Matsue Domain

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Matsue Domain (松江藩 Matsue-han?) was a Japanese domain of the Edo period. It was associated with Izumo Province in modern-day Shimane Prefecture.[1]

In the han system, Matsue was a political and economic abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[2] In other words, the domain was defined in terms of kokudaka, not land area.[3] This was different from the feudalism of the West.

History[edit]

Matsue Castle

The domain was controlled from what is now Matsue Castle in Matsue, Shimane.

List of daimyo[edit]

The hereditary daimyo were head of the clan and head of the domain.

  1. Horio Yoshiharu[4]
  2. Horio Tadauji
  3. Horio Tadaharu[4]
  1. Kyōgoku Tadataka[5]
  1. Matsudaira Naomasa
  2. Matsudaira Tsunataka[7]
  3. Matsudaira Tsunachika
  4. Matsudaira Yoshitō
  5. Matsudaira Nobuzumi
  6. Matsudaira Munenobu
  7. Matsudaira Harusato
  8. Matsudaira Naritsune
  9. Matsudaira Naritoki
  10. Matsudaira Sadayasu

Genealogy[edit]

  • Simple gold crown.svg Tokugawa Ieyasu, 1st Tokugawa Shōgun (1543-1616; r. 1603-1605)
    • Yūki Hideyasu, 1st Lord of Fukui (1574-1607)
      • Simple silver crown.svg I. Matsudaira Naomasa, 1st Lord of Matsue (cr. 1638) (1601-1666; r. 1638-1666)
        • Simple silver crown.svg II. Tsunataka, 2nd Lord of Matsue (1631-1675; r. 1666-1675)
          • Simple silver crown.svg III. Tsunachika, 3rd Lord of Matsue (1659-1709; r. 1675-1704)
          • Simple silver crown.svg IV. Yoshitō, 4th Lord of Matsue (1668-1705; r. 1704-1705)
            • Simple silver crown.svg V. Nobuzumi, 5th Lord of Matsue (1698-1731; r. 1705-1731)
              • Simple silver crown.svg VI. Munenobu, 6th Lord of Matsue (1729-1782; r. 1731-1767)
                • Simple silver crown.svg VII. Harusatō, 7th Lord of Matsue (1751-1818; r. 1767-1806)
                  • Simple silver crown.svg VIII. Naritsune, 8th Lord of Matsue (1791-1822; r. 1806-1822)
                    • Simple silver crown.svg IX. Naritoki, 9th Lord of Matsue (1815-1863; r. 1822-1853)
        • Chikayoshi, 1st Lord of Hirose (1632-1717)
          • Chikatoki 2nd Lord of Hirose (1659-1702)
            • Chikatomo, 3rd Lord of Hirose (1681-1728)
              • Nagataka, 4th Lord of Tsuyama (1725-1762)
                • Yasuchika, 5th Lord of Tsuyama (1752-1794)
                  • Naritaka, 7th Lord of Tsuyama (1788-1838)
                    • Simple silver crown.svg X. Sadayasu, 10th Lord of Matsue (1855-1882; Lord: 1853-1869; Governor: 1869-1871)
                      • Naoaki, 11th family head, 1st Count (1865-1940; 11th family head: 1882-1940; Count: cr. 1884)
                        • Tadakuni, 12th family head, 2nd Count (1902-1988; 12th family head: 1940-1988; 2nd Count: 1940-1947)
                          • Tadakoto, 13th family head (b. 1925; 13th family head: 1988-)
                            • Naotada (b. 1966)

[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Map of Japan, 1789 -- the Han system affected cartography
  1. ^ "Izumo Province" at JapaneseCastleExplorer.com; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  2. ^ Mass, Jeffrey P. and William B. Hauser. (1987). The Bakufu in Japanese History, p. 150.
  3. ^ Elison, George and Bardwell L. Smith (1987). Warlords, Artists, & Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century, p. 18.
  4. ^ a b c Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Horio" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 11; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  5. ^ a b Papinot, (2003). "Kyōgoku" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 27; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  6. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Matsudaira" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 30; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  7. ^ Borton, Hugh. "Peasant uprisings in Japan of the Tokugawa period," Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan (1938), p. 46 n31.
  8. ^ Genealogy (jp)

External links[edit]