Matthew Walker (scientist)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Matthew Walker
Born
Matthew Paul Walker

1972/1973 (age 45–46)[1]
Other namesSleep Diplomat
Alma mater
Known forWhy We Sleep
Scientific career
FieldsNeuroscience
Psychology[2]
InstitutionsHarvard University
University of California, Berkeley
ThesisA psychophysiological investigation into fluctuating levels of consciousness in neurodegenerative dementia (1999)
Websitesleepdiplomat.com

Matthew Paul Walker is an English scientist and professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.[2] His research focuses on the impact of sleep on human health and disease. Previously, he was a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is also the founder and director of the Center for Human Sleep Science. He has received numerous funding awards from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, and is a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences. He has published more than 100 scientific research studies and has been featured on numerous television and radio outlets, including 60 Minutes, Amanpour & Company, National Geographic, NOVA scienceNOW, The Joe Rogan Experience, NPR, The Drive with Peter Attia, and the BBC.

Early life and education[edit]

Walker was born in Liverpool, England. He spent his early life in Liverpool and Chester.[3] Walker was graduated with a degree in neuroscience from University of Nottingham in 1996. He received a Ph.D. in neurophysiology from Newcastle University in 1999,[4] where his research was funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) Neurochemical Pathology Unit.[5]

Career and research[edit]

Harvard University[edit]

In June 2004, Walker became a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. In one experiment he conducted in October 2002, he trained people to type a complex series of keys on a computer keyboard as quickly as possible. One group started in the morning and the other started in the evening, with a 12-hour time interval for each group respectively. He and his colleagues found that those who were tested in the evening first and re-tested after getting a good night's sleep improved their performance significantly without a loss of accuracy compared to their counterparts.[6][7]

Berkeley[edit]

Walker left Harvard in July 2007 and since then has taught as a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Center for Human Sleep Science[edit]

Walker is the founder and director of the Center for Human Sleep Science, which is located in UC Berkeley's department of psychology, in association with the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute and the Henry H. Wheeler Jr. Brain Imaging Center. The organization uses brain imaging methods (MRI, PET scanning), high-density sleep electroencephalography recordings, genomics, proteomics, autonomic physiology, brain stimulation, and cognitive testing to investigate the role of sleep in human health and disease. It researches Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer, depression, anxiety, insomnia, cardiovascular disease, drug abuse, obesity, and diabetes.[8]

Hello[edit]

In August 2016, Walker began working with Hello, a consumer electronics company that made a sleep tracking device called Sense. He was hired as their chief scientific officer to analyze and improve people's sleeping habits based on the data they aggregated.[9] Walker left in July 2017 when Hello shut down.[10]

Google[edit]

Since October 2017, Walker has been working as a sleep scientist at Google Life Sciences (Verily), a research organization of Alphabet Inc. devoted to the study of life sciences.[1] Here, Walker helps the scientific exploration of sleep in health and disease.

Why We Sleep[edit]

In October 2017, Penguin Random House and Scribner published Walker's first book, Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams ISBN 978-0-241-26906-0.[11][12][13][14][15][16] He spent four years writing the book,[17] in which he asserts that sleep deprivation is linked to numerous fatal diseases, including dementia.[18] The book became an International Bestseller, including a #1 Sunday Times Bestseller in the UK,[19] and a New York Times Bestseller.[20]

Awards and honours[edit]

Walker has received numerous funding awards from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.[21]

TED talk[edit]

Walker gave one of the main-stage talks at the TED conference in Vancouver in 2019. The talk was entitled, "Sleep is Your Superpower", and received over 1 million views within the first 24-hours of being online.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cooke, Rachel (24 September 2017). "'Sleep should be prescribed': what those late nights out could be costing you". the Guardian. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  2. ^ a b Matthew Walker publications indexed by Google Scholar Edit this at Wikidata
  3. ^ "Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams, by Matthew Walker". 5 October 2017. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  4. ^ Walker, Matthew Paul (1999). A psychophysiological investigation into fluctuating levels of consciousness in neurodegenerative dementia. jisc.ac.uk (PhD thesis). Newcastle University. OCLC 45068811. EThOS uk.bl.ethos.323701.
  5. ^ "Matthew P Walker". Loop. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  6. ^ "Matthew Walker". 17 October 2002. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  7. ^ "Sleep - NOVA Science Now - Discovery/Psychology/Health (documentary) - Video Dailymotion". Dailymotion. 17 February 2014. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  8. ^ "humansleepscience". humansleepscience. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  9. ^ Silver, Curtis. "Hello Hires Sleep Scientist To Help The World Level Up Its Sleep". Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Sense sleep tracker maker Hello is shutting down – TechCrunch". techcrunch.com. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  11. ^ Kamp, David (10 October 2017). "Exploring the Necessity and Virtue of Sleep". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  12. ^ "Subscribe to read". Financial Times. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  13. ^ Walker, Matthew (2017-10-03). Why We Sleep. ISBN 9781501144318. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  14. ^ Moody, Oliver (30 September 2017). "Review: Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams by Matthew Walker". The Times. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  15. ^ "Everything you need to know about sleep, but are too tired to ask". 17 October 2017. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  16. ^ "Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker - Kirkus Reviews". Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  17. ^ O'Connell, Mark (2017-09-21). "Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker review – how more sleep can save your life". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-09-24.
  18. ^ "A 'catastrophic sleep-loss epidemic' is killing us, warns leading scientist". The Independent. 2017-09-24. Retrieved 2017-09-24.
  19. ^ "Why We Sleep".
  20. ^ "Best Sellers - Nov. 12, 2017 - the New York Times". The New York Times.
  21. ^ "Sleep Diplomat: Professor Matt Walker PhD". Sleep Diplomat: Professor Matt Walker PhD. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  22. ^ Anwar, Yasmin; May 13, Media Relations|; 2019May 14; 2019 (2019-05-13). "You won't snooze through this TED Talk". Berkeley News. Retrieved 2019-06-02.