Max D. Barnes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Max D. Barnes
Barnes and Merle Haggard performing in Nashville, Tennessee.
Barnes and Merle Haggard performing in Nashville, Tennessee.
Background information
Birth nameMax Duane Barnes
Born(1935-07-24)July 24, 1935
Hard Scratch, Iowa, U.S.
DiedJanuary 11, 2004(2004-01-11) (aged 67)
Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
GenresCountry
Years active1960–2004
LabelsOvation, Polydor, Country Roads
Associated actsGeorge Jones, Merle Haggard, Vince Gill, John Anderson, Vern Gosdin

Max Duane Barnes (July 24, 1935 – January 11, 2004) was an American country singer and songwriter born in Hard Scratch, Iowa, United States. In 1973, Barnes moved with his family from Omaha, Nebraska to Nashville, Tennessee, where he died at age 68.

Career[edit]

Barnes gained success as both a songwriter and a recording artist in the 1970s for Ovation Records, Polydor, and Country Roads Records.[1]

Over the course of his career, Barnes recorded more than 400 songs.[2] He composed some of the most popular country songs of the 1980s and 1990s.[3] His works have sold over 50 million records worldwide.[4]

Notable Barnes compositions recorded by others include:

Discography[edit]

7" single releases by Barnes include the following:[5][6]

  • "Ribbons Of Steel"/"Hello Honky Tonk" (Jed Records 1-72, 1972)
  • "You Gotta Be Puttin' Me On"/"Growing Old With Grace" (Willex 45-72-13, 1973)
  • "Rain All Over You"/"Bordertown Woman Blues" (Polydor PD 14386, 1977)
  • "Allegheny Lady"/"All The Way Inn" (Polydor PD 14419, 1977; #97 US country chart)[7]
  • "She Loves My Troubles Away"/"This Workin' Man's Got You" (Polydor PD 14466, 1978)
  • "Dear Mr. President"/"Patricia" (Ovation OV 1139, 1979)
  • "Mean Woman Blues"/"Too Far Gone To Find" (Ovation OV 1142, 1980)
  • "Cowboys Are Common As Sin"/"Only For You" (Ovation OV 1149, 1980)
  • "Heaven On A Freight Train"/"Patricia" (Ovation OV 1158, 1980)
  • "Don't Ever Leave Me Again"/"Singer Of Sad Songs" (Ovation 1164, 1981; #84 US country chart)
  • "She Loves My Troubles Away"/"Givin' Out From Givin' In" (Country Roads CRE007, 1981)
  • "Rainbows And Roses"/"Send Me Back To Caroline" (Country Roads DBW012, 1981)

12" album releases:

  • "Rough Around The Edges" (Ovation OV 1748, 1980)
  • "Pieces Of My Life" (Country Roads DBW-LP 1005, 1981)

Personal life[edit]

Prior to gaining fame as a singer and songwriter, he was a semi-truck driver. He drew inspiration for early songs from the trucker's life and encounters.[8]

L to R: Patsy Barnes, Max T. Barnes, Max D. Barnes, 10 August 1983

He was the father of three children, Genevieve Barnes Kephart, DeWayne Patrick Barnes and his youngest son, the award-winning singer-songwriter Max T. Barnes. Another son, Richard Barnes, died in an accident in 1975.[9]

Awards[edit]

Barnes is a two-time Country Music Association Awards Song of the Year winner,[10] in 1988 for "Chiseled in Stone," co-written with Vern Gosdin, and in 1992 for "Look at Us," co-written with Vince Gill.[11] He was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1989 for "Chiseled in Stone".[12] He won the BMI Songwriter Award 18 times.[3] In 1992, he was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Association's International Hall of Fame.[13] He received the following awards:[3]

  • "Chiseled in Stone" – 1989 Country Award
  • "Don't Take It Away" – 1980 Country Award
  • "Don't Tell Me What to Do" – 1992 Country Award/Million-Air (Two million)
  • "Drinkin' and Dreamin'" – 1986 Country Award
  • "I Can't Love You Enough" – 1978 Country Award
  • "I've Got It Made" – 1995 Country Award/Million-Air
  • "I Won't Need You Anymore (Always and Forever)" – 1988 Country Award/Million-Air
  • "If I Didn't Have You" – 1993 Country Award/Million-Air (Two million)
  • "Joe Knows How To Live" – 1989 Country Award/Million-Air
  • "Let Go of The Stone" – 1993 Country Award/Million-Air
  • "Look at Us" – 1992 Country Award/Million-Air (Two million)
  • "Ten Feet Away" – 1987 Country Award
  • "Red Neckin' Love Makin' Night" – 1982 Pop Award/1982 Country Award
  • "Thank God for the Radio" – 1985 Country Award
  • "That Just About Does It" – 1990 Country Award
  • "Way Down Deep" – 1984 Country Award
  • "Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes" – 1987 Country Award
  • "Do You Believe Me Now?" – Million-Air

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Max D. Barnes". Discogs. Retrieved May 28, 2018.
  2. ^ "Max T. Barnes". Max T. Barnes. Retrieved May 28, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c "Country Songwriting Great Max D. Barnes Dies in Nashville". Bmi.com. January 12, 2004. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  4. ^ "Max T. Barnes | Credits | AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved May 28, 2018.
  5. ^ https://www.45cat.com/artist/max-d-barnes
  6. ^ https://www.discogs.com/artist/733797-Max-D-Barnes
  7. ^ https://www.billboard.com/music/max-d-barnes/chart-history
  8. ^ https://alancackett.com/max-d-barnes-one-time-trucker-who-now-rates-high-on-nashville-s-hit-list
  9. ^ https://alancackett.com/max-d-barnes-one-time-trucker-who-now-rates-high-on-nashville-s-hit-list
  10. ^ "Past CMA Awards Winners and Nominees – 2017 CMA Awards". 2017 CMA Awards. Retrieved May 28, 2018.[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ "Past CMA Awards Winners and Nominees – 2017 CMA Awards". 2017 CMA Awards. Retrieved May 28, 2018.
  12. ^ "Vern Gosdin". GRAMMY.com. May 22, 2018. Retrieved May 28, 2018.
  13. ^ "Max D. Barnes, 67; Wrote Country Hits". Nytimes.com. Retrieved July 24, 2018.