May 1968

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1968
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The following events occurred in May 1968:

May 1, 1968 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 2, 1968 (Thursday)[edit]

May 3, 1968 (Friday)[edit]

  • Braniff Flight 352 crashes near Dawson, Texas, killing all 85 persons on board. It is a scheduled domestic flight from William P. Hobby Airport in Houston, to Dallas Love Field in Dallas. The Lockheed L-188A Electra, registration N9707C, breaks up in midair and crashes, after flying into a severe thunderstorm. It was carrying 5 crew and 80 passengers; there were no survivors. Among those killed is Texas state representative Joseph Lockridge, the first black man to represent Dallas County in the Texas Legislature. Investigations later revealed that the accident was caused by structural over-stress and failure of the airframe while attempting recovery from loss of control during a steep 180-degree turn executed in an attempt to escape the weather.[2]
  • Students at the Sorbonne in Paris, France, protest against the closure of Paris University at Nanterre and the proposed expulsion of some students.[3]

May 4, 1968 (Saturday)[edit]

May 5, 1968 (Sunday)[edit]

May 6, 1968 (Monday)[edit]

  • In Paris, student protests continue. The Union Nationale des Étudiants de France (UNEF), France's largest student union, along with the union of university teachers, stages a march to protest against police actions at the Sorbonne. More than 20,000 protesters march towards the Sorbonne, and the police charge with batons. Some protesters create barricades and throw paving stones. The police respond with tear gas. Hundreds are arrested.
  • Argentine tanker MV Islas Orcadas explodes, catches fire and sinks at Ensenada, Buenos Aires Province. Burning oil sets two other tankers Fray Luis Beltran and Cutral Co on fire, both of which sink.[7]

May 7, 1968 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • In Paris, students, teachers and young workers gather at the Arc de Triomphe to demand that criminal charges against arrested students be dropped and that the authorities reopen Nanterre and Sorbonne universities.
  • Died: Mike Spence, 31, British racing driver, while test driving a Lotus 56 turbocar in preparation for the Indianapolis 500.[8]

May 8, 1968 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 9, 1968 (Thursday)[edit]

May 10, 1968 (Friday)[edit]

  • In Paris, a crowd congregates on the Rive Gauche, and violence between them and the police resumes, after unsuccessful negotiations. It is claimed that the police used agents provocateurs to aggravate the situation by burning cars and throwing Molotov cocktails.[9]
  • Greek cargo ship Gero Miklaos runs aground and breaks up in a cyclone at Akyab, Burma.

May 11, 1968 (Saturday)[edit]

May 12, 1968 (Sunday)[edit]

May 13, 1968 (Monday)[edit]

May 14, 1968 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 15, 1968 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 16, 1968 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Ronan Point, a 23-storey tower block in Canning Town, east London, UK, partially collapses after a gas explosion, killing five people. The disaster highlights an area of design which had not previously been considered and which led to changes in legislation in the UK and other countries.[12]

May 17, 1968 (Friday)[edit]

May 18, 1968 (Saturday)[edit]

Dorothy Anstett wins the 17th Miss USA pageant at Miami, Florida.[14]

May 19, 1968 (Sunday)[edit]

May 20, 1968 (Monday)[edit]

May 21, 1968 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 22, 1968 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 23, 1968 (Thursday)[edit]

May 24, 1968 (Friday)[edit]

May 25, 1968 (Saturday)[edit]

  • In France, negotiations begin between the Pompidou government, trade unions, and the Organisation patronale, leading to the Grenelle agreements.[21]

May 26, 1968 (Sunday)[edit]

May 27, 1968 (Monday)[edit]

May 28, 1968 (Tuesday)[edit]

May 29, 1968 (Wednesday)[edit]

May 30, 1968 (Thursday)[edit]

  • France's Prime Minister, Georges Pompidou, suggests that President de Gaulle dissolve the National Assembly and call a new election by threatening to resign. Instead, de Gaulle announces his refusal to resign, calls an election for 23 June, and threatens to declare a state of emergency. Opposition parties agree to the election.[26]
  • The Indianapolis 500 is won by Bobby Unser in a turbocharged Offenhauser-powered car.

