Matt Rosendale

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Matt Rosendale
Matt Rosendale 117th U.S Congress.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana's at-large district
Assumed office
January 3, 2021
Preceded byGreg Gianforte
Auditor of Montana
In office
January 2, 2017 – January 3, 2021
GovernorSteve Bullock
Preceded byMonica Lindeen
Succeeded byTroy Downing
Member of the Montana Senate
from the 18th district
In office
January 7, 2013 – January 2, 2017
Preceded byJohn Brenden
Succeeded bySteve Hinebauch
Member of the Montana House of Representatives
from the 38th district
In office
January 3, 2011 – January 7, 2013
Preceded byDennis Getz
Succeeded byAlan Doane
Personal details
Born
Matthew Martin Rosendale

(1960-07-07) July 7, 1960 (age 60)
Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)
Jean Rosendale
(m. 1985)
Children3
WebsiteHouse website

Matthew Martin Rosendale Sr. (born July 7, 1960)[1] is an American politician and businessman from the state of Montana. He is the U.S. Representative for Montana's at-large congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives, elected in 2020.

Prior to taking office as a congressman, he served as the Montana State Auditor and Commissioner of Securities and Insurance. He was also a member of the Montana Legislature from 2011 to 2017, serving in both houses.

Early life and career[edit]

Rosendale spent his career working in real estate, real estate development and land management.[2] He grew his family real estate business from a single, small five agent office into a full-service firm with 65 agents and four offices.[3]

Rosendale and his wife moved their family to Glendive, Montana, in 2002,[4] where they raised their children. He was twice elected chairman of the Glendive Agri-Trade Expo committee,[5] a local group that puts on an agriculture exposition showcasing agri-business in eastern Montana.[6] Rosendale also served as head of his local Catholic parish council.[5]

Montana State Legislature[edit]

Rosendale says his friends and neighbors in Glendive urged him to run for the state legislature in order to reduce spending and regulations, defend their gun and property rights, and protect the sanctity of life.[7][8]

He served for one two-year term in the State House of Representatives and one four-year term in the State Senate,[9] during which he served as Senate Majority Leader.[10]

2010 State House of Representatives election[edit]

Rosendale announced he would run for the Montana House of Representatives[11] to represent House District 38, which covers Wibaux and part of Dawson county. Also seeking the Republican nomination were Edward Hilbert and Alan Doane, the latter of which ended up succeeding Rosendale in the Montana House. Rosendale prevailed, receiving 48.4% of the vote with Doane receiving 41.3% and Hilbert receiving 10.4%.[12]

Rosendale went on to defeat a Democratic incumbent State Representative Dennis Getz in the general election, receiving 52.7% of the vote to Getz's 47.3%.[13]

2010 General Election for Montana's 38th House of Representatives District[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Rosendale 1,932 52.7
Democratic Dennis Getz (incumbent) 1,735 47.3
Total votes 3,667 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

2011 session of the Montana House of Representatives[edit]

During the 2011 legislative session, Rosendale served on several committees including the Business and Labor Committee, the Transportation Committee, and the Local Government Committee.[15]

2012 State Senate election[edit]

In 2012, with State Senator Donald Steinbeisser's being ineligible to run for reelection due to term limits,[16] Rosendale announced he would run for the Montana State Senate to represent Senate District 19, a heavily Republican district in eastern Montana.[17]

After running unopposed in the Republican primary,[18] Rosendale defeated Democrat Fred Lake in the general election, receiving 67.6% of the vote to Lake's 32.4%.[19]

2012 General Election for Montana's 19th Senate District[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Rosendale 5,929 67.6
Democratic Fred Lake 2,842 32.4
Total votes 8,771 100.0

2013 session of the Montana State Senate[edit]

During the 2013 legislative session, Rosendale served as Vice Chair of the Natural Resources and Transportation Committee. He also served on the Finance and Claims Committee, the Highways and Transportation Committee and the Natural Resources Committee.[15] During this legislative session, Rosendale was the primary sponsor of a resolution urging Congress to submit a balanced budget amendment to states.[21] He also was the primary sponsor of a bill which became law to prevent law enforcement from using drones for surveillance purposes.[22]

