Mathew Hayman

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Mathew Hayman
Blankenberge - Eurométropole Tour, étape 3, 4 octobre 2014, départ (A35).JPG
Hayman at the 2014 Tour de l'Eurométropole
Personal information
Full name Mathew Hayman
Nickname Mat
Matty
Born (1978-04-20) 20 April 1978 (age 40)
Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
Height 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)
Weight 78 kg (172 lb)
Team information
Current team Mitchelton–Scott
Discipline Road
Role Rider
Rider type Super-Domestique
Road Captain
Classics specialist
Professional team(s)
2000–2009 Rabobank
2010–2013 Team Sky
2014– Mitchelton–Scott
Major wins

One-Day Races and Classics

Paris–Roubaix (2016)

Mathew Hayman (born 20 April 1978) is an Australian professional road bicycle racer for UCI ProTeam Mitchelton–Scott.[1] Hayman is an experienced and respected domestique, as he typically takes on a supporting role within his team. Hayman is a specialist in the cobbled classics.

Personal life[edit]

Hayman was born in western Sydney, but the family was living near Goulburn in country New South Wales when he became interested in cycling, largely due to his older brother.[2] He started racing in Canberra, and, following his brother, moved to Europe to further a potential cycling career in 1997. He raced as an amateur with Rabobank's under-23 team, based in The Netherlands.[3] In 2006 he married Kym Shirley, an Australian professional cyclist. The couple has a son, born in 2011, and twins born in 2017.

Career[edit]

Hayman turned pro in 2000 with Rabobank, after three years racing as an amateur in Europe. He completed his first Paris-Roubaix the same year. He stayed with Rabobank for ten years, achieving a number of good results during that time. Riding for Australia in the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne as a domestique in support of Allan Davis, it was Hayman who came away with the gold medal in the road race.

At the end of 2009 Hayman left Rabobank for the challenge of helping to form a new pro cycling team, then known as Sky Professional Cycling. Hayman left Team Sky at the end of the 2013 season,[4] and joined Orica–GreenEDGE for the 2014 season.[1]

On 10 April 2016, he won Paris–Roubaix, the eighth professional victory of his career. He was part of a breakaway of 16 riders that escaped from the peloton in the early stages of the race, which was later joined by a group which was formed after the peloton broke up following a crash 115 km from the finish. In the closing stages Hayman managed to close the gap on a select group of riders attacking from the lead group, and in the final sprint at Roubaix Velodrome, he beat Tom Boonen, Ian Stannard, Sep Vanmarcke and Edvald Boasson Hagen. His first reaction was one of disbelief: "I can’t believe it [...] This is my favorite race, it’s a race I dream of every year. This year I didn’t even dare to dream."[5]

On 18 September 2018 Hayman announced that he intends to retire after the 2019 Tour Down Under.[6]

Major results[edit]

1996
2nd Silver medal blank.svg Time trial, UCI Road World Junior Road Championships
2nd Time trial, National Junior Road Championships
1999
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Le Triptyque des Monts et Châteaux
2nd Overall Olympia's Tour
1st Stage 3b (TTT)
3rd Omloop der Kempen
2000
5th Overall Sparkassen Giro Bochum
6th Overall Guldensporentweedaagse
2001
1st Trofeo Soller
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Challenge Mallorca
1st Jersey green.svg Sprints classification
1st Stage 5
6th Overall Circuit Franco-Belge
7th Milano–Torino
2002
6th Henk Vos Memorial
9th Overall Ster Elektrotoer
10th Overall Circuit Franco-Belge
2003
10th Gent–Wevelgem
2004
4th Tour de Rijke
10th Overall Sachsen Tour
10th Schaal Sels-Merksem
2005
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Sachsen Tour
8th Overall Three Days of De Panne
8th Overall Circuit Franco-Belge
8th Dwars door Vlaanderen
10th Trofeo Calvia
2006
1st Gold medal blank.svg Road race, Commonwealth Games
2nd Profronde van Fryslan
3rd Overall Oddset-Rundfahrt
2007
4th Dwars door Vlaanderen
5th Tour de Rijke
7th Profronde van Fryslan
9th Overall Tour of Qatar
2008
10th Ronde van het Groene Hart
2009
4th Gent–Wevelgem
7th Trofeo Inca
8th Dwars door Vlaanderen
8th Memorial Rik Van Steenbergen
10th Tour de Rijke
2010
5th Dwars door Vlaanderen
2011
1st Paris–Bourges
3rd Omloop Het Nieuwsblad
4th Dwars door Vlaanderen
6th Overall Circuit Franco-Belge
10th Paris–Roubaix
2012
8th Paris-Roubaix
2013
3rd Dwars door Vlaanderen
2016
1st Paris–Roubaix

Grand Tour results timeline[edit]

Grand Tour general classification results timeline[7]
Grand Tour 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Jersey pink.svg Giro d'Italia 91 136 DNF 105
Jersey yellow.svg Tour de France DNF 135 151 108
Jersey red.svg Vuelta a España 137 DNF 130

Classics & Monuments results timelines[edit]

Classics results timeline
Classic 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Omloop Het Nieuwsblad DNF 22 DNF 32 22 15 60 27 100 3 24 DNF 50 DNF
Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne 63 45 27 25 20 93 26 46 92 66 33
Dwars door Vlaanderen 26 36 60 8 4 46 8 5 4 55 27 100
E3 Harelbeke 36 22 DNF DNF 28 DNF 74 37 47
Gent–Wevelgem 40 50 41 10 25 80 4 27 125 68 36 18 98 97
Scheldeprijs 17 92 153 31 38 107
Amstel Gold Race 82 96 108 90 DNF DNF 84 124
La Flèche Wallonne 144
Paris–Tours 58 82 40 36 14 89 119 12 131
Milano–Torino 7 125 99
Monuments results timeline
Monument 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Milan–San Remo 154 121 86 93 129 DNF DNF 62 137
Tour of Flanders 70 82 47 90 68 60 13 21 79 DNF 51 39 91 83
Paris–Roubaix 65 49 HD 26 78 23 113 21 24 10 8 52 51 76 1 11 22
Liège–Bastogne–Liège 141
Giro di Lombardia
Legend
Did not compete
HD Hors delai (out of time limit)
DNF Did not finish

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Hayman transfers to Orica for 2014–15; Plaza, Lastras extend with Movistar". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. 21 August 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2013. 
  2. ^ McDonald, Cindy. "The long road: Mathew Hayman, 39, cyclist". The Saturday Paper. Schwartz Media. Retrieved 18 May 2018. 
  3. ^ "Mathew Hayman: The Aussie Hardman". Peloton Magazine. Move Press. Retrieved 18 May 2018. 
  4. ^ "Sky Procycling (SKY) – GBR". UCI World Tour. Union Cycliste Internationale. Retrieved 14 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "Hayman wins Paris-Roubaix". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. 10 April 2016. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  6. ^ Hayman, Mathew. "Mathew Hayman: The time has come..." GreenEDGE Cycling. Retrieved 18 September 2018. 
  7. ^ http://www.procyclingstats.com/rider.php?id=140516&season=2017

External links[edit]