Matt Williams (TV producer)

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Matt Williams
Born
Matthew Williams

c. 1951-1952
OccupationTelevision producer, television writer
Years active1980s–present

Matt Williams (born 1951-1952)[1] is an American television producer and television writer.

Williams, whose birth name is Mark, is a graduate of the University of Evansville and did post-graduate work in theater at The University of New Orleans.[2] Before becoming a writer and producer, he was an actor, appearing in commercials, theater and on the Christian Broadcasting Network soap opera Another Life in the early 1980s.[3]

One of his many credits is creating and executive producing, along with Carmen Finestra and David McFazean, the TV series Home Improvement. He produces films such as What Women Want. He was the writer/producer for The Cosby Show and A Different World, and wrote the screenplay for Wild Hearts Can't Be Broken. Williams created the TV series Roseanne but was fired after the 13th episode.[4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13]

Additionally, he has written the play "Between Daylight and Boonville", and directed and co-produced the feature film Where the Heart Is starring Natalie Portman. He also wrote and directed Walker Payne in 2006, starring Jason Patric, Drea de Matteo, and Sam Shepard.[14]

Williams is originally from Evansville, Indiana.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/1993-05-23/entertainment/ca-38794_1_home-improvement
  2. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/1993-05-23/entertainment/ca-38794_1_home-improvement
  3. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0135078/fullcredits?ref_=tt_cl_sm#cast
  4. ^ "AT IT TURNS OUT, ROSEANNE JUST MAY HAVE BEEN RIGHT". deseretnews.com. 8 April 1994. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  5. ^ FINKE, NIKKI (26 January 1989). "One Big Happy Family? : Why 'Roseanne's' Creator Left Hit Show After Dispute With Its Star". Retrieved 10 May 2018 – via LA Times.
  6. ^ "And I Should Know". NYMag.com. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  7. ^ "The Roseanne revival, and the argument over how TV depicts Trump supporters, explained". vox.com. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  8. ^ "6 Bizarre Explanations From the Set of Roseanne". mentalfloss.com. 24 July 2008. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Roseanne Returns: Is TV Ready for a Trump-Loving Comic With "Nothing Left to Prove"?". hollywoodreporter.com. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  10. ^ Barr, Roseanne. "From the Archives: Roseanne on Her Life in Television". vulture.com. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  11. ^ "Barr Becomes The Boss After `Roseanne` Rift". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  12. ^ "Roseanne Unchained". people.com. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  13. ^ "37 Details About "Roseanne" That Will Change the Way You See the Show". goodhousekeeping.com. 5 March 2018. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  14. ^ "Matt Williams Movies & TV". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-02-28.
  15. ^ McBain, Roger (2010-02-11). "Evansville native drew on family, friends for breakthrough play's characters » Evansville Courier & Press". Courierpress.com. Retrieved 2013-09-10.

External links[edit]