Maryland gubernatorial election, 2014

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Maryland gubernatorial election, 2014

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  Larry-Hogan.JPG Anthony G. Brown Official State Photo.jpg
Nominee Larry Hogan Anthony G. Brown
Party Republican Democratic
Running mate Boyd Rutherford Kenneth Ulman
Popular vote 884,400 818,890
Percentage 51.0% 47.2%

Maryland Governor Election Results by County, 2014.svg
County results
Brown:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Hogan:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

Governor before election

Martin O'Malley
Democratic

Elected Governor

Larry Hogan
Republican

The 2014 Maryland gubernatorial election took place on November 4, 2014, to elect the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Maryland. Incumbent Democratic Governor Martin O'Malley was term-limited and could not run for reelection to a third consecutive term.

Gubernatorial candidates pick their running mates, with the two then running together on the same ticket. Primary elections were held on June 24, 2014. The Democrats nominated incumbent Lieutenant Governor Anthony G. Brown and Howard County Executive Kenneth Ulman, while the Republicans nominated former State Secretary of Appointments Larry Hogan and former State Secretary of General Services and former Assistant U.S. Secretary of Agriculture for Administration Boyd Rutherford.

Brown predicted that winning the general election would be just "a little bit of a molehill",[1] but he lost to Hogan by a margin of 65,510 votes in the Democratic-leaning state.[2] The Washington Post called the result "a stunning upset" and Republican Governors Association Chairman Chris Christie called it "the biggest upset in the entire country."[3]

Background[edit]

Only one Republican had been elected Governor of Maryland in the last forty-eight years: Bob Ehrlich, in 2002. He was defeated for re-election in 2006 by Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and lost a re-match with O'Malley in 2010.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

  • Ralph Jaffe, teacher and perennial candidate[8]
  • Running mate: Freda Jaffe, sister of Ralph Jaffe[8]
  • Charles U. Smith, perennial candidate[11]
  • Running mate: Clarence Tucker[11]
  • Cindy Walsh, blogger[12]
  • Running mate: Mary Elizabeth Wingate-Pennacchia

Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Anthony G. Brown/Kenneth Ulman

National leaders

Federal legislators

State-level politicians

State legislators

Local elected officials

  • Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Mayor of Baltimore[25]
  • Vicki Almond, Baltimore County Council[26]
  • Angela Alsobrooks, Prince George's State's Attorney[26]
  • Vernon Archer, Mayor of Riverdale Park, Maryland
  • Chris Barclay, President, Montgomery County Board of Education[26]
  • Cathy Bevins, Baltimore County Council[26]
  • Warren M. Branch, Baltimore City Council[26]
  • Dario J. Broccolino, Howard County State's Attorney
  • William H. Cole IV, Baltimore City Council
  • Reuben Collins, Vice President, Charles County Board of Commissioners[26]
  • Sheriff Rex Coffey, Charles County[26]
  • Robert W. Curran, Baltimore City Council
  • Debra M. Davis, Charles County Commissioner
  • Derrick Leon Davis, Prince George's County Council Member[26]
  • Jake Day, City Council President of Salisbury
  • Peter Fosselman, Mayor of Kensington
  • Sheila Finlayson, Alderwoman of Annapolis[26]
  • Mel Franklin, Prince George's County Council Chair[26]
  • Tracey Furman, Kensington Town Council
  • Bob Gell, President of Charlestown (Cecil County)
  • Brian K. Grim, Mayor of Cumberland
  • Andrea C. Harrison, Prince George's County Council[26]
  • Melvin C. High, Prince George's County Sheriff[26]
  • Dr. Classie G. Hoyle, Alderwoman of Annapolis
  • Helen Holton, Baltimore City Council[26]
  • Sidney Katz, Mayor of Gaithersburg[26]
  • Candice Quinn Kelly, President, Charles County Board of Commissioners
  • Travis Marion, Rising Sun Commissioner Cecil County[26]
  • Tim Male, Takoma Park Town Council
  • Sharon Middleton, Baltimore City Council
  • Nick Mosby, Baltimore City Council
  • Nancy Navarro, Montgomery County Council[26]
  • Kenneth Oliver, Baltimore County Council[26]
  • Eric C. Olson, Prince George's County Council Member[26]
  • Johnny Olszewski, Sr., Baltimore County Council[26]
  • Ian Pfeiffer, Alderman of Annapolis[26]
  • James Purnell Jr., Worcester County Commissioner
  • Ed Reisinger, Baltimore City Council
  • Hans Riemer, Montgomery County Council[26]
  • Craig Rice, President of Montgomery County Council
  • Kenneth Robinson, Charles County Commissioner[26]
  • Debbie Rowe, Mayor of Marydel (Caroline County)[26]
  • Bobby Rucci, Charles County Commissioner[26]
  • Sheree Sample-Hughes, Wicomico County Council[26]
  • Brandon M. Scott, Baltimore City Council[26]
  • Michael Sesma, Gaithersburg Town Council[26]
  • Paul Sexton, Kensington Town Council[26]
  • Eugenie Shields, Salisbury City Council[26]
  • Jeffrey Slavin, Mayor of Somerset[26]
  • Rochelle "Rikki" Spector, Baltimore City Council[26]
  • Karen R. Toles, Prince George's County Council[26]
  • Ingrid M. Turner, Prince George's County Council[26]
  • Bruce Wahl, Mayor of Chesapeake Beach (Calvert County)[26]
  • William "Pete" Welch, Baltimore City Council[26]
  • Bernard C. Young, Baltimore City Council President[26]

