May Company Building (Broadway, Los Angeles)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
May Company Building
Exterior view of The Hamburger's Store building (later became the May Company) on the corner of Eighth Street and Broadway, Los Angeles, ca.1912
Exterior view of The Hamburger's Store building (later became the May Company) on the corner of Eighth Street and Broadway, Los Angeles, ca.1912
May Company Building (Broadway, Los Angeles) is located in Downtown Los Angeles
May Company Building (Broadway, Los Angeles)
Location 801 S. Broadway
Los Angeles[1]
Coordinates 34°02′37″N 118°15′18″W / 34.043728°N 118.2548894°W / 34.043728; -118.2548894Coordinates: 34°02′37″N 118°15′18″W / 34.043728°N 118.2548894°W / 34.043728; -118.2548894
Area 1,100,000 square feet (100,000 m2)[2]
Built 1906[1]
Architect Alfred F. Rosenheim[1]
Architectural style Beaux-Arts[1]
Part of Broadway Theater and Commercial District (#79000484)
Hamburger Department Store design, c. 1906
The May Company terrazzo at the entrance of the company's flagship department store in downtown Los Angeles
Contemporary view of the May Company Broadway building

The May Company Building on Broadway in Downtown Los Angeles, a.k.a. Hamburgers/May Company Department Store[1] and the May Department Store Building, currently named the California Broadway Trade Center, was the flagship store of the May Company California department store chain. It is a contributing property to the NRHP-listed Broadway Theater and Commercial District.

History[edit]

By the start of the twentieth century, A. Hamburger & Sons had even outgrown their Spring Street location, which had 520 employees working on five floors.[3] The Hamburger family decided to build a much larger store at the southeast corner of Broadway and Eighth, a location that was outside of then current retail district. Construction started in 1905 with a grand opening held in 1908.[4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16] This location, which was also known as The Great White Store, was the largest department store building west of Chicago at that time and would eventually become the flagship location for the May Company California. At the time that the Great White Store was opened, the store could boast of having one of the first escalators on the West Coast, several restaurants, a drug store with an 80-foot-long soda fountain,[17] grocery store, bakery, fruit store, meat market, U.S. post office, telegraph office, barber shop, a dentist, a chiropractor, a physician's office with a fully equipped operating room, a 1,000-seat auditorium,[17] an electricity and steam power plant in the basement that was large enough to support a city of 50,000 inhabitants, a private volunteer 120 men fire brigade,[18][19] 13 acres of retail space, and 1200 employees.[7][20][21][22][23][24] The Los Angeles Public Library was also located on the third floor from 1908 until it was forced to move to a larger location when it outgrew the Hamburger space by 1913.[25][26][27] For a short time, Woodbury Business College briefly was also located on the fifth floor.[28]

In 1925, the Hamburgers sold their store to the May family of St. Louis for $8.5 million.[29][30] Thomas and Wilbur Mays, sons of the founder of the May Company, were sent to manage the former Hamburger store. One of the first things that they did was to expand the store again by building adjacent additions on the other parts of the city block.ain by building adjacent additions on the other parts of the city block.[31][32] After several more years, the May Company store eventually occupied almost the entire block between Broadway and Hill and between Eighth and Ninth Streets. The old Hamburger store was officially rename The May Company in 1927.[33][34]

The department store closed in 1986 and the building was turned into retail on the ground floors and a garment factory on the upper floors.[2]

In 2014 it was announced that Waterbridge Capital had agreed to buy the building for an estimated $115–130 million ; L.A. City Council member Jose Huizar indicated plans a mixed-use development to include offices, a hotel, stores and/or apartments or condominiums.[2] The acquisition by Waterbridge Capital and New York real estate developer Jack Jangana - Broadbridge LA LLC - was completed on August 20, 2014.

