Max & Co

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Max & Co
Directed by Samuel Guillaume
Frédéric Guillaume
Produced by Samuel Guillaume
Emmanuel Salinger
Written by Emmanuel Salinger
Christine Dory
Starring Lorànt Deutsch
Amélie Lerma
Virginie Efira
Patrick Bouchitey
Micheline Dax
Denis Podalydès
Music by Bruno Coulais
Cinematography Renato Berta
Edited by Mackinnon & Saunders
Production
company
MAX-LeFilm-Sàrl
Ciné-Manufacture SA
Nexus Factory
Future Films
With The Support of: CNC
Fonds Government of Belgium Tax Shelter
Fonds Suisse Regio Films
Television Suisse Romande
Distributed by WilDBuncH InternationaL
Release date
  • 11 June 2007 (2007-06-11) (Annecy)
  • 6 February 2008 (2008-02-06) (Belgium)
  • 13 February 2008 (2008-02-13) (France)
  • 14 February 2008 (2008-02-14) (Russia)
Running time
76 minutes
Country Belgium
Switzerland
France
United Kingdom
Language French
Box office $1 million[1]

Max & Co is a 2007 stop-motion animated feature film released in Belgium, France, and Switzerland in February 2008. It won the Audience Award at the 2007 Annecy International Animated Film Festival. With its budget of CHF 30 million (€14 million), of which CHF 1.5 million were subsidised by the Swiss Federal Office of Culture, it was the most expensive Swiss film ever.[2]

Plot[edit]

15-year-old Max sets off for Saint-Hilare in search of his father, the famous troubadour Johnny Bigoude, who disappeared shortly before Max's birth. He is waylaid by Sam, a rascally fairground entertainer, and introduced to the delights of the amazing Fly Swatter Festival. When Max finally gets there, Saint-Hilaire turns out to be the private kingdom of Bzzz & Co., infamous manufacturers of flyswatters, run by the degenerate Rodolfo. Musical virtuoso Max makes a big impression, especially on smart, lovely, resourceful Felicie, who convinces Rodolfo to hire him.


Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

Although well-received critically, the "anti-capitalist ecological fable"[2] was a commercial failure. Only 16,000 tickets were sold instead of the projected 110,000, and the production companies filed for bankruptcy in August 2008.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]