Organizations

Doug Gansler/Jolene Ivey

Federal legislators

State-level politicians

State legislators

Local elected officials

  • Paul N. Crampton Jr., Mayor of Funkstown[40]
  • Todd L. Hershey, Washington County Treasurer[40]
  • Cynthia Kauffman, Boonsboro Councilmember[40]
  • Skip Kauffman, Boonsboro Mayor[40]
  • Howard Long, Boonsboro Assistant Mayor[40]
  • Lewis Metzner, Hagerstown Councilmember[40]
  • Penny Nigh, Hagerstown Councilmember[40]
  • Homer Schetrompf, Hancock Councilmember[40]
  • Donald Souders Jr., Smithsburg Council Vice President
  • Dennis Weaver, Clerk of the Circuit Court for Washington County[40]

Organizations

  • International Association of Fire Fighters Local 1664, AFL-CIO, CLC[40]
Heather Mizeur/Delman Coates

Local elected officials

  • Margo Bailey, Mayor of Chestertown[41]
  • Jason Barnett, Brentwood Councilmember[42]
  • Jesse Christopherson, Mt. Rainier Councilmember[42]
  • Mary Pat Clarke, Baltimore Councilwoman[43]
  • Colleen Clay, former Takoma Park Councilwoman[44]
  • Megan Cook, Easton Town Councilwoman[41]
  • Mary Jane Coolen, Cheverly Councilmember[42]
  • Kay Daniels-Cohen, Takoma Park Councilwoman[44]
  • Liza Fenton, New Carrollton Councilmember[42]
  • Carol Fordonski, former Queen Anne's County Commissioner[41]
  • Wayne Gilchrest, former Republican U.S. Representative for Maryland's 1st congressional district[41]
  • Seth Grimes, Takoma Park Councilman[44]
  • Jennifer Jenkins, Glenarden Councilmember[42]
  • Laura Mitchell, Salisbury City Councilwoman[41]
  • Jennifer Murphy, Brentwood Councilmember[42]
  • Patrick Paschall, Hyattsville Councilmember[42]
  • Kathy Porter, former Mayor of Takoma Park[44]
  • Hank Prensky, former Takoma Park Councilman[44]
  • Don Robinson, former Takoma Park Councilman[44]
  • Harry Sampson, Chesapeake City Councilman[41]
  • Terry Seamens, Takoma Park Councilman[44]
  • Fred Schultz, Takoma Park Councilman[44]
  • Ed Sharp, former Mayor of Takoma Park[44]
  • Jarrett Smith, Takoma Park Councilman[44]
  • Reuben Snipper, former Takoma Park Councilman[44]
  • Shani Warner, Hyattsville Councilmember[42]
  • Bruce Williams, Mayor of Takoma Park[44]
  • Patrick Wojahn, College Park Councilmember[42]
  • Jacqueline Wood-Dodson, Fairmont Heights Councilmember[42]

