Mathcounts historical results

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from MathCounts historical results)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This is a list of historical results in all areas of the National Mathcounts competition.

Countdown Champions[edit]

The champions of the Countdown Round are considered the individual national champions of Mathcounts.

  • 1984: Michael Edwards, Texas
  • 1985: Timothy Kokesh, Oklahoma
  • 1986: Brian David Ewald, Florida
  • 1987: Russell Mann, Tennessee
  • 1988: Andrew Schultz, Illinois
  • 1989: Albert Kurz, Pennsylvania
  • 1990: Brian Jenkins, Arkansas
  • 1991: Jonathan L. Weinstein, Massachusetts
  • 1992: Andrei C. Gnepp, Ohio
  • 1993: Carleton Bosley, Kansas
  • 1994: William O. Engel, Illinois
  • 1995: Richard Reifsnyder, Kentucky
  • 1996: Alexander Schwartz, Pennsylvania
  • 1997: Zhihao (Howard) Liu, Wisconsin
  • 1998: Ricky Liu, Massachusetts
  • 1999: Po-Ru Loh, Wisconsin
  • 2000: Ruozhou (Joe) Jia, Illinois
  • 2001: Ryan Ko, New Jersey
  • 2002: Albert Ni, Illinois
  • 2003: Adam Hesterberg, Washington
  • 2004: Gregory Gauthier, Illinois
  • 2005: Neal Wu, Louisiana
  • 2006: Daesun Yim, New Jersey
  • 2007: Kevin Chen, Texas
  • 2008: Darryl Wu, Washington
  • 2009: Bobby Shen, Texas
  • 2010: Mark Sellke, Indiana
  • 2011: Scott Wu, Louisiana
  • 2012: Chad Qian, Indiana
  • 2013: Alec Sun, Massachusetts
  • 2014: Swapnil Garg, California
  • 2015: Kevin Liu, Indiana
  • 2016: Edward Wan, Washington
  • 2017: Luke Robitaille, Texas
  • 2018: Luke Robitaille, Texas

Written Test Champions[edit]

The written test determines who makes it into the Countdown round. Each year, the highest score on the written test (the Sprint and Target Rounds) determines the Written Champion.

  • 1989: Lenny Ng, North Carolina
  • 1990: Mathew Crawford (Alabama), Daniel Schepler (Ohio), Ravi Shanmugan (Kansas)
  • 1991: Jonathan L. Weinstein, Massachusetts
  • 1992: Jenny Hoffman (Connecticut), Andrei Gnepp (Ohio), Chris Chang (California)
  • 1993: Davesh Maulik, Kansas
  • 1994: Michael Shulman, California
  • 1995: Richard Reifsnyder, Kentucky
  • 1996: Alexander Schwartz, Pennsylvania
  • 1999: Po-Ru Loh, Wisconsin
  • 2000: Tiankai Liu, California
  • 2001: Ryan Ko, New Jersey
  • 2002: Conner Rogers, Colorado
  • 2003: Adam Hesterberg, Washington
  • 2004: Gregory Gauthier, Illinois
  • 2005: Sergei Bernstein, Massachusetts
  • 2006: Neal Wu, Louisiana
  • 2007: Justin Ahmann, Indiana
  • 2008: Bobby Shen, Texas
  • 2009: David Yang, California
  • 2010: Mark Sellke, Indiana
  • 2011: Shyam Narayanan, Kansas
  • 2012: Sean Shi, California
  • 2013: Alec Sun, Massachusetts
  • 2014: Kevin Liu, Indiana
  • 2015: Andy Xu, South Carolina
  • 2016: Edward Wan, Washington
  • 2017: Luke Robitaille, Texas
  • 2018: Luke Robitaille, Texas

Masters Round Champions[edit]

The Masters Round is a part of the competition in which Mathletes are asked to solve and present a solution to a complex problem. The Masters Round has been discontinued as of the 2012 National Competition due to the Reel Math Challenge, which has now been renamed to the Math Video Challenge.

  • 1987: Ashley Reiter (Ahlin), North Carolina
  • 1990: Brian Jenkins, Arkansas
  • 1991: Chris Chang, New Jersey
  • 1992: Andrei Gnepp, Ohio
  • 1993: Davesh Maulik, Kansas
  • 1994: Kevin Lacker, Ohio
  • 1999: Po-Ru Loh, Wisconsin
  • 2000: Tiankai Liu, California
  • 2001: Po-Ling Loh, Wisconsin
  • 2002: Jason Trigg, Pennsylvania
  • 2003: Brian Lawrence, Maryland
  • 2004: Gregory Gauthier, Illinois
  • 2005: Sergei Bernstein, Massachusetts
  • 2006: Daniel Li, Virginia
  • 2007: Kevin Chen, Texas
  • 2008: Bobby Shen, Texas
  • 2009: Maximilian Schindler, Missouri
  • 2010: Zhuo Qun (Alex) Song, Michigan
  • 2011: Yang Liu, Missouri

Team Rankings[edit]

Each state team of four individuals is ranked by the sum of twice their Team Round score plus the average of their individual scores.

Year 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place 4th Place 5th Place 6th Place 7th Place 8th Place 9th Place 10th Place
2014[1] California Maryland Virginia New York Pennsylvania Indiana Texas Massachusetts Florida Colorado
2015[2] Indiana Maryland Massachusetts New Jersey Washington Virginia Texas New York Michigan California
2016[3] Texas California Washington New Jersey Massachusetts North Carolina Indiana Virginia Ohio Michigan
2017[4] Texas New Jersey California Georgia Michigan Illinois Oregon Massachusetts Florida Washington

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2014 Final Standings Document" (PDF). MATHCOUNTS. May 9, 2014. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  2. ^ "2015 Final Standings Document" (PDF). MATHCOUNTS. May 8, 2015. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  3. ^ "2016 Final Standings Document" (PDF). MATHCOUNTS. May 9, 2016. Retrieved March 22, 2018. 
  4. ^ "2017 Final Standings Document" (PDF). MATHCOUNTS. May 15, 2017. Retrieved March 22, 2018.