Matthew Aucoin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Matthew Aucoin
Born1990 (age 28–29)

Matthew Aucoin (born 1990) is an American composer, conductor, pianist, and writer best known for his operas. Aucoin has received commissions from the Metropolitan Opera, Carnegie Hall, Lyric Opera of Chicago, the American Repertory Theater, the Peabody Essex Museum, Harvard University, and NPR's This American Life.[1][2] [3][4][5][6][7] He was appointed as Los Angeles Opera's first-ever Artist-in-Residence in 2016.[8] He is a 2018 MacArthur Fellow. [9]

Biography[edit]

Aucoin was born and raised in the Boston area. While attending Medfield High School,[10] Aucoin was the keyboardist in an indie rock band, Elephantom.[11] He attended Harvard College, where he studied poetry, graduating summa cum laude in 2012. His mentors at Harvard included Jorie Graham and Helen Vendler. While an undergraduate, Aucoin conducted productions of Die Fledermaus and Le Nozze di Figaro with the Dunster House Opera Society, now known as Harvard College Opera. Aucoin then received a graduate diploma from The Juilliard School, where he studied with composer Robert Beaser. Concurrently, he served as an Assistant Conductor at the Metropolitan Opera. Between 2013 and 2015, Aucoin was the Solti Conducting Apprentice at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

List of works[edit]

Opera[edit]

  • From Sandover (2010)
  • Hart Crane (2012)
  • Crossing (2015)
  • Second Nature (2015)

[12]

Orchestra[edit]

  • The Seal Broken (2012)
  • This Same Light (2013)
  • Evidence (2016)
  • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (2016)[13]

Chamber music[edit]

  • Poem for Violin, solo violin (with projected text) (2012)
  • Three Whitman Songs, for baritone and piano (2013)
  • Piano Trio (2014)
  • The Orphic Moment, dramatic cantata for countertenor, solo violin, and chamber ensemble (2014)
  • Celan Fragments, violin and piano (2014)
  • Three Études for solo piano (2014)
  • Dual, duet for cello and bass (2015)
  • This Earth, for voice (countertenor or mezzo-soprano) and piano (2015)
  • Merrill Songs, for tenor and piano (2015)
  • This Earth, arranged for voice and quintet (flute, clarinet, violin, cello, piano) (2016)
  • revolve, for solo violin (2016)
  • Finery Forge," for two pianos (2016)
  • Its Own Accord, for violin and piano (2017)
  • Treating Shadows as Solid Things, for a cappella choir (2017)
  • Soft Power, for string quartet (2018)
  • From a Desert, for solo cello (2018)
  • With Care, for two violins (2018)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cooper, Michael (October 8, 2013). "The Met's Commissioning Program Is Starting to Bear Operas". The New York Times. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  2. ^ Rotella, Carlo (May 27, 2015). "Matthew Aucoin, Opera's Great 25-Year-Old Hope". The New York Times. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  3. ^ Huizenga, Tom (October 4, 2018). "MacArthur Fellow Matthew Aucoin Talks Composing And Donating His 'Genius' Money". NPR. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  4. ^ Shea, Andrea (June 4, 2015). "A 25-Year-Old Opera Composer Who Does It All". Deceptive Cadence. NPR. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  5. ^ Gamerman, Ellen (July 17, 2014). "Portrait of a Prodigy: Is Matthew Aucoin the Next Leonard Bernstein?". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  6. ^ Gay, Malcolm (May 10, 2015). "Musical wunderkind Aucoin is a star in ascendancy: Composer. Poet. Conductor. There doesn't seem to be much that Medfield's Matthew Aucoin can't do". The Boston Globe. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  7. ^ Dimock, Wai Chee (June 4, 2015). "Walt Whitman and the Essence of Opera". The New Yorker. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  8. ^ "LA Opera - Matthew Aucoin". www.laopera.org. Retrieved 2016-06-05.
  9. ^ Deb, Sopan (Oct 4, 2018). "MacArthur 'Genius' Grant Winners for 2018: The Full List". Retrieved Mar 22, 2019 – via NYTimes.com.
  10. ^ Olesin, Nancy. "MacArthur 'genius' Matthew Aucoin grew up in Natick, attended Rivers School". Wicked Local. Retrieved Mar 22, 2019.
  11. ^ "Elephantom". SoundCloud. Retrieved Mar 22, 2019.
  12. ^ Shia, Jonathan (September 25, 2017). "Matt Aucoin". The Last Magazine. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  13. ^ Forstman, Edward (October 6, 2016). "ASO Premieres Aucoin Concerto This Weekend". artsBHAM. Retrieved February 23, 2017.

External links[edit]