May 1925

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
01 02
03 04 05 06 07 08 09
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31  

The following events occurred in May 1925:

May 1, 1925 (Friday)[edit]

May 2, 1925 (Saturday)[edit]

May 3, 1925 (Sunday)[edit]

May 4, 1925 (Monday)[edit]

May 5, 1925 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 6, 1925 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The Wilno school massacre occurred in Wilno, Poland when a pair of eighth-grade students attacked the board of examiners with bullets and grenades, killing several people as well as themselves.

May 7, 1925 (Thursday)[edit]

May 8, 1925 (Friday)[edit]

May 9, 1925 (Saturday)[edit]

May 10, 1925 (Sunday)[edit]

May 11, 1925 (Monday)[edit]

May 12, 1925 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 13, 1925 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 14, 1925 (Thursday)[edit]

May 15, 1925 (Friday)[edit]

  • U.S. President Calvin Coolidge ruled out prohibitionist Wayne Wheeler's plan to use the American navy to enforce the Volstead Act, believing he navy's purpose should only be for national defense and not police duty.[10]
  • Editorials in the Japanese press decried American plans to strengthen the naval base at Pearl Harbor, as such plans either suggested fear of Japanese aggression towards America or American aggression towards Japan.[11]
  • Al-Insaniyyah, the first Arabic communist newspaper, is founded.
  • Died: Nelson A. Miles, 85, American general

May 16, 1925 (Saturday)[edit]

May 17, 1925 (Sunday)[edit]

May 18, 1925 (Monday)[edit]

May 19, 1925 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 20, 1925 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 21, 1925 (Thursday)[edit]

  • In an expedition directed by explorer Roald Amundsen, two specially-equipped seaplanes (the N24 and N25) took off from Kings Bay (now Ny-Ålesund) in Svalbard, Norway in an attempt to be the first to fly to the North Pole.[15]
  • Legal 4.4 beer went on sale in the Canadian province of Ontario, triggering an influx of visitors from bordering U.S. states.[16]
  • Died: Hidesaburō Ueno, 53 or 54, Japanese agricultural scientist and guardian of Hachiko

May 22, 1925 (Friday)[edit]

  • Unsure of their position, experiencing engine trouble and with half their fuel used up, the crew of the N25 touched down on the ice 150 miles short of the North Pole. The N24 spotted their predicament and landed as well. The next twenty-four days would be spent trying to chisel a primitive runway to take off again.[15][17]
  • Born: James King, tenor singer, in Dodge City, Kansas (d. 2005); Jean Tinguely, artist, in Fribourg, Switzerland (d. 1991)
  • Died: John French, 1st Earl of Ypres, 72, British field marshal

May 23, 1925 (Saturday)[edit]

May 24, 1925 (Sunday)[edit]

May 25, 1925 (Monday)[edit]

May 26, 1925 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 27, 1925 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 28, 1925 (Thursday)[edit]

May 29, 1925 (Friday)[edit]

  • British aviator Alan Cobham set a new record for the longest nonstop flight in a light airplane, flying his de Havilland Moth from Croydon Aerodrome in London to Zürich, Switzerland. The flight consumed only twenty-five gallons of gasoline and six pints of oil.[21]

May 30, 1925 (Saturday)[edit]

May 31, 1925 (Sunday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 330. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  2. ^ "Jugo-Slav King Sends Brother to Internment". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 3, 1925. p. 2.
  3. ^ "Championship Playoffs 1924/25". Rugby League Project. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  4. ^ "Bolivia (1917–present)". University of Central Arkansas. Retrieved January 2, 2015.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ Garfinkle, Martin (2005). The Jewish Community of Washington, D.C. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 0-7385-4156-7.
  6. ^ a b "Chronology 1925". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  7. ^ "Hindenburg's Inaugural Speech". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 13, 1925. p. 5.
  8. ^ a b Adams, Noah (July 5, 2005). "Timeline: Remembering the Scopes Monkey Trial". National Public Radio. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  9. ^ "French Storm Bibane Height". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 15, 1925. p. 1.
  10. ^ "Navy a Defense Arm, Not a Rum Fist – Coolidge". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 16, 1925. p. 1.
  11. ^ Mathson, Roderick (May 16, 1925). "U.S. Superbase Plan for Hawaii Arouses Japan". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  12. ^ "Romania (1904–present)". University of Central Arkansas. Retrieved January 2, 2015.[permanent dead link]
  13. ^ "See Dictator's End as Spain Ends Army Rule". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 19, 1925. p. 6.
  14. ^ Duncan, Hannibal Gerald (1933). Immigration and Assimilation. Boston: Heath. p. 156.
  15. ^ a b "With The N24 and the N25 Towards the North Pole (1925)". Polar Expeditions. Fram Museum. Archived from the original on December 3, 2014. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  16. ^ Kinsley, Philip (May 22, 1925). "Open Ontario Beer Spigots". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  17. ^ Czech, Kenneth P. (June 12, 2006). "Roald Amundsen and the 1925 North Pole Expedition". Historynet.com. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  18. ^ "Amundsen Lost 6 Days; U.S. May Send Rescuers". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 27, 1925. p. 1.
  19. ^ Greenberg, Michael I. (2006). Encyclopedia of Terrorist, Natural, and Man-made Disasters. Sudbury, Massachusetts: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. p. 186. ISBN 978-0-7637-3782-5.
  20. ^ Skene, Don (May 29, 1925). "Britain Opens War in Reds; Bars All Moscow Agitators". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  21. ^ Skene, Don (May 30, 1925). "500 Miles and Back in Day in Air for $10". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  22. ^ Shaffer, George (May 31, 1925). "Plot to Kidnap Mary Pickford". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  23. ^ "May 31, 1925 Cincinnati Reds at St. Louis Cardinals". Baseball Reference.