Marys Peak

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Marys Peak
Marys Peak - Central Oregon Coast Range.jpg
Viewing Marys Peak from the Willamette Valley.
Highest point
Elevation4,101 ft (1,250 m)  NAVD 88[1]
Prominence3,357 ft (1,023 m) [2]
ListingOregon county high points
Coordinates44°30′16″N 123°33′09″W / 44.50435595°N 123.552456264°W / 44.50435595; -123.552456264Coordinates: 44°30′16″N 123°33′09″W / 44.50435595°N 123.552456264°W / 44.50435595; -123.552456264[1]
Geography
LocationBenton County, Oregon, U.S.
Parent range
Topo mapUSGS Lorane
Climbing
Easiest routetrail from Mary's Peak Road

Marys Peak (formerly Mary's Peak and sometimes still spelled this way) is a mountain in Benton County, Oregon, United States, just southwest of Philomath. It is the highest peak in the Oregon Coast Range. It is also the highest point in Benton County,[3] and ranks eleventh in the state for prominence.[4] It may have been named after Mary Lloyd, who came to Oregon in 1845, and was known as the first white woman to cross the Marys River, which has its origin on the mountain,[5] though there are alternate theories about the name.

On a clear day at the top of the peak, facing east, northeast, and southeast, one can see the cities and suburbs of the Willamette Valley, as well as the Cascade Range. To the west, the Pacific Ocean is visible on clear days.

The road to the peak now remains open in the winter. During the 2010–2011 winter, the Forest Service announced that it will leave the gates open to facilitate travel to the summit. The road will not be maintained, so a lifted 4x4 or four wheel chains are required for motor access during the winter months.[6]

View from a meadow atop Marys Peak.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mary". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved 2008-11-01.
  2. ^ "Marys Peak, Oregon". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2008-04-03.
  3. ^ "Oregon County High Points". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2008-11-01.
  4. ^ "Oregon Peaks with 2000 feet of Prominence". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2008-11-01.
  5. ^ Himes, George H. (1905). "The Souvenir of Western Women/Nomenclature of Northwest Mountains" . The Souvenir of Western Women . Anderson & Duniway Company.
  6. ^ "Marys Peak". Siuslaw National Forest, U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved 2013-02-09.

External links[edit]