Based on Rosendale's voting record in the 2013 legislative session, he earned a 100% on the Montana Family Foundation's scorecard[23] and was also named a "Champion of Business" by the Montana Chamber of Commerce.[24]

2015 session of the Montana State Senate and tenure as Senate Majority Leader[edit]

Due to state redistricting in 2014, Rosendale represented Senate District 18 for the remainder of his tenure.[25] In 2014, Rosendale's colleagues in the State Senate, elected him to serve as the Senate Majority Leader.[10] During the 2015 legislative session, he also served as the Chair of the Rules Committee and as a member of the Finance and Claims Committee and Natural Resources and Transportation Committee.[15] During the session, Rosendale was the primary sponsor of a bill to authorize direct primary care provider plans which passed both houses of the legislature before being vetoed by Democratic Governor Steve Bullock.[26]

Rosendale's voting record in the 2015 session earned him perfect 100% scores on several organizations' scorecards including the Montana Family Foundation.[27] He was the recipient of the American Conservative Union's "Award for Conservative Excellence"[28] and was again named a "Champion of Business" by the Montana Chamber of Commerce.[29]

Montana State Auditor[edit]

Elections[edit]

2016[edit]

With State Auditor Monica Lindeen ineligible to run for re-election due to term limits,[30] Rosendale decided to run for the open State Auditor position.[31]

Rosendale ran unopposed in the Republican primary.[32] In the general election, Rosendale faced Jesse Laslovich,[33] who was Chief Legal Counsel to State Auditor Monica Lindeen and was widely considered to be one of Montana's rising political stars.[34]

Despite being outspent 4:1,[35] Rosendale defeated Democrat Jesse Laslovich receiving 53.6% of the vote to Laslovich's 46.4%.[36] At the time, this was the most expensive State Auditor's race in Montana state history.

Montana State Auditor election, 2016[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Rosendale 256,378 53.6
Democratic Jesse Laslovich 221,551 46.4
Total votes 477,929 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

2018 U.S. Senate election[edit]

In 2017, Rosendale announced he would seek the Republican nomination to challenge two-term incumbent Democratic Senator Jon Tester.[38]

In a competitive four-way primary, Rosendale faced District Judge Russell Fagg, State Senator Al Olszewski, and combat veteran Troy Downing.[11] Rosendale won the Republican primary with 33.8% of the vote, to Fagg's 28.3%, Downing's 19.1% and Olszewski's 18.7%.[39]

Republican primary results[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Rosendale 51,859 33.8%
Republican Russ Fagg 43,465 28.3%
Republican Troy Downing 29,341 19.1%
Republican Al Olszewski 28,681 18.7%
Total votes 153,346 100.00%

After the primary, Rosendale was endorsed by President Donald Trump[41] and Vice President Mike Pence.[42] Trump visited the state to campaign for Rosendale four times,[43] with Pence visiting three times.[44]

Polls showed the race in a statistical tie going into election day,[45] in what was the most expensive election in Montana history, with more than $70 million spent on both sides.[46] Tester's campaign had a huge cash advantage, raising and spending $21 million to Rosendale's $6 million.[47]

In the general election, Tester won 50.3% of the vote to Rosendale's 46.8%, with Libertarian candidate Rick Breckenridge taking 2.9%.[48]

2018 United States Senate election in Montana
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon Tester (incumbent) 253,876 50.3
Republican Matt Rosendale 235,963 46.8
Libertarian Rick Breckenridge 14,545 2.9
Total votes 504,384 100.0

Tenure[edit]

As State Auditor, Rosendale approved direct primary care[26] and Medi-Share.[49]

He has refused to accept a pay raise every single year.[50]

As State Auditor, Rosendale is also one of five members of the Montana State Land Board, which oversees the 5.2 million acres in the state trust land.[51] As a member of the Montana State Land Board, Rosendale voted to expand access to over 45,000 acres (18,000 ha) of public land.[52]

