Mass graves from Soviet mass executions

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Mass graves in the Soviet Union were used for the burial of mass numbers of citizens and foreigners executed by the government of the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin.[1] These mass killings were carried out by the security organisations, such as the NKVD, and reached their peak in the Great Purge of 1937–38.

Following the demise of the USSR in 1991, many of the killing and burial sites were uncovered,[2][3][4] one as recently as 2010.[5]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Documenting the Death Toll: Research into the Mass Murder of Foreigners in Moscow, 1937–38" By Barry McLoughlin, American Historical Association, 1999
  2. ^ "Mass grave found containing Stalin victims" LA Times-Washington Post News Service, July 13, 1997
  3. ^ "Mass grave found at Ukrainian monastery", BBC, July 12, 2002
  4. ^ "Wary of its past, Russia ignores mass grave site", by Fred Weir, The Christian Science Monitor, October 10, 2002
  5. ^ Stalin-era mass grave yields tons of bones Reuters. June 9, 2010
  6. ^ "Ukraine reburies 2,000 victims of Stalin's rule". Reuters. 27 October 2007
  7. ^ (English) Michael Franklin Hamm (1995). Kyiv. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-02585-1. 
  8. ^ Robert Conquest, The Great Terror: A Reassessment: 40th Anniversary Edition, Oxford University Press, USA, 2007. p. 288
  9. ^ "Former Killing Ground Becomes Shrine to Stalin’s Victims" by Sophia Kishkovsky, The New York Times, June 8, 2007
  10. ^ Спецобъект "Монастырь" izvestia.ru.
  11. ^ "Pictorial essay: Death trenches bear witness to Stalin's purges" CNN, July 17, 1997
  12. ^ Hochschild, Adam. "The Secret of a Siberian River Bank". nytimes.com. New York Times. Retrieved 29 April 2016. 
  13. ^ Hiroaki Kuromiya, The Voices of the Dead: Stalin's Great Terror in the 1930s. Yale University Press, December 24, 2007. ISBN 0-300-12389-2 p. 23
  14. ^ Robert Conquest, The Great Terror: A Reassessment: 40th Anniversary Edition, Oxford University Press, USA, 2007. p. 287
  15. ^ More 'red terror' remains found in Russia UPI, July 19, 2010.