Civic leaders

  • Delman Coates, Prince George County pastor[43]
  • Sonja Sohn, actress and founder and chief executive of reWIRED for Change[43]

Organizations

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Anthony G.
Brown
Peter
Franchot
Doug
Gansler
Heather
Mizeur
Kenneth
Ulman
Other Undecided
Washington Post June 5–8, 2014 487 ± 5% 46% 23% 16% 16%
Baltimore Sun May 31–June 3, 2014 499 ± 4.4% 41% 20% 15% 15%
WPA Opinion Research** May 6–7, 2014 ? ± ? 34% 20% 7% 3% 40%
St. Mary's College April 10–13, 2014 502 ± ? 27.1% 10.8% 7.7% 54.3%
Washington Post February 13–16, 2014 469 ± 5.5% 34% 15% 8% 43%
Baltimore Sun February 8–12, 2014 500 ± 4.4% 35% 14% 10% 40%
Gonzales Research October 1–14, 2013 403 ± 5% 40.7% 21.1% 5.2% 33%
GarinHartYang* September 11–15, 2013 608 ± 4% 43% 21% 5% 31%
46% 24% 30%
WPA Opinion Research** September 10–11, 2013 ? ± ? 40% 22% 7% 38%
NormingtonPets^ December 3–5, 2012 ? ± 4.4% 22% 13% 8% 4% 53%
GarinHartYang* September 12–13, 2012 504 ± 4.4% 31% 14% 18% 4% 33%
37% 23% 5% 35%
41% 25% 34%
  • ** Internal poll for the Larry Hogan campaign
  • * Internal poll for the Anthony G. Brown campaign
  • ^ Internal poll for the Peter Franchot campaign

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony G. Brown/Kenneth Ulman 249,398 51.41
Democratic Doug Gansler/Jolene Ivey 117,383 24.2
Democratic Heather Mizeur/Delman Coates 104,721 21.59
Democratic Cindy Walsh/Mary Elizabeth Wingate-Pennacchia 6,863 1.41
Democratic Charles U. Smith/Clarence Tucker 3,507 0.72
Democratic Ralph Jaffe/Freda Jaffe 3,221 0.66
Total votes 485,093 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

  • Running mate: Shelley Aloi, banking analyst and former Frederick Alderman[53]
  • Running mate: Boyd Rutherford, former State Secretary of General Services and former Assistant U.S. Secretary of Agriculture for Administration[55]

Disqualified[edit]

  • Brian Vaeth, businessman, retired firefighter and candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2012[58]
  • Running mate: Duane "Shorty" Davis, activist[59]

Withdrew[edit]

Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

David R. Craig/Jeannie Haddaway
Larry Hogan/Boyd Rutherford
Charles Lollar/Kenneth Timmerman

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
David
Craig
Ron
George
Larry
Hogan
Charles
Lollar
Other Undecided
Washington Post June 5–8, 2014 228 ± 7.5% 19% 5% 35% 13% 3% 29%
Baltimore Sun May 31–June 3, 2014 501 ± 4.4% 12% 6% 27% 12% 37%
St. Mary's College April 10–13, 2014 270 ± ? 7.8% 3.8% 16% 3.8% 68.6%
Washington Post February 13–16, 2014 290 ± 7% 13% 4% 17% 10% 1% 57%
Baltimore Sun February 8–12, 2014 499 ± 4.4% 7% 6% 13% 5% 69%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry Hogan/Boyd Rutherford 92,376 42.98
Republican David R. Craig/Jeannie Haddaway 62,639 29.14
Republican Charles Lollar/Kenneth Timmerman 33,292 15.49
Republican Ron George/Shelley Aloi 26,628 12.39
Total votes 214,935 100