In 2017, Rosendale proposed legislation which would create a reinsurance program so that individuals with pre-existing conditions could access affordable health coverage. This legislation passed both houses of the legislature before being vetoed by Governor Steve Bullock.[53] Rosendale condemned Governor Bullock's veto stating, "the governor has sacrificed good, bipartisan policy in favor of bad, partisan politics."[54]

Rosendale then worked with a bipartisan group of Montana officials to create a reinsurance program and were granted a waiver to do so by the federal government.[55] The program is currently operational.[56]

In 2019, Rosendale proposed legislation targeting Pharmacy Benefits Managers (PBMs) and a practice known as spread pricing.[57] The legislation passed both houses of the legislature[58] before being vetoed by Governor Steve Bullock.[59] Rosendale again condemned Governor Bullock saying his veto "is a gift to the pharmaceutical and insurance industries and it's a slap in the face to consumers."[60]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

Elections[edit]

2014[edit]

In 2013, incumbent Representative Steve Daines announced that he would not seek re-election and would instead run for the United States Senate.[61] Following this, Rosendale announced he would be running to succeed him in the U.S. House of Representatives. In addition to Rosendale, the Republican field included former State Senators Ryan Zinke and Corey Stapleton, State Representative Elsie Arntzen, and real estate investor Drew Turiano.[62]

Rosendale came in third place with 28.8% of the vote, behind Zinke with 33.3% of the vote and Stapleton with 29.3% of the vote. Arntzen and Turiano received 6.9% and 1.7% respectively.[63]

2014 Republican Primary Election for Montana's At-Large Congressional District[64]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ryan Zinke 43,766 33.3
Republican Corey Stapleton 38,591 29.3
Republican Matt Rosendale 37,965 28.8
Republican Elsie Arntzen 9,011 6.9
Republican Drew Turiano 2,290 1.7
Total votes 131,623 100.0

2020[edit]

In June 2019, Congressman Greg Gianforte announced that he would not be seeking re-election and would instead run for Governor to replace term-limited Governor Steve Bullock.[65] Days later, Rosendale announced he would run for the open congressional seat.[66]

Rosendale received the early endorsement of President Donald Trump.[67] He also received early endorsements from elected officials around the country including Senator Ted Cruz, Senator Rand Paul, House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy, House Republican Whip Steve Scalise and Congressman Jim Jordan,[68] as well as the endorsement of the Crow Tribe of Montana.[69]

He won the six-way Republican primary with 48.3% of the vote, carrying all of Montana's 56 counties.[70]

2020 Republican Primary Election for Montana's At-Large Congressional District [71]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Rosendale 104,286 48.3
Republican Corey Stapleton 71,593 33.2
Republican Debra Lamm 14,418 6.7
Republican Joe Dooling 13,689 6.3
Republican Mark McGinley 7,790 3.6
Republican John Evankovich 3,965 1.8
Total votes 215,471 100.0

Rosendale defeated Democrat Kathleen Williams in the general election in November, capturing 56.4% of the vote to Williams' 43.6%.[72]

2020 General Election for Montana's At-Large Congressional District
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Rosendale 339,020 56.4
Democratic Kathleen Williams 262,254 43.6
Total votes 601,274 100.0