A spokesman for the company that helped broker the deal said plans include a 24-month renovation that will result in a "creative campus" similar to Twitter's headquarters building in San Francisco. The investors' goal is to create "one of the largest single tech centers" in the United States.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Hamburgers/May Company Department Store". Los Angeles Conservancy. 
  2. ^ a b c Vincent, Roger (April 12, 2014). "Former May Co. building in downtown L.A. to get revived after sale". Los Angeles Times. 
  3. ^ "How a Big Department Store Keeps Track of Things; Mose Hamburger Gives the Public an Idea of How His Mammoth Establishment Is Conducted". Los Angeles Herald. 27 (301). July 29, 1900. p. 24 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  4. ^ "Greatest Building Undertaking Here: Hamburgers Will Rear Three Fine Blocks on Broadway, Eighth, Ninth and Hill Streets, Costing, With Ground, Perhaps Three Millions". Los Angeles Times. July 29, 1905. p. II6. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  5. ^ "Hamburger's Celebration: Silver Shovel Turns Earth for Great Enterprise; Army of Joyous Employees in Big Street Parade; Start Made on Seven-story Department Store". Los Angeles Times. October 18, 1905. p. II10. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  6. ^ "White And Many-Pillared Mansion Of Commerce, Largest Building On Pacific Coast, Adds New Show Place To City: Palace of Trade Nears Completion". Los Angeles Times. May 31, 1908. p. III1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  7. ^ a b "Great Store's First Drill: Hamburger Army Through Paces for Opening; Get Familiar With "Lay" of New Establishment; Many Delights for Shoppers Are in Prospect". Los Angeles Times. July 26, 1908. p. V13. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  8. ^ ""Acre" Store In Readiness: Hamburger's Open Tomorrow At New Location; Great Crowd Is Expected at the Start of Broadway Store, but Spacious Aisles Will Swallow Thousands Without Discomfort--Many Novelties Will Attract Attention". Los Angeles Times. August 9, 1908. p. V17. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  9. ^ "Big Expansion For Hamburgers; New Department Store With Great Floor Space". Los Angeles Herald. 32 (302). July 30, 1905. p. III1 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  10. ^ "Money Making Combination; Hamburger & Sons Began In November, 1881; Rapid Growth Of Business". Los Angeles Herald. 32 (302). July 30, 1905. p. III1 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  11. ^ "Thousands See Imposing Parade; First Work Done On Great Hamburger Store; Biggest Retail Institution West of Chicago Is Begun With Celebration in Which Entire Force of Employes Takes Part". Los Angeles Herald. 33 (17). October 18, 1905. p. II2 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  12. ^ "New Hamburger Store; Owners Will Make Huge Department Emporium One of the Big Show Places of California". Los Angeles Herald. 33 (98). January 7, 1906. p. 7 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  13. ^ "Contract Let for Hamburgers Big Department Store; Pledges Of The Well Known Company Are Made Good". Los Angeles Herald. 33 (197). April 15, 1906. p. 4 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  14. ^ "New Hamburger Building, Eighth And Broadway". Los Angeles Herald. 35 (200). April 19, 1908. p. 1 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  15. ^ "Hamburger's In Great Building; Massive New Structure To Be Opened Tomorrow; Los Angeles' Latest Department Store A Marvel; History of Conception and Completion of Magnificent Mercantile Establishment—Architectural Triumph—Cover 15 Acres". Los Angeles Herald. 35 (312). August 9, 1908. p. 6 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  16. ^ "Hamburger Monster Store Thrown Open; Immense Stock And Staff Fully Installed; Building Replete with Latest Contrivances for Accommodation of Customers and Display of Different Lines of Goods". Los Angeles Herald. 35 (313). August 10, 1908. p. 12 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  17. ^ a b c Vincent, Roger (22 August 2014). "Former May Co. building in downtown Los Angeles is sold for $130 million". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  18. ^ "Fire Fighters At Hamburger's: Private Department Organized In Big Store. Manager John Budge Installs Five Companies in Building for Additional Protection for Stock and Patrons of Store--Al Keable Chosen Chief of the New Fire Department". Los Angeles Times. January 7, 1906. p. II3. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  19. ^ "Hamburger's Firemen Score: Chief Lips Reviews Drill at Big Department Store and Furnishes Special Feature". Los Angeles Times. March 20, 1908. p. II3. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  20. ^ "Hamburger's Big Store Celebrates: Thirty-Fifth Anniversary Sale To Mark Event; Started in Small Room on Main Street, Now Occupies Building with Thirteen Acres of Floor Space---History of the Great Emporium's Growth and Success". Los Angeles Times. October 29, 1916. p. III_A15. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  21. ^ "Story Of The "Big White Store". Los Angeles Times. April 1, 1923. p. I2. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  22. ^ "The May Co. Begins 50th "Golden Jubilee" Celebration Tomorrow: Ceremony Commemorates Founding of "The People's Store" in 1881 Golden Circulars Delivered to Homes Saturday Give Full Details of Values Believed to be Greatest in Store's History". Los Angeles Times. July 24, 1931. p. 8. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  23. ^ Gray, Olive (July 24, 1931). "May Company's Fete Plans Set: Golden Jubilee Celebration Will Open Tomorrow D. A. Hamburger, Founder, Scheduled to Speak; Horse Car of Early Days to Traverse Old Route". Los Angeles Times. p. A5. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  24. ^ "Sale Marks Founding Of Store Here: May Company Celebration Opening Tomorrow Will Be Featured by Contests". Los Angeles Times. July 26, 1935. p. 12. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  25. ^ "Public Library Sill Move To Great Hamburger Building.: Expanding City Institution Will Have the Most of the Third Floor and a Roof Garden". Los Angeles Times. February 9, 1908. p. V1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  26. ^ "Our Public Library". Los Angeles Times. February 9, 1913. p. II6. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  27. ^ "Library Gets New Quarters: Site 'Selected' Is in Heart of the city; To Occupy Three Floors of Big Building; Express Elevator Service a Feature". Los Angeles Times. April 10, 1913. p. II9. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  28. ^ "Students To Be Housed In New Hamburger Store". Los Angeles Herald. 35 (333). August 30, 1908. p. 6 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection. 
  29. ^ "Hamburger Store Sold: Millions Paid In Store Deal; Hamburger's Department Store Is Sold to Eastern Merchants". Los Angeles Times. April 1, 1923. p. I1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  30. ^ "May Department Stores: Purchase of Hamburger & Sons Includes Long-Time Lease --Profits of Store $1,000,000 a Year". Wall Street Journal. February 26, 1923. p. 16. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  31. ^ "Hamburgers To Erect Addition: New Store Project to Cost $2,500,000 Structure to Join Present Property on South; Latest Features Provided in Architect's Plans". Los Angeles Times. July 27, 1923. p. II20. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  32. ^ "Buildings Announced: Hamburger's Department Store to Construct Addition; Many Other New Projects Planned; Los Angeles Sets Unprecedented Pace for Downtown Activity in Summer Months". Los Angeles Times. July 29, 1923. p. V1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  33. ^ "Display Ad". Los Angeles Times. March 1, 1925. p. B9. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  34. ^ "May Company Holds Opening: Superb Floral Tributes Crowd Aisles Wishbone is Attraction at Main Entrance Owner Says House Builds to Fit Los Angeles". Los Angeles Times. March 3, 1925. p. A2. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.