Max Cahner

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Max Cahner i Garcia
Max Cahner.jpg
Max Cahner in 2012
Born(1936-12-03)3 December 1936
Bad Godesberg, Bonn, Germany
Died14 October 2013(2013-10-14) (aged 76)
Barcelona
NationalityCatalan
Known forpolitician and historian of Catalan literature
Political partyDemocratic Convergence of Catalonia
AwardsCatalonia Cross of St. George in 1996
Gold Medal of the Generalitat of Catalonia, 2013 (posthumous)

Max Cahner i Garcia (3 December 1936 – 14 October 2013) was a Catalan politician, and editor and historian of Catalan literature.[1][2][3]

Career[edit]

Cahner was born in Bad Godesberg, now a municipal district of Bonn, Germany, to a Jewish-Catalan father and a Catalan mother who had left during the Spanish Civil War. The Cahner family moved to Galicia in 1937 to avoid persecution from the rise of Nazism,[1] and then to Barcelona in 1939.[1] He enrolled at the University of Barcelona in 1952 studying chemistry.[2]

Via Ramon Bastardes, Cahner was introduced to and began working on Serra d'Or, an influential Catalan magazine published by Santa Maria de Montserrat Abbey. In 1964, he was expelled from Spain by the Franco regime for his Catalan nationalist activity.[2] From exile he continued he work on Catalan literature.[1]

In 1980, Cahner was appointed as the Minister of Culture in the Generalitat de Catalunya under Jordi Pujol, where he served for four years until 1984, when Joan Rigol took his place.[2][3]

In 1986, Cahner joined the Democratic Convergence of Catalonia, where he led the party's cultural work, and was elected as an MP in the 1988 elections.[1]

He died, aged 76, in 2013, and was posthumously awarded the Gold Medal of the Generalitat of Catalonia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Pujadas, John (2007). "Biographical notes by Max Cahner". Servir Catalunya: homenatge als 70 anys de Max Cahner [Serving Catalonia: A tribute to 70 years of Max Cahner] (in Catalan). The Abbey of Montserrat. pp. 229–250. ISBN 978-848415-909-4.
  2. ^ a b c d "Max Cahner". Història de la Revista de Catalunya (in Catalan). Retrieved 2013-12-22.
  3. ^ a b "Muere Max Cahner". LaVanguardia.com (in Catalan). 2013-10-14. Retrieved 2013-12-22.

External links[edit]

Political offices
New office Minister of Culture of the Generalitat de Catalunya
1980–1984
Succeeded by
Joan Rigol