May 31, 1968 (Friday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rotman, Patrick (2008). Mai 68 raconté à ceux qui ne l'ont pas vécu (in French). Seuil. pp. 10–11. ISBN 978-2021127089. 
  2. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 2006-10-14.
  3. ^ Damamme, Dominique; Gobille, Boris; Matonti, Frédérique; Pudal, Bernard, eds. (2008). Mai-juin 68 (in French). Éditions de l'Atelier. p. 190. ISBN 978-2708239760. 
  4. ^ "THE 1968 KENTUCKY DERBY : THE VICTORY THAT WASN'T : Dancer's Image, Who Finished First, Was Disqualified After Positive Test for Illegal Medication". Articles.latimes.com. 1988-05-01. Retrieved 2016-06-05. 
  5. ^ "1968". Kentuckyderby.com. Retrieved 2016-06-05. 
  6. ^ Nolan, Keith W. (2006). House to House: Playing the Enemy's Game in Saigon, May 1968 (2006 ed.). Zenith Imprint. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-7603-2330-4. 
  7. ^ "Three tankers in port explosion". The Times (57245). London. 7 May 1968. col C, p. 5. 
  8. ^ Ferguson, Andrew (October 1996). Team Lotus: the Indianapolis Years. Somerset, England: Patrick Stephens Limited. pp. 181–184. ISBN 1 85260 491 3. 
  9. ^ "Michel Rocard :". Le Monde.fr. 
  10. ^ "Live May 11, 1968". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  11. ^ "King Badouin and Queen Fabiola arrived at Dublin Airport". Irish Photo Archive. 1968-05-14. 
  12. ^ Beyond Failure: Forensic Case Studies for Civil Engineers. Reston, Virginia, USA: American Society of Civil Engineers Publications. 2009. p. 418. ISBN 978-0-7844-0973-2. 
  13. ^ News footage of this action was shot by Baltimore's WBAL-TV.
  14. ^ Associated Press (1968-05-19). "Washington Girl Named Miss USA". Reading Eagle. 
  15. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1048 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  16. ^ "Asian Cup: Know Your History – Part One (1956–1988)". Goal.com. 7 January 2011. Retrieved 3 May 2015. 
  17. ^ "Strange Devices That Found the Sunken Sub Scorpion." Popular Science, April 1969, pp. 66–71.
  18. ^ Treadway, James A., Hard Charger! The Story of the USS Biddle DLG-34, Lincoln, Nebraska: iUniverse, 2005, p. 119, ISBN 978-0-595-36009-3.
  19. ^ Friedman, Norman, "The Navy's Ramjet Missile," Naval History, June 2014, p. 11.
  20. ^ "Cannes 1968: Fighting on the Beaches". Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  21. ^ Michael Seidman, 'Workers in a Repressive Society of Seductions: Parisian Metallurgists in May–June 1968', French Historical Studies 18:1 (1993), p. 264.
  22. ^ Rolling Stone, No. 13, "Little Willie John Dies in Prison", July 6, 1968
  23. ^ Williams, Kenneth H. (1988). ""Oh Baby…It's Really Happening:" The Louisville Race Riot of 1968". The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society. 3: 57–58. 
  24. ^ Dogan, Mattei (1984). "How Civil War Was Avoided in France". International Political Science Review / Revue internationale de science politique. 5 (3): 245–277. doi:10.1177/019251218400500304. JSTOR 1600894. 
  25. ^ Mendel, Arthur P. (January 1969). "Why the French Communists Stopped the Revolution". The Review of Politics. 31 (1): 3–27. doi:10.1017/s0034670500008913. JSTOR 1406452. 
  26. ^ "Lycos". 
  27. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 44602. p. 6340. 8 June 1968. Retrieved 3 April 2016.