Max Brody

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Max Brody
Birth name Matthew Woods Brody
Born 1969 (age 48–49)
Elgin, Illinois, U.S.
Origin Austin, Texas, U.S.
Genres Experimental rock, industrial dance, industrial rock, big beat
Instruments Various
Years active 1986–present
Labels Sanctuary
Warner
Associated acts Ministry
Pink Anvil
Areola 51
Insect Sex Act
Naugahyde Dream Sequence
Sangre de Toro
Goobersmoochers
Euripides Pants
Test Apes
Website maxbrodyworld.com

Max Brody (born Matthew Woods Brody, 1969) is an American musician based outside of Seattle, Washington, best known as the drummer/saxophonist for the hard rock band Ministry from 1999-2004

Personal life[edit]

Brody was born in the town of Elgin, Illinois and was raised there until the age of five, when his family relocated to Scottsdale, Arizona. Brody started playing clarinet in the second grade, switching to saxophone as soon as he could reasonably hold one. By high school, he and his brother, Doug, were writing and recording jazzy, ambient, "new age" songs under the moniker "Mosaic" at their parents', house which resulted in a series of recordings that were released in the mid- to late 1980s on the Invincible label out of Phoenix, Arizona. The two also made appearances on albums by other artists on that label. Brody later taught himself to play drums.

After his graduation from high school in 1987, Brody moved to Claremont, California and graduated from Pomona College in 1991. Bouncing back and forth from Los Angeles to Seattle, he eventually settled on Austin, where his favorite bands came from.

He met his wife, Sherry, on the set of A.I.; she was an extra in the film. They married in 2004, in Arizona. They have one child together named Isabella. Divorced in 2010, he now has full custody of his daughter and lives in Washington state.

Career[edit]

After graduating college, Brody moved to Seattle, Washington and played in various local rock bands. Finding the Seattle scene saturated, he moved to Austin, Texas in 1993. There, he met and became musical partners with Rey Washam, drummer for such seminal punk/hardcore acts as Rapeman, Scratch Acid and the Big Boys. They went on to form the short-lived Euripedes Pants, which featured a number of infamous Austin musicians. Washam later went on to drum for Ministry.

In the late spring of 1999, Brody received a call from Ministry co-performer Paul Barker, who offered the opportunity to perform saxophone parts during their ill-fated Dark Side of the Spoon tour. He later went on to perform one-half of the drum duties for their 2003 Animositisomina tour and album, as well as their follow-up Houses of the Molé.

He also appeared as the drummer for the "Flesh Fair Band" (a.k.a. Ministry) in the Kubrick/Spielberg (2001) film A.I..

Brody continues to work with fellow Austin musicians like Brett Bradford (Scratch Acid), Jeff Pinkus (Butthole Surfers), Jason Craig (Pocket FishRmen), Jimbo Yongue (Daddy Longhead), Randy Turner (Big Boys), Paul Barker (Ministry), Mike Scaccia (Ministry) Danny Barnes (Bad Livers), and John Hawkins (Crust), as well as New York musicians Victor Poison-tete (Rat At Rat R), Stu Spasm (Lubricated Goat), Italian conceptual artist Daniele Santaguiliana (Testing Vault) and L.A. music supervisor Jeff Kinart, in many different music projects.

Having learned a great deal about production during his years in Ministry, he has now begun to produce records and events on his own, and started a multimedia company called "Darkstack" with Austin visual artist D Kithcart. As of 2012, he had moved to Shoreline, Washington with his daughter. In 2013 he started a band with Danny Barnes (formerly of the Bad Livers) called the Test Apes. He has also released several solo efforts.

Personal discography[edit]

  • Various Artists, It Came Frumunda (1993, self-released)
  • Euripedes Pants, Way Up Off In There (1996, Sweatbox)
  • Sangre de Toro, Hold Yer Breath (1998, self-released)
  • Various Artists, Bands That Begin With the Letter "S" (1999, Sweatbox)
  • Sangre de Toro, El Pee (2000, self-released)
  • Various Artists, Diggy Diggy Die (2000, Rubble)
  • Various Artists, Diggy Diggy Dead (2005, Rubble)
  • Ministry, Greatest Fits (2001, Warner)
  • Ye Olde Castletons, In Like With Love (2001, Kranzke)
  • Goobersmoochers, Goobersmoochers I (2002, self-released)
  • Ministry, Animositisomina (2003, Sanctuary)
  • Taxi Crab Nebula, s/t (2003, self-released)
  • Naugahyde Dream Sequence, s/t (2003, self-released)
  • Pink Anvil, Halloween Party (2003, Ipecac)
  • Ministry, Houses of the Molé (2004, Sanctuary)
  • Areola 51, s/t (2004, Dead Teenager)
  • Insect Sex Act, Act 1 (2006, Stacked)
  • Max Brody, Passout EP (2007, Stacked)
  • Max Brody, Brody-Spasm-Tete Encounter (2007, self-released)
  • Shit Sherlock, The Ballad of St. Crespi (2010, self-released)
  • Pink Anvil, New Years Eve Party (2008, self-released)
  • Suffer Robot, Suffer Robot (2007, self-released)
  • Areola 51, The Double-D Sides, (2009, Stacked)
  • Shit Sherlock, Hans Pretzilrod (2011, self-released)
  • Goobersmoochers, Still Life With Goobers (2014, self-released)
  • Goobersmoochers, Mischief (2014, self-released)
  • Pink Anvil, Cubed (2015, self-released)
  • Max Brody, Guilty Pleasure, Vol.1 (2012, self-released)
  • Max Brody, Smitty (2012, self-released)
  • Smedley's Racket, Smedley's Racket (2014, self-released)
  • Test Apes, Test Apes (2014, Festive Duds Music)
  • Test Apes, Stranded On Earth (2015, Festive Duds Music)
  • Test Apes, Mystery Tool (2015, Festive Duds Music)
  • Test Apes, Remotes (2016, Festive Duds Music)
  • Max Brody, Couchlock (2016, self-released)
  • Notorious Early Procedures, ...We Walked Into God's Chest Howling (2016, self-released)
  • Goobersmoochers, Left On Piedmont (2016, self-released)
  • Test Apes, Chicken Pie Vortex (2017, Festive Duds Music)
  • Max Brody, High Strangeness In Stereophonic Sound (2017, self-released)
  • Goobersmoochers, "Too Big To Flush" (2017, self-released)
  • Smedley's Racket, "Never Letting A Good Crisis Go To Waste" (2017, self-released)
  • Creepy Stick, "Velveteen Straightjacket" (2017, self-released)

External links[edit]

References[edit]