General election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Larry Hogan (Republican Party), former State Secretary of Appointments
  • Running mate: Boyd Rutherford, former State Secretary of General Services and former Assistant U.S. Secretary of Agriculture for Administration
  • Running mate: Lorenzo Gaztanaga, perennial candidate

Campaign[edit]

Hogan heavily criticized Brown for his handling of Maryland's health care exchange as a part of the Affordable Care Act, labeling him as "the most incompetent man in Maryland."[73] The Maryland Health Benefit Exchange enrolled less than 4,000 people.[74]

Hogan avoided social issues by promising not to touch the state's abortion or gun control laws.[75] Campaign ads were a significant part of the first debate, culminating in Hogan's call for Brown to "apologize to the women of Maryland for trying to scare them."

Brown pledged no new taxes, no increased taxes, and a look at state spending if elected. Hogan responded by citing Brown/O'Malley's same claim in the 2010 election and how that claim was followed by "40 consecutive tax hikes."[76] Brown said there have been times he's disagreed with O'Malley, like on mortgage reduction.[77] "Brown did not stay to take questions from reporters" and both candidates accused the other of not telling the truth.[78]

Debates[edit]

Three debates were scheduled and occurred during the Maryland Governor's Race.[79]

  • Tuesday Oct 7, 2014: aired 7pm–8pm broadcast on MPT and WJZ CBS 13; replay recap
  • Tuesday Oct 14, 2014: aired 7pm–8pm broadcast on MPT and WBFF Fox 45;
  • Saturday Oct 18, 2014: aired 7pm–8pm broadcast on MPT and WBAL NBC 11[79] replay recap

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[80] Tossup November 3, 2014
Sabato's Crystal Ball[81] Lean D November 3, 2014
Rothenberg Political Report[82] Tilt D November 3, 2014
Real Clear Politics[83] Tossup November 3, 2014

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Anthony G.
Brown (D)
Larry
Hogan (R)
Other Undecided
WPA Opinion Research* October 20–24, 2014 500 ± 3.5% 39% 44% 17%
Gonzales Research October 20–24, 2014 822 ± 3.5% 46% 44% 2%[84] 18%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov October 16–23, 2014 1,086 ± 5% 51% 38% 0% 11%
WPA Opinion Research* October 19–20, 2014 500 ± 4.4% 42% 41% 15%
Gravis Marketing October 6–9, 2014 784 ± 3.5% 46% 43% 11%
Baltimore Sun October 4–8, 2014 800 ± 3.5% 49% 42% 9%
Washington Post October 2–5, 2014 549 LV ± 5% 47% 38% 4%[84] 11%
807 RV ± 4% 44% 31% 6%[84] 19%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov September 20–October 1, 2014 1,096 ± 4% 55% 38% 1% 7%
Gonzales Research September 16–23, 2014 805 ± 3.5% 47% 43% 1%[84] 9%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov August 18–September 2, 2014 1,082 ± 4% 51% 37% 3% 10%
OnMessage, Inc.* August 18–19, 2014 500 ± 4.38 45% 42% 4%[84] 9%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov July 5–24, 2014 1,409 ± ? 52% 39% 2% 6%
Rasmussen Reports July 9–10, 2014 750 ± 4% 48% 35% 7% 10%
Washington Post June 5–8, 2014 962 ± 3.5% 51% 33% 16%
WPA Opinion Research* May 6–7, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 42% 35% 23%
WPA Opinion Research* September 10–11, 2013 ? ± ? 46% 32% 22%
  • * Internal poll for the Larry Hogan campaign

