Matthias Bachinger

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Matthias Bachinger
Matthias Bachinger 2, 2015 Wimbledon Qualifying - Diliff.jpg
Country (sports)  Germany
Residence Munich, Germany
Born (1987-04-02) 2 April 1987 (age 31)
Munich, West Germany
Height 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Turned pro 2005
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Coach Lars Übel
Prize money $ 1,452,408
Singles
Career record 28–50
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 85 (15 August 2011)
Current ranking No. 135 (24 September 2018)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 2R (2015)
French Open 1R (2015)
Wimbledon 1R (2011, 2012)
US Open 2R (2014)
Doubles
Career record 5–19
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 151 (31 October 2011)
Current ranking No. 686 (20 August 2018)
Last updated on: 24 September 2018.

Matthias Bachinger (born 2 April 1987) is a professional tennis player from Germany who turned professional in 2005. His career-high singles ranking is world No. 85, achieved in August 2011.

Playing style[edit]

Bachinger has an unusual take-back and swing on his forehand and backhand. He has solid groundstrokes, with both sides capable of producing winners. He has a good serve that can reach up to 127 mph (204km/h). He is very strong at the net and frequently rushes to the net. He frequently serve-and-volleys and uses the chip-and-charge tactic on returns.

Professional career[edit]

In 2007, Bachinger qualified for his first ATP tournament, the 2007 BMW Open. Bachinger won in the first round against Andreas Beck 6–2, 7–6, 7–5 before losing to Marcos Baghdatis in the second round 6–7, 2–6, 4–6.

In 2008, Bachinger entered the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament, the BMW Open, the Austrian Open and the If Stockholm Open, losing in the first round in each event.

He then played only Challenger level tournaments before qualifying for the 2010 If Stockholm Open, where he reached the second round.

Bachinger reached his first ATP semifinal at the 2012 BRD Năstase Țiriac Trophy. He also reached the quarterfinals of Umag the same year, defeating seventh-seeded Martin Kližan en route.[1]

In 2013, Bachinger defeated Andreas Seppi, then ranked 18, for his first top 20 win.

In 2014, he reached the semifinals in Stockholm as a qualifier.

In 2018, he reached his first ATP Tour final in Metz (again as a qualifier) after beating Kei Nishikori in the semifinals, but lost to Gilles Simon.

ATP career finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (1 runner-up)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–0)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (0–1)
Finals by surface
Hard (0–1)
Clay (0–0)
Grass (0–0)
Result W–L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Opponent Score
Loss 0–1 Sep 2018 Moselle Open, France 250 Series Hard (i) France Gilles Simon 6–7(2–7), 1–6

Doubles: 1 (1 runner-up)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–0)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (0–1)
Finals by surface
Hard (0–1)
Clay (0–0)
Grass (0–0)
Result W–L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 0–1 Jul 2011 Atlanta Open, United States 250 Series Hard Germany Frank Moser United States Alex Bogomolov Jr.
Australia Matthew Ebden
6–3, 5–7, [8–10]

ATP Challenger Tour finals[edit]

Singles: 13 (4–9)[edit]

Result W–L    Date    Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Win 1–0 Nov 2007 Louisville, US Hard (i) United States Donald Young 0–6, 7–5, 6–3
Loss 1–1 Mar 2008 Kyoto, Japan Carpet (i) Japan Go Soeda 6–7(0–7), 6–2, 4–6
Loss 1–2 Aug 2008 Freudenstadt, Germany Clay Germany Simon Greul 3–6, 4–6
Win 2–2 Nov 2010 Loughborough, United Kingdom Hard (i) Denmark Frederik Nielsen 6–3, 3–6, 6–1
Loss 2–3 Mar 2011 Pingguo, China Hard Japan Go Soeda 4–6, 5–7
Win 3–3 Apr 2011 Athens, Greece Hard Russia Dmitry Tursunov walkover
Loss 3–4 Jun 2011 Nottingham, United Kingdom Grass Luxembourg Gilles Müller 6–7(4–7), 2–6
Loss 3–5 Jul 2011 Granby, Canada Hard France Édouard Roger-Vasselin 6–7(9–11), 6–4, 1–6
Loss 3–6 Nov 2011 Helsinki, Finland Hard (i) Germany Daniel Brands 6–7(2–7), 6–7(5–7)
Loss 3–7 Nov 2012 Geneva, Switzerland Hard (i) France Marc Gicquel 6–3, 3–6, 4–6
Loss 3–8 Nov 2014 Ortisei, Italy Hard (i) Italy Andreas Seppi 4–6, 3–6
Win 4–8 Sep 2017 Gwangju, South Korea Hard Chinese Taipei Yang Tsung-hua 6–3, 6–4
Loss 4–9 Sep 2018 Manacor, Spain Hard Australia Bernard Tomic 6–4, 3–6, 6–7(3–7)

