Maryland Route 90

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This article is about the current Maryland Route 90. For the former highway, see Maryland Route 90 (former).
"MD 90" redirects here. For the aircraft, see McDonnell Douglas MD-90.

Maryland Route 90 marker

Maryland Route 90
Ocean City Expressway
A map of northern Worcester County showing major roads.  Maryland Route 90 runs from US 50 near Whaleyville to the northern part of Ocean City.
Maryland Route 90 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length: 11.83 mi[1] (19.04 km)
Existed: 1971 – present
Major junctions
West end: US 50 near Whaleyville
 

US 113 in Friendship

MD 589 in Ocean Pines
East end: MD 528 in Ocean City
Location
Counties: Worcester
Highway system
MD 89 MD 91

Maryland Route 90 (MD 90) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Maryland. Known as the Ocean City Expressway, the state highway runs 11.83 miles (19.04 km) from U.S. Route 50 (US 50) near Whaleyville to MD 528 in Ocean City. MD 90 is a two-lane expressway that provides one of the main access routes to Ocean City, especially the northern part of the resort, and thus sees heavy seasonal traffic. The highway was constructed from Ocean City starting in 1970. The state highway was opened west to MD 589 in 1972 and to US 113 in 1975. MD 90 was completed west to US 50 in 1976.

Route description[edit]

MD 90 begins at a partial directional interchange with US 50 (Ocean Gateway) east of Whaleyville. There is no access from westbound MD 90 to eastbound US 50 or from westbound US 50 to eastbound MD 90. MD 90 heads east as a two-lane undivided freeway with rumble strips within the painted median. Headlight use is required at all times. After passing under MD 346 (Old Ocean City Boulevard) with no access, the state highway crosses over Church Branch. MD 90 crosses over the Snow Hill Line of the Maryland and Delaware Railroad before reaching a partial cloverleaf interchange with US 113 (Worcester Highway). After passing over MD 575 (Worcester Highway), the old alignment of US 113, with no access, the state highway becomes divided with a narrow guardrail median barrier.[1][2]

MD 90 continues east through Ocean Pines, where the highway has a diamond interchange with MD 589 (Racetrack Road) and passes over Ocean Parkway within that community. The median barrier ends and the state highway becomes an undivided highway again immediately before crossing the St. Martin River on a long bridge. A median returns right after the bridge ends at Isle of Wight, where MD 90 has an at-grade signalized intersection with St. Martins Neck Road and the entrance to Isle of Wight Nature Park. MD 90 becomes undivided again for the Assawoman Bay Bridge over Assawoman Bay. After that bridge, the state highway expands to four lanes with a Jersey barrier for a short distance before its terminal intersection with MD 528 (Coastal Highway) at 62nd Street in Ocean City.[1][2]

MD 90 serves as an access route to the northern part of Ocean City and sees heavy traffic in the summer months.[3][4] The route is also designated as a hurricane evacuation route out of Ocean City in which contraflow lane reversal can be used for a quicker evacuation.[5][6] MD 90 is a part of the main National Highway System for its entire length.[7]

History[edit]

MD 90 westbound past eastern terminus at MD 528 in Ocean City

Construction on MD 90 began in 1970 with the construction of the bridges over the St. Martin River and Assawoman Bay, which were completed in 1970 and 1971, respectively.[8][9][10] The state highway was completed and opened between MD 528 and MD 589 in 1972.[11] Construction west to US 113 commenced in 1973 and west to US 50 in 1974.[12][13][14][15] MD 90 was extended west to US 113, which at the time followed today's MD 575, in 1975.[16] The state highway was completed when the highway opened between US 50 and US 113 in 1976.[17][18] MD 90's present interchange with US 113 was constructed in 1976.[19] However, the interchange remained unused until US 113 was relocated as a four-lane divided highway from Berlin north past MD 90 in 2000.[20][21][22] The interchange ramp with MD 575 was closed and removed shortly after the new interchange opened.[21] Mayor Rick Meehan of Ocean City is currently pushing for dualization of the MD 90 bridge, stating that it "is the quicker way in and out of town, especially if you look at all the development that has taken place along the Route 50 corridor." He also stated that dualization is good for the route for evacuation purposes.[23]

Junction list[edit]

The entire route is in Worcester County.

Location mi
[1]
km Destinations Notes
Whaleyville 0.00 0.00 US 50 west (Ocean Gateway) – Salisbury, Bay Bridge Western terminus; eastbound exit from and westbound entrance to US 50
Friendship 4.03 6.49 US 113 (Worcester Highway) – Berlin, Snow Hill, Dover Partial cloverleaf interchange
Ocean Pines 6.01 9.67 MD 589 (Racetrack Road) – Ocean Pines Diamond interchange
St. Martin River 8.42–
9.21
13.55–
14.82
St. Martin's River Bridge
9.47 15.24 St. Martins Neck Road north – Bishopville At-grade signalized intersection
Assawoman Bay 9.94–
11.38
16.00–
18.31
Assawoman Bay Bridge
Ocean City 11.83 19.04 MD 528 (Coastal Highway) / 62nd Street east Eastern terminus; at-grade signalized intersection
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2013). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved September 20, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Google (April 9, 2010). "Maryland Route 90" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 9, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Delmarva Questions and Answers". The Washington Post. May 19, 2006. Retrieved April 2, 2017. 
  4. ^ Thomson, Robert (May 21, 2016). "Summer getaways are all about timing". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 23, 2017. 
  5. ^ Theobald, Joseph. "Hurricane Preparedness Information". Town of Ocean City, Maryland. Retrieved March 23, 2017. 
  6. ^ Shekhar, S.; Xiong, H. (2008). Encyclopedia of GIS. Springer. p. 169. ISBN 9780387308586. Retrieved June 22, 2015. 
  7. ^ National Highway System: Maryland (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. October 1, 2012. Retrieved October 30, 2012. 
  8. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1970). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  9. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000230020010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  10. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000230021010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  11. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1972). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  12. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1973). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  13. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000230026010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  14. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1974). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  15. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000230028010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  16. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1975). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1975–76 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  17. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000230031010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  18. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1977). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  19. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000230032010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  20. ^ 5 km SW of Ocean Pines, Maryland, United States (Map). Aerial Map. United States Geological Survey. 1989-04-12. Retrieved April 9, 2010. 
  21. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2000). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved September 20, 2010. 
  22. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (2002). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  23. ^ Russo, Bryan (October 30, 2009). "Mayor Seeks Route 90 Dualization". The Maryland Coast Dispatch. Ocean City, MD: J. Steven Green. Retrieved February 22, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

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