Results[edit]

Maryland gubernatorial election, 2014[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Larry Hogan/Boyd Rutherford 884,400 51.03% +9.23%
Democratic Anthony G. Brown/Kenneth Ulman 818,890 47.25% -9.00%
Libertarian Shawn Quinn/Lorenzo Gaztanaga 25,382 1.46% +0.69%
Write-ins 4,505 0.26%
Majority 65,510 3.78%
Turnout 1,733,177
Republican gain from Democratic Swing +18.23%

By county[edit]

Source:[85]

County Brown Votes Hogan Votes Others Votes Totals
Allegany 22.60% 4,629 75.25% 15,410 2.14% 439 20,478
Anne Arundel 32.16% 58,001 66.10% 119,195 1.74% 3,142 180,338
Baltimore (City) 75.50% 106,213 21.92% 30,845 2.58% 3,628 140,686
Baltimore (County) 38.89% 102,734 59.03% 155,936 2.07% 5,473 264,143
Calvert 29.11% 9,579 69.11% 22,739 1.78% 586 32,904
Caroline 20.97% 1,931 77.58% 7,144 1.44% 133 9,208
Carroll 16.07% 10,349 82.20% 52,951 1.74% 1,119 64,419
Cecil 20.43% 5,467 77.33% 20,699 2.24% 600 26,766
Charles 51.83% 24,601 46.91% 22,268 1.26% 600 47,469
Dorchester 30.51% 3,252 68.26% 7,276 1.24% 132 10,660
Frederick 34.57% 27,682 63.34% 50,715 2.09% 1,675 80,072
Garrett 17.80% 1,634 79.71% 7,319 2.49% 229 9,182
Harford 21.66% 19,814 76.52% 69,986 1.82% 1,660 91,460
Howard 46.68% 49,227 51.54% 54,353 1.78% 1,873 105,453
Kent 33.56% 2,603 64.58% 5,009 1.86% 144 7,756
Montgomery 61.81% 163,694 36.75% 97,312 1.44% 3,813 264,819
Prince George's 84.23% 184,950 14.86% 32,619 0.91% 2,003 219,572
Queen Anne's 19.34% 3,757 79.46% 15,436 1.20% 233 19,426
St. Mary's 25.20% 8,203 72.72% 23,675 2.09% 679 32,557
Somerset 31.86% 2,135 66.38% 4,448 1.16% 78 6,701
Talbot 29.03% 4,420 69.72% 10,616 1.25% 190 15,226
Washington 24.89% 9,661 73.33% 28,469 1.78% 691 38,821
Wicomico 34.07% 8,833 64.30% 16,669 1.63% 422 25,924
Worcester 28.85% 5,521 69.35% 13,271 1.80% 345 19,137

By congressional district[edit]

Hogan won 5 of the state's 8 congressional districts, including 4 that are heavily Democratic in presidential races.[86][data verification needed]

District Hogan Brown Representative
1st 77.96% 20.41% Andy Harris
2nd 56.59% 41.27% Dutch Ruppersberger
3rd 54.99% 42.93% John Sarbanes
4th 33.72% 65.16% Donna Edwards
5th 47.23% 51.31% Steny Hoyer
6th 58.27% 39.85% John Delaney
7th 38.30% 59.58% Elijah Cummings
8th 49.71% 48.70% Chris Van Hollen

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b "Unofficial 2014 Gubernatorial General Election results for Governor / Lt. Governor". Maryland State Board of Elections. November 6, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014. 
  3. ^ John Wagner and Jenna Johnson (5 November 2014). "Republican Larry Hogan wins Md. governor's race in stunning upset". The Washington Post. 
  4. ^ Davis, Aaron C. (May 10, 2013). "Brown launches bid for Maryland governor". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 11, 2013. 
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External links[edit]

Official campaign websites