Max More

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Max More at the 2006 Stanford Singularity Summit.

Max More (born Max T. O'Connor, January 1964) is a philosopher and futurist who writes, speaks, and consults on advanced decision-making about emerging technologies.[1][2]

Born in Bristol, England, More has a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from St Anne's College, Oxford (1987).[3][4] His 1995 University of Southern California doctoral dissertation The Diachronic Self: Identity, Continuity, and Transformation examined several issues that concern transhumanists, including the nature of death, and what it is about each individual that continues despite great change over time.[5]

Founder of the Extropy Institute, Max More has written many articles espousing the philosophy of transhumanism and the transhumanist philosophy of extropianism,[6] most importantly his Principles of Extropy.[7][8] In a 1990 essay "Transhumanism: Toward a Futurist Philosophy",[9] he introduced the term "transhumanism" in its modern sense.[10]

More is also noted for his writings about the impact of new and emerging technologies on businesses and other organizations. His "proactionary principle" is intended as a balanced guide to the risks and benefits of technological innovation.[11]

At the start of 2011, Max More became president and CEO of the Alcor Life Extension Foundation, an organization he joined in 1986. [12]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ Alex Heard, "Technology Makes us Optimistic; They Want To Live," New York Times, September 28, 1997
  2. ^ Joel Garreau, The Next Generation; Biotechnology May Make Superhero Fantasy a Reality, Washington Post, April 26, 2002.
  3. ^ Regis, Ed. "Meet the Extropians". Wired. 
  4. ^ Hughes, James. "The Politics of Transhumanism". 
  5. ^ More, Max. "The Diachronic Self: Identity, Continuity, Transformation". A. Bell & Howell. 
  6. ^ More, Max. "The Philosophy of Transhumanism" (PDF). John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  7. ^ More, Max. "Principles of Extropy". Extropy Institute. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  8. ^ Resources for Germline Technology, Washington Post, February 9, 2003.
  9. ^ More, Max. "Transhumanism: Towards a Futurist Philosophy". Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  10. ^ Bostrom, Nick (April 2005). "A history of transhumanist thought" (PDF). Journal of Evolution and Technology. 14 (1): 1–25. 
  11. ^ More, Max; N. Vita-More (11 March 2003). "The Proactionary Principle". The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future. doi:10.1002/9781118555927.ch26. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  12. ^ "Alcor Life Extension Foundation Names Max More, PhD, as Chief Executive Officer". Alcor News. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 

External links[edit]