May 1923

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The following events occurred in May 1923:

May 1, 1923 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 2, 1923 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 3, 1923 (Thursday)[edit]

May 4, 1923 (Friday)[edit]

May 5, 1923 (Saturday)[edit]

May 6, 1923 (Sunday)[edit]

May 7, 1923 (Monday)[edit]

May 8, 1923 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 9, 1923 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 10, 1923 (Thursday)[edit]

May 11, 1923 (Friday)[edit]

May 12, 1923 (Saturday)[edit]

May 13, 1923 (Sunday)[edit]

May 14, 1923 (Monday)[edit]

  • Benito Mussolini made a speech at the international women's suffrage congress in Rome in which he expressed support for the suffragists' cause. "Regarding the attitude of the government, I feel authorized in stating that the fascist government pledges itself to grant a vote to several classes of women, beginning with a local vote and then a national vote", Mussolini said.[22]
  • Died: Charles de Freycinet, 94, four-time Prime Minister of France

May 15, 1923 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 16, 1923 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 17, 1923 (Thursday)[edit]

May 18, 1923 (Friday)[edit]

May 19, 1923 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Zev won the Kentucky Derby.
  • About 1,000 advocates of women's suffrage marched through the streets of Rome. Benito Mussolini reviewed the parade and reiterated his pledge to give the vote to certain classes of Italian women by the end of the year.[30]
  • Bonar Law returned to London as his retirement due to health reasons was rumored to be imminent; the choice for next British Prime Minister was generally expected to be Lord Curzon.[31]

May 20, 1923 (Sunday)[edit]

May 21, 1923 (Monday)[edit]

May 22, 1923 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 23, 1923 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 24, 1923 (Thursday)[edit]

May 25, 1923 (Friday)[edit]

May 26, 1923 (Saturday)[edit]

May 27, 1923 (Sunday)[edit]

May 28, 1923 (Monday)[edit]

May 29, 1923 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Strikes in the Ruhr spread to unoccupied parts of Germany.[44]
  • Died: Albert Deullin, 32, French World War I flying ace (flying accident testing new airplane prototype); Adolf Oberländer, 78, German caricaturist