Caucus memberships[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Rosendale and his wife, Jean, reside on a ranch north of Glendive.[74] The couple has three adult children.[35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Drake, Phil (July 3, 2018). "Who is Matt Rosendale? Trump rally to support Montana's GOP Senate candidate". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  2. ^ "Matt M. Rosendale | Commissioner of Securities and Insurance". The Office of the Montana State Auditor, Commissioner of Securities and Insurance. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  3. ^ Durnal, Halle. "Rosendale will create jobs if elected to Senate". Bozeman Daily Chronicle. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  4. ^ Cates-Carney, Corin. "Candidate Profile: Matt Rosendale". www.mtpr.org. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  5. ^ a b holly.michels@lee.net, HOLLY K. MICHELS. "Rosendale hoping alignment with Trump will help carry him to U.S. Senate". Helena Independent Record. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  6. ^ Star, SUE ROESLER, The Prairie. "GATE show celebrates agriculture, agri-businesses". AgUpdate. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  7. ^ Drake, Phil. "Candidate Matt Rosendale says he'll support Trump policies in Montana". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  8. ^ "Matt Rosendale". The Laurel Outlook. October 4, 2018. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  9. ^ "Legislator Information: Matt Rosendale".
  10. ^ a b "On heels of Senate loss, Montana's Matt Rosendale running for Congress — again". Roll Call. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  11. ^ a b holly.michels@lee.net, HOLLY K. MICHELS. "As U.S. Senate primary nears, GOP candidates seek to separate selves from pack". Helena Independent Record. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  12. ^ "Montana 2010 Legislative Primary Election Results" (PDF).
  13. ^ "Montana 2010 Legislative General Election Results" (PDF).
  14. ^ "2010 Statewide Montana General Election Canvas" (PDF). Montana Secretary of State. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  15. ^ a b c "Legislator Details: Matt Rosendale".
  16. ^ "Montana State Senate elections, 2012". Ballotpedia. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  17. ^ "Montana State Senate District 19". Ballotpedia. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  18. ^ "Montana 2012 Legislative Primary Election Results" (PDF).
  19. ^ "Montana 2012 Legislative General Election Results" (PDF).
  20. ^ "2012 Statewide Montana General Election Canvas" (PDF). Montana Secretary of State. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  21. ^ "LAWS Detailed Bill Information Page". laws.leg.mt.gov. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  22. ^ "LAWS Detailed Bill Information Page". laws.leg.mt.gov. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  23. ^ "Montana Family Foundation 2013 Legislative Scorecard" (PDF).
  24. ^ "Montana Chamber of Commerce 2013 Voting Review" (PDF).
  25. ^ "Montana Legislative Districts For Elections Held in 2014-2022" (PDF).
  26. ^ a b holly.michels@lee.net, HOLLY K. MICHELS. "Direct primary care, twice vetoed by governor, advanced by Rosendale". The Billings Gazette. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  27. ^ "Montana Family Foundation 2015 Legislative Scorecard" (PDF).
  28. ^ "ACU 2015 Ratings of Montana" (PDF).
  29. ^ "Montana Chamber of Commerce 2015 Voting Review" (PDF).
  30. ^ Bureau, IR State. "Lindeen eyes run for secretary of state". Helena Independent Record. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  31. ^ "Matthew Rosendale Enters State Auditor Race". www.mtpr.org. Associated Press. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  32. ^ "Montana 2016 Statewide Primary Election Results" (PDF).
  33. ^ Michels, Holly. "Rosendale has 10-point lead over Laslovich in auditor's race; 24 percent undecided". The Billings Gazette. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  34. ^ "State Senator resigns seat, takes top legal post". The Billings Gazette. Associated Press. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  35. ^ a b "Meet Matt". Matt Rosendale For Montana. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  36. ^ "Montana 2016 Statewide General Election Results" (PDF).
  37. ^ "Montana Auditor Results: Matt Rosendale Wins". August 1, 2017. Retrieved January 31, 2018 – via NYTimes.com.
  38. ^ O'Brien, Edward. "Matt Rosendale Announces Run For Montana Senate Seat". www.mtpr.org. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  39. ^ "Montana 2018 Statewide Primary Election Results" (PDF).
