions with MD 162 and I-97 near Glen Burnie. MD 999D was created in a road transfer from Anne Arundel County to the state in 2001.[MD 999 1] The highway was transferred back to county maintenance in 2002.[MD 999 2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2001). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved March 2, 2014. 
  2. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2002). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved March 2, 2014. 

See also[edit]