Doubles: 7 (4–3)[edit]

Result W–L    Date    Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 0–1 May 2008 Sanremo, Italy Clay Germany Daniel Brands Israel Harel Levy
United States Jim Thomas
4–6, 4–6
Win 1–1 Jul 2009 Rimini, Italy Clay Germany Dieter Kindlmann Italy Leonardo Azzaro
Italy Marco Crugnola
6–4, 6–2
Win 2–1 Jun 2010 Marburg, Germany Clay Germany Denis Gremelmayr Spain Guillermo Olaso
Slovenia Grega Žemlja
6–4, 6–4
Win 3–1 Feb 2011 Wolfsburg, Germany Carpet (i) Germany Simon Stadler Germany Dominik Meffert
Denmark Frederik Nielsen
3–6, 7–6(7–3), [10–7]
Loss 3–2 Apr 2011 Athens, Greece Hard Germany Benjamin Becker United Kingdom Colin Fleming
United States Scott Lipsky
walkover
Loss 3–3 Jul 2011 Granby, Canada Hard Germany Frank Moser Slovakia Karol Beck
France Édouard Roger-Vasselin
1–6, 3–6
Win 4–3 Aug 2014 Meerbusch, Germany Clay Germany Dominik Meffert China Gong Maoxin
Chinese Taipei Peng Hsien-yin
6–3, 3–6, [10–6]

Performance timelines[edit]

Singles[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; (G) gold, (F-S) silver or (SF-B) bronze Olympic medal; a (NMS) downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

Current through the 2018 Moselle Open.

Tournament 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 SR W–L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open A A A Q1 Q3 Q2 Q2 1R Q2 Q2 2R A Q2 1R 0 / 3 1–3
French Open A A Q1 Q1 Q1 A Q1 Q3 Q2 Q1 1R Q1 A Q1 0 / 1 0–1
Wimbledon A A Q1 Q2 Q3 A 1R 1R Q1 Q2 Q2 Q3 A Q3 0 / 2 0–2
US Open A A A Q1 Q1 A 1R 1R Q2 2R Q1 Q3 A Q1 0 / 3 1–3
Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–2 0–3 0–0 1–1 1–2 0–0 0–0 0–1 0 / 9 2–9
Career statistics
Tournaments 0 0 1 4 0 2 10 16 6 2 4 1 0 4 50
Titles / Finals 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 1
Overall Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 1–1 0–4 0–0 1–2 4–10 9–16 2–6 4–2 2–4 0–1 0–0 5–4 28–50
Year-end ranking 648 332 173 225 239 187 94 123 159 141 222 493 180 36%

Doubles[edit]

Tournament 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 SR W–L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open A 1R A A A 0 / 1 0–1
French Open A 1R A A A 0 / 1 0–1
Wimbledon 2R 1R Q1 A Q1 0 / 2 1–2
US Open 1R A A A A 0 / 1 0–1
Win–Loss 1–2 0–3 0–0 0–0 0–0 0 / 5 1–5
Career statistics
Titles / Finals 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cilic beats Brands to reach Umag quarterfinals". 11 July 2012.

External links[edit]