Max Abegglen

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Max Abegglen
Personal information
Full name Max Abegglen
Date of birth 11 April 1902 (1902-04-11)
Place of birth Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Date of death 25 August 1970 (1970-08-26) (aged 68)
Playing position Forward
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1918–1919 FC Cantonal
1919–1923 Lausanne-Sports
1923–1941 Grasshopper Club
National team
1922–1937 Switzerland 68 (34)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Max "Xam" Abegglen (11 April 1902 – 25 August 1970) was a Swiss footballer who played as a forward. Throughout his career, he played for FC Lausanne until 1923 when he transferred to Grasshopper Zurich. He was the brother of André 'Trello' Abegglen and Jean Abegglen, both also players of the Swiss national team.

Abegglen played for the Swiss national team 68 times, scoring 34 goals. He was the sole leading goalscorer for the team until Kubilay Türkyilmaz's 34th goal in his 62nd and final international in 2001. Their records were broken on 30 May 2008 with Alexander Frei's 35th goal.[1]

Abegglen scored a hat-trick in his first international, against the Netherlands in Bern on 19 November 1922.[2] His only other hat-trick was in the Football at the 1924 Summer Olympics on 24 May 1924, with three in a 9–0 win over Lithuania. [3] The Swiss won the silver medal after losing the final 3–0 to Uruguay. Abegglen missed the 1934 FIFA World Cup. In his final match, he was captain as Switzerland lost 1–0 to Nazi Germany on 2 May 1937.[4]

The club Neuchâtel Xamax, twice Swiss champions in the 1980s, is named after "Xam" Max Abegglen.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Goalscoring for Switzerland National Team". RSSSF. Retrieved 17 July 2007. 
  2. ^ MATCH: 19 November 1922 Switzerland v Netherlands 5:0. Eu-football.info (19 November 1922).
  3. ^ MATCH: 25 May 1924 Lithuania v Switzerland 0:9. Eu-football.info (25 May 1924).
  4. ^ MATCH: 2 May 1937 Switzerland v Germany 0:1. Eu-football.info (2 May 1937).
  5. ^ Inglis, Simon (1990). The Football Grounds of Europe. London: Collins Willow. p. 243. ISBN 0-00-218305-6. 

External links[edit]