Maurice Browne

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Maurice Browne (12 February 1881 – 21 January 1955), born in Reading, England, was best known as a theater producer in the United States and the UK. The Cambridge-educated Browne was also a poet, actor, and theater director. He has been credited, along with his then-wife Ellen Van Volkenburg, with being the founder of the Little Theatre Movement in America through his work with the Chicago Little Theatre.[1] Browne and Van Volkenburg went on to found the department of drama at the Cornish School in Seattle in 1918, now Cornish College of the Arts.[2] Browne's greatest triumph came in 1929 when he produced Journey's End, by R. C. Sherriff in London.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Browne, Maurice. Too Late to Lament: An Autobiography. London, Gollancz, 1955, p. 128.
  2. ^ Cornish, Nellie C. Miss Aunt Nellie: The Autobiography of Nellie C. Cornish, Ellen Van Volkenburg Browne and Edward Nordhoff Beck, eds. Seattle, University of Washington, 1964, p. 109.
  3. ^ Browne, Maurice. Too Late to Lament: An Autobiography. London, Gollancz, 1955, pp. 306-309.
  • Browne, Maurice. Too Late to Lament: An Autobiography. London, Gollancz, 1955.
  • Chansky, Dorothy. Composing Ourselves: The Little Theatre Movement and the American Audience. Carbondale, Seattle, Southern Illinois University, 2004.
  • Cheney, Sheldon. The New Movement in the Theatre. New York, Mitchell Kennerley, 1914.
  • Cornish, Nellie C. Miss Aunt Nellie: The Autobiography of Nellie C. Cornish, Ellen Van Volkenburg Browne and Edward Nordhoff Beck, eds. Seattle, University of Washington, 1964.

External links[edit]