  40. ^ Cite error: The named reference Primary Election was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  41. ^ Oprysko, Caitlin. "Trump boosts Rosendale in tight Montana Senate race". POLITICO. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  42. ^ "Vice President Mike Pence stumps for Rosendale in Kalispell; Tester campaigns in Missoula | 406 Politics | billingsgazette.com". billingsgazette.com. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  43. ^ "Trump to go to Montana for 4th rally for GOP Senate hopeful". AP NEWS. October 30, 2018. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  44. ^ "Vice president to campaign for Rosendale in Kalispell". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  45. ^ holly.michels@lee.net, HOLLY K. MICHELS. "In final push to election day, Tester and Rosendale stay the course". Helena Independent Record. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  46. ^ "More than $70 million spent in Montana US Senate race". AP NEWS. December 10, 2018. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  47. ^ "2018 Election United States Senate - Montana". FEC.gov. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  48. ^ "Montana U.S. Senate Election Results". New York Times. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  49. ^ holly.michels@lee.net, HOLLY K. MICHELS. "Health care cost-sharing program Medi-Share now in Montana". Helena Independent Record. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  50. ^ Drake, Phil. "Pay hikes kick in July 1 for some state elected officials". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  51. ^ "Matt M. Rosendale | Commissioner of Securities and Insurance". The Office of the Montana State Auditor, Commissioner of Securities and Insurance. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  52. ^ "MONTANA: Public lands issues loom large in primaries". www.eenews.net. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  53. ^ Drake, Phil. "Veto sparks angry response trom insurance coverage". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  54. ^ "Rosendale Slams Bullock's Veto of HB 652". The Office of the Montana State Auditor, Commissioner of Securities and Insurance. May 9, 2017. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  55. ^ Chrestenson, Nick. "Trump Administration Approves Montana Reinsurance Waiver". Newstalk KGVO. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  56. ^ Christian, Peter. "Rosendale says Reinsurance Makes Health Insurance Rates Lower". Newstalk KGVO. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  57. ^ "Montana Legislature: Bill takes aim at 'middle man' to lower prescription drug costs". Missoula Current. February 1, 2019. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  58. ^ "LAWS Detailed Bill Information Page". laws.leg.mt.gov. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  59. ^ "Bullock vetoes high-profile bill meant to rein in drug prices; says it would do the opposite". KRTV. May 9, 2019. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  60. ^ "BULLOCK VETOES SB 71, SIDES WITH DRUG INDUSTRY OVER MONTANANS". The Office of the Montana State Auditor, Commissioner of Securities and Insurance. May 9, 2019. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  61. ^ Dennison, Mike. "Daines announces candidacy for U.S. Senate". missoulian.com. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  62. ^ "United States House of Representatives elections in Montana, 2014". Ballotpedia. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  63. ^ "Montana 2014 Statewide Primary Election Results" (PDF).
  64. ^ "2014 Statewide Montana Primary Election Canvas" (PDF). Montana Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 28, 2014. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  65. ^ holly.michels@lee.net, HOLLY K. MICHELS. "Gianforte files to run for governor in 2020". Helena Independent Record. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  66. ^ holly.michels@lee.net, HOLLY K. MICHELS. "Rosendale running for Montana's US House seat in 2020". Helena Independent Record. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  67. ^ Drake, Phil. "Trump endorses Rosendale in U.S. House race". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  68. ^ Christian, Peter. "President Trump has Endorsed Matt Rosendale for U.S. House". Newstalk KGVO. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  69. ^ "Crow Tribal Chairman endorses Trump campaign". Indian Country Today. Retrieved September 29, 2020.
  70. ^ "Montana Secretary of State". electionresults.mt.gov. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  71. ^ "2020 Primary Election". Montana Secretary of State. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  72. ^ "Rosendale and Williams will face off for Montana's U.S. House seat". KRTV. June 3, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  73. ^ "House Freedom Fund". www.housefreedomfund.com. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  74. ^ "Matt M. Rosendale - Commissioner of Securities and Insurance". csimt.gov. Retrieved January 31, 2018.

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Monica Lindeen
Auditor of Montana
2017–2021
Succeeded by
Troy Downing
Party political offices
Preceded by
Denny Rehberg
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Montana
(Class 1)

2018
Most recent
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Greg Gianforte
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana's at-large congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
August Pfluger
United States Representatives by seniority
425th
Succeeded by
Deborah K. Ross