May 30, 1923 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 31, 1923 (Thursday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 306. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  2. ^ "Pro-Klan Talk Brings a Riot". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 2, 1923. p. 1.
  3. ^ "Ruthenberg Is Found Guilty of Syndicalism". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 3, 1923. p. 1.
  4. ^ "Army Men Fly Coast to Coast Without a Stop". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 4, 1923. p. 1.
  5. ^ "Today in Transportation History: May 3, 1923". WTS International. May 3, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  6. ^ "State Prohibition". The Northern Advocate. Whangarei: 5. May 7, 1924.
  7. ^ Wang, Jiwu (2006). "His Dominion" and the "Yellow Peril": Protestant Missions to Chinese Immigrants in Canada, 1859–1967. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. p. 69. ISBN 978-0-88920-485-0.
  8. ^ "Headingly Carnegie Stadium: Facts & Figures". Yorkshire Carnegie. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  9. ^ Dailey, Charles (May 8, 1923). "Two Yanks Shot as Chinese Fight Bandits". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  10. ^ Rothstein, Meryl (2006). "Lucy and the Chinese Bandits". Center for Digital Scholarship. Brown Library. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  11. ^ "Miss Lucy Aldrich Safe and Unharmed". Lewiston Daily Sun. Lewiston, Maine: 1 and 11. May 8, 1923.
  12. ^ Williams, Paul (May 9, 1923). "Krupp Given 15 Years in Prison; Germans Angry". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  13. ^ Dailey, Charles (May 9, 1923). "China Orders Ransom Paid for Captives". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  14. ^ Ryan, Thomas (May 10, 1923). "Dublin Rejects De Valera Note on Irish Peace". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  15. ^ Fuegi, John (1987). Bertolt Brecht: Chaos, According to Plan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 191. ISBN 978-0-521-28245-1.
  16. ^ Fendrick, Raymond (May 11, 1923). "Soviet Envoy Slain in Cafe". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  17. ^ "Major League Home Run Mark Set as Phils Nip Cards, 20 to 14". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 12, 1923. p. 20.
  18. ^ Kurtz, Paul. 162-0: Imagine a Phillies Perfect Season: A Game-By-Game Analysis of the Greatest Wins in Phillies History. Triumph Books. ISBN 978-1-62368-446-4.
  19. ^ "Home Runs in a Game by a Team Records". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  20. ^ Stradley, Don (September 21, 2008). "Willard helped raise the roof at Yankee Stadium". ESPN. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  21. ^ "Germany – The Republic in Crisis 1920–1923". The World War. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  22. ^ De Santo, V. (May 15, 1923). "Mussolini Bids Italian Women Take Suffrage". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 17.
  23. ^ Dailey, Charles (May 16, 1923). "Indict Brickley, Harvard Star, on Theft Charge". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  24. ^ Frattasio, Marc (2013). NAS Squantum: The First Naval Air Reserve Base (6th Ed.). Penbroke, Massachusetts: Lulu Press. p. 104. ISBN 978-1-304-66249-1.
  25. ^ "Chinese Kill as Warning to Speed Ransom". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 16, 1923. p. 1.
  26. ^ "The Commons – Unparliamentary Expression". Hawera & Normanby Star. Hawera. May 17, 1923. p. 5.
  27. ^ Steele, John (May 16, 1923). "Russia Debate Bumps Red Out of Parliament". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1.
  28. ^ "Bonar Law Said to be Very Ill in Paris Hotel". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 17, 1923. p. 1.
  29. ^ Mumford, Meg (2009). Bertolt Brecht. Oxon: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-134-18806-2.
  30. ^ De Santo, V. (May 20, 1923). "Old Rome Finds Something New; Women's Parade". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  31. ^ Steele, John (May 20, 1923). "Curzon Battles to Win Mantle of Bonar Law". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  32. ^ Ryan, Thomas (May 21, 1923). "Illness Forces Bonar Law Out; Call Curzon". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  33. ^ Gürsoy, Anil. Sports Law in Turkey. Wolters Kluwer. p. 38. ISBN 978-90-411-3617-6.
  34. ^ Steele, John (May 23, 1923). "Britons Greet New Premier as Man of People". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  35. ^ Proudman, Mark F. (2008). Hodge, Carl Cavanagh, ed. Encyclopedia of the Age of Imperialism, 1800–1914. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 174. ISBN 978-0-313-04341-3.
  36. ^ "Historic World Earthquakes – Iran". United States Geological Survey. Archived from the original on July 28, 2010. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  37. ^ "Essen Looted by Communists; Strike Spreads". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 26, 1923. p. 2.
  38. ^ Clayton, John (May 27, 1923). "400,000 Join "Hunger Strike" in Ruhr". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  39. ^ The Treaties of Peace, 1919–1923, Volume 1. Clark, New Jersey: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. 2007. p. xl. ISBN 978-1-58477-708-3.
  40. ^ "Hearst Says He Will Back Ford for President". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 27, 1923. p. 3.
  41. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (May 30, 1923). "Ford Candidacy Stirs Wonder, Envy and Fear". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1.
  42. ^ Hylton, Hilary; Rossie, Cam (2006). Insiders' Guide to Austin (Fifth ed.). Morris Book Publishing. pp. 183, 186. ISBN 978-0-7627-4041-3.
  43. ^ Smith, Julia Cauble (June 15, 2010). "Santa Rita Oil Well". Handbook of Texas (online ed.). Texas State Historical Association.
  44. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (May 30, 1923). "Ruhr Reds Fan Strike Flames All Over Germany; Riots Costing 50 Lives Die Out". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  45. ^ Williams, Paul (May 31, 1923). "50% Wage Raise Ends Strike of 500,000 